platitude

noun
plat·​i·​tude | \ ˈpla-tə-ˌtüd How to pronounce platitude (audio) , -ˌtyüd \

Definition of platitude

1 : the quality or state of being dull or insipid
2 : a banal, trite, or stale remark

Examples of platitude in a Sentence

His speech was filled with familiar platitudes about the value of hard work and dedication. “blondes have more fun” is a silly platitude
Recent Examples on the Web Dozens of motivational quotes tell us that is discomfort is where growth happens—I’ve repeated this platitude to my backpacking clients and friends while scrambling a ridgeline or taking off our hiking boots to ford an ice-cold river. Hannah Singleton, Outside Online, 31 Mar. 2022 The triumphant stars would save face, in the knowledge that their dronings, rich in platitude and gratitude, would never make the cut, and our Sunday evening would be magically freed up. Anthony Lane, The New Yorker, 28 Mar. 2022 Auburn wasted no time in making sure its belief in Johnson wasn’t just an empty platitude. Tom Green | Tgreen@al.com, al, 18 Mar. 2022 The idea that earthly matters can’t touch something as lofty as space travel is only a platitude, not a certainty. Marina Koren, The Atlantic, 27 Feb. 2022 The idea that thought creates reality is not just a metaphysical platitude, but something that needs to be put into constant action through our choices and actions. Jennifer Sodini, Rolling Stone, 29 Sep. 2021 But to list these as elements of a Mexican story is to assert a platitude, and Melchor’s novel is not a catalog of the country’s troubles. Emmanuel Ordóñez Angulo, The New York Review of Books, 14 Jan. 2021 Skye Townsend’s platitude-spewing R&B songstress, Punkie Johnson’s Us-like dance-move biter, and Laci Mosley’s desperate lesbian commentator come to mind. Bethy Squires, Vulture, 13 July 2021 Manchin used that article to construct a platitude-laden argument about bipartisanship -- the subtext of which seemed to suggest that for him, reelection as the senior senator from West Virginia, is more important than anything else. Lincoln Mitchell, CNN, 8 June 2021 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'platitude.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of platitude

1762, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for platitude

French, from plat flat, dull

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Time Traveler for platitude

Time Traveler

The first known use of platitude was in 1762

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Dictionary Entries Near platitude

platinum sponge

platitude

platitudinal

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Statistics for platitude

Last Updated

14 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Platitude.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/platitude. Accessed 23 May. 2022.

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Nglish: Translation of platitude for Spanish Speakers

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