contingent

adjective
con·​tin·​gent | \ kən-ˈtin-jənt How to pronounce contingent (audio) \

Definition of contingent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : dependent on or conditioned by something else Payment is contingent on fulfillment of certain conditions. a plan contingent on the weather
2 : likely but not certain to happen : possible
3 : not logically necessary especially : empirical
4a : happening by chance or unforeseen causes
b : subject to chance or unseen effects : unpredictable
c : intended for use in circumstances not completely foreseen contingent funds
5 : not necessitated : determined by free choice

contingent

noun

Definition of contingent (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a representative group : delegation, detachment a diplomatic contingent
2 : something contingent (see contingent entry 1) : contingency

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Other Words from contingent

Adjective

contingently adverb

Synonyms for contingent

Synonyms: Noun

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Choose the Right Synonym for contingent

Adjective

accidental, fortuitous, casual, contingent mean not amenable to planning or prediction. accidental stresses chance. any resemblance to actual persons is entirely accidental fortuitous so strongly suggests chance that it often connotes entire absence of cause. a series of fortuitous events casual stresses lack of real or apparent premeditation or intent. a casual encounter with a stranger contingent suggests possibility of happening but stresses uncertainty and dependence on other future events for existence or occurrence. the contingent effects of the proposed law

Examples of contingent in a Sentence

Adjective The isolation and co-optation of the capitalist classes in Germany meant that liberty as an ideal had no contingent link with capitalism, as had happened in Western Europe. — Orlando Patterson, New Republic, 8 Nov. 1999 He knows that the throngs cheering for him today will be cheering for someone else tomorrow, that enthusiasm is fickle, that real support for someone like him always has something completely contingent about it. — Andrew Sullivan, New Republic, 8 July 1996 Clearly the President was chastened by the sorrow and resentment of the people to whom he spoke, but his words were somehow tentative and contingent, as if they could be withdrawn on a month's notice. — Lewis H. Lapham, Harper's, July 1992 Every undogmatic historian is aware of the multitude of contingent events that entered into the victory of the Bolshevik revolution. — Sidney Hook, Revolution, Reform & Social Justice, 1975 If the Sovereigns would grant him, contingent on his success, such rank, titles, and property that he and his issue could hold up their heads with the Spanish nobility, well and good … — Samuel Eliot Morison, The European Discovery of America, 1974 Noun Hollywood, Madison Avenue, the FCC, and a growing contingent in corporate America: It's hard to imagine a more formidable alliance pushing segregated television. — Tamar Jacoby, New Republic, 24 Jan. 2000 A Maori contingent, unable to face the intensity of the Turkish fire, sought shelter in a nearby gully. — Martin Gilbert, The First World War, 1994 But just because we banned it [DDT] domestically, under pressure from the bird-watching contingent … it doesn't necessarily follow that the rest of the world was about to jump on the bandwagon. — T. Coraghessan Boyle, Harper's, April 1993 The group that makes up the largest contingent of voters in this area is the elderly. A contingent of reporters waited in front of the court for the defendant to appear. A British contingent was sent to assist the security forces.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Just as a writer, a mind, and neither shaped nor limited by any partial or, to her, contingent identity—by anything that was not self-defined. Michael Gorra, The New York Review of Books, "Young Woman from the Provinces," 11 Feb. 2020 And nearly all public services—enrolling in school, accessing health care, registering for an electricity connection—would be contingent on possessing a digital ID. Wired Opinion, Wired, "Digital IDs Make Systemic Bias Worse," 5 Feb. 2020 The numbers are only going to increase over the next two years, with more than 71% organisations hiring more contingent workers. C.p. Gurnani, Quartz India, "What Indian millennials, companies and the government can do for the gig economy to succeed," 5 Feb. 2020 The agreement is contingent upon the rezoning, Rich said. Lorraine Longhi, azcentral, "4 Scottsdale buildings designated for office and residential could become entirely vacation rentals. City Council votes Tuesday," 14 Jan. 2020 Williams’ official appointment to the position is contingent on completion of a final background check, officials said. Richard Freedman, The Mercury News, "San Jose deputy police chief to head the Vallejo Police Department," 14 Sep. 2019 This answer assumes that the reader’s mother and boyfriend are primary (and not contingent) beneficiaries of her IRA accounts. Washington Post, "No, your IRA was never intended to be a vehicle to pass along your wealth," 6 Jan. 2020 There is no single organ system that is not contingent on microbial metabolites. Tobias Rees, Quartz, "Why tech companies need philosophers—and how I convinced Google to hire them," 22 Nov. 2019 The inclusion is contingent upon approval by the Regulations Review Committee of the Connecticut General Assembly. Sujata Srinivasan, courant.com, "Opioid backlash leaves some to struggle with chronic pain as physicians write fewer prescriptions," 13 Nov. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun This year, the small Doncic contingent has Cuban’s plane, and from a Mavericks-perspective All-Star weekend, to itself. Dallas News, "NBA All-Star starter Luka Doncic has a lot of firsts waiting for him in Chicago," 13 Feb. 2020 Germany has a small contingent of some 120 soldiers in Iraq, though the majority are not stationed in Taji and Baghdad but elsewhere in Iraq. Washington Post, "Germany, NATO moving soldiers out of Iraq amid tensions," 7 Jan. 2020 By some counts as many as 40,000 allied troops (a small contingent of Americans and a mix of Sunni Arab and Kurdish militias) confronted between 10,000 and 20,000 ISIS militants, including roughly 5,000 in the city itself. David French, National Review, "A Tale of Two Battles," 10 Oct. 2019 Except for the proclamation opposing the war criminal’s marble replica, everything was thwarted by the United States and a small contingent of its allies. Alejandro Varela, Harper's magazine, "Carlitos in Charge," 16 Sep. 2019 As the Cleveland Browns came out onto the practice field to open their 2019 training camp Thursday, a small contingent of fans chanted their names. cleveland.com, "What Odell Beckham did during Cleveland Browns training camp Day 1," 25 July 2019 Earlier in the day when the scene was calmer, a small contingent of a local 1199 SEIU chapter set up camp. Tonya Alanez, sun-sentinel.com, "Face offs get heated under blazing sun in buildup to Democratic debate," 27 June 2019 Everyone will be paying the most attention the contest for House Speaker (House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi is currently the only candidate, but there’s a small contingent of Democrats determined to vote against her). Ella Nilsen, Vox, "All the Democrats running for top spots in the House," 15 Nov. 2018 The White House had received word that only a small Eagles contingent planned to attend. Joseph Person, charlotteobserver, "Panthers' Kenjon Barner had 25,001 reasons to skip Eagles' canceled White House visit," 5 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'contingent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of contingent

Adjective

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Noun

1548, in the meaning defined at sense 2

History and Etymology for contingent

Adjective

Middle English, borrowed from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French, borrowed from Medieval Latin contingent-, contingens "dependent on circumstances, occurring by chance," going back to Latin, present participle of contingere "to be in contact with, arrive at, affect, fall to one's lot, come about, happen," from con- con- + tangere "to touch, border on, arrive at, reach" — more at tangent entry 2

Noun

(sense 1) borrowed from French, "portion that falls to one as a return, part given or received in a common effort, body of troops contributed by an ally," noun derivative of contingent, adjective, "falling to someone as a share, dependent, contingent entry 1"; (sense 2) noun derivative of contingent entry 1

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Time Traveler for contingent

Time Traveler

The first known use of contingent was in the 14th century

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Statistics for contingent

Last Updated

17 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Contingent.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/Contingents. Accessed 20 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for contingent

contingent

adjective
How to pronounce contingent (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of contingent

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : depending on something else that might or might not happen

contingent

noun

English Language Learners Definition of contingent (Entry 2 of 2)

: a group of people who go to a place together, do something together, or share some quality, interest, etc.
: a group of soldiers who come from a particular army and are working together with soldiers from other armies

contingent

adjective
con·​tin·​gent | \ kən-ˈtin-jənt How to pronounce contingent (audio) \

Kids Definition of contingent

: depending on something else that may or may not exist or occur Our trip is contingent on whether we can get tickets.

contingent

adjective
con·​tin·​gent | \ kən-ˈtin-jənt How to pronounce contingent (audio) \

Legal Definition of contingent

1 : likely but not certain to happen — compare executory
2 : intended for use in circumstances not completely foreseen a contingent fund
3 : dependent on or conditioned by something else a contingent claim a legacy contingent on the marriage — compare vested

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Comments on contingent

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