stringent

adjective
strin·​gent | \ ˈstrin-jənt How to pronounce stringent (audio) \

Definition of stringent

2 : marked by rigor, strictness, or severity especially with regard to rule or standard stringent decontamination procedures
3 : marked by money scarcity and credit strictness a stringent budget

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Other Words from stringent

stringently adverb

Choose the Right Synonym for stringent

rigid, rigorous, strict, stringent mean extremely severe or stern. rigid implies uncompromising inflexibility. rigid rules of conduct rigorous implies the imposition of hardship and difficulty. the rigorous training of recruits strict emphasizes undeviating conformity to rules, standards, or requirements. strict enforcement of the law stringent suggests severe, tight restriction or limitation. stringent standards of admission

How Should You Use stringent?

Words that are synonymous with stringent include rigid, which implies uncompromising inflexibility ("rigid rules of conduct"), and rigorous, which suggests hardship and difficulty ("the rigorous training of firefighters"). Also closely related is strict, which emphasizes undeviating conformity to rules, standards, or requirements ("strict enforcement of the law"). Stringent usually involves severe, tight restrictions or limitations ("the college has stringent admissions rules"). That's logical. After all, rigorous and rigid are both derived from rigēre, the Latin word meaning "to be stiff," and stringent and strict developed from the Latin verb stringere, meaning "to bind tight."

Examples of stringent in a Sentence

stringent rules against unauthorized persons being in the building “You’d need top grades for that,” said professor McGonagall, extracting a small, dark leaflet from under the mass on her desk and opening it. “They ask for a minimum of five N.E.W.T.s, and nothing under ‘Exceeds Expectations’ grade, I see. Then you would be required to undergo a stringent series of character and aptitude tests at the Auror office. It’s a difficult career path, Potter; they only take the best. In fact, I don’t think anybody has been taken on in the last three years.” —“Career Advice” P. 662, HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX, J. K. Rowling, Scholastic Press, Scholastic Inc., ©2003 Waugh was by then an established novelist, known for such stringent satires as Vile Bodies, Black Mischief, and his other work of the 1930s, and for Brideshead Revisited—all of which are far better known in the United States than Sword of Honour, his masterpiece. —"Books & Critics" P. 128, Penelope Lively, THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY Vol. 287 No. 2, February 2001 Throughout Canada and the United States, a beneficiary who is convicted in a criminal court proceeding of intentionally murdering the insured is disqualified from receiving life insurance policy proceeds. In many states and throughout Canada, a beneficiary who is convicted of a lesser offense––such as manslaughter––is also disqualified from receiving policy proceeds. Laws in Quebec are even more stringent; a beneficiary who attempts to kills the insured––even if that attempt is unsuccessful––is prohibited from receiving life insurance policy proceeds. —"Chapter Fourteen" P. 276, PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE: LIFE, HEALTH, AND ANNUITIES, Harriett E. Jones, JD, FLMI, ACS et al., LOMA 1996 Ellison argued in his essay “What America Would Be Like Without Blacks” that blacks, constitutive of Americanness rather than candidates for it, are the moral center of America’s complex hybrid culture. They push democratic culture toward fruition, with the most obvious test being “the inclusion—not assimilation—of the black man.” America “could not survive being deprived of their presence because, by the irony implicit in the dynamics of American democracy, they symbolize both its most stringent testing and the possibility of its greatest human freedom,” he wrote. Toni Morrison’s best-selling book of essays, Playing in the Dark, can be read as an extended meditation on Ellison’s belief in the centrality of African-Americans for American literature. “The presence of black people is inherent, along with gender and family ties, in the earliest lesson every child is taught regarding his or her distinctiveness,” she writes. “Africanism is inextricable from the definition of Americanness.” Ellison wrote, “Whatever else the true American is, he is also somehow black.” —“The New Intellectuals” P. 67, Robert S. Boynton, THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY Vol. 275 No. 3, March 1995
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Recent Examples on the Web

However, there is political support for more stringent environmental rules after a number of coal companies filed for bankruptcy in recent years. Megan Geuss, Ars Technica, "As coal stalls, Wyoming considers new environmental clean-up rules," 20 Sep. 2018 City officials said policymakers had been working with some community groups to come up with even more tweaks to keep developers building affordable apartments in hot areas, and more stringent rules are imminent. Jeff Coen, chicagotribune.com, "Key component of Emanuel affordable housing plan falls short," 22 June 2018 In ICE’s case, the agency seems to have adjusted the risk assessment algorithm to reflect a more stringent immigration policy. Chris Welch, The Verge, "NYCLU sues ICE over changes to immigrant risk assessment algorithm," 12 Dec. 2018 The Trump administration believes the state’s stringent environmental protection policies are hampering efforts by firefighters to fight the largest fire in state history. Jonathan Hunt, Fox News, "Commerce chief scolds California over environmental policies he says hinder firefighters: ‘Lives are at stake’," 9 Aug. 2018 Anyone with kids or dogs needs a stringent security policy around edibles. Robin Abrahams, BostonGlobe.com, "Miss Conduct’s common sense rules for socializing in the age of legal pot," 19 June 2018 Meanwhile, Pochettino is believed to be preparing to meet with Spurs chairman this week to discuss his future, following public criticism of the club's relatively stringent transfer policy. SI.com, "Spurs Defender Cameron Carter-Vickers Signs New Contract Until 2021 as Club Look to Build for Future," 17 May 2018 Under Hall, the scoreboard implemented a new, more stringent adjudication policy that directly led to Mitchell's lifetime ban, thanks to frame-by-frame analysis of video evidence. Kyle Orland, Ars Technica, "Billy Mitchell says he’s “not going to stop now” after scoreboard ban [Updated]," 17 Apr. 2018 The measure, Assembly Bill 748, would bar local governments from establishing employment policies more stringent than state law, including provisions aimed at encouraging hiring local residents. Patrick Marley, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Foxconn: Bill limiting local governments could hurt Racine County hiring for jobs related to massive plant," 19 Mar. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stringent.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stringent

1736, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for stringent

Latin stringent-, stringens, present participle of stringere

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Last Updated

12 Mar 2019

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Time Traveler for stringent

The first known use of stringent was in 1736

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More Definitions for stringent

stringent

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of stringent

: very strict or severe

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More from Merriam-Webster on stringent

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stringent

Spanish Central: Translation of stringent

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