collaborate

verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Definition of collaborate

intransitive verb

1 : to work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor An international team of scientists collaborated on the study.
2 : to cooperate with or willingly assist an enemy of one's country and especially an occupying force suspected of collaborating with the enemy
3 : to cooperate with an agency or instrumentality with which one is not immediately connected The two schools collaborate on library services.

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Other Words from collaborate

collaboration \ kə-​ˌla-​bə-​ˈrā-​shən How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \ noun
collaborative \ kə-​ˈla-​bə-​ˌrā-​tiv , -​b(ə-​)rə-​ How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \ adjective or noun
collaboratively \ kə-​ˈla-​bə-​ˌrā-​tiv-​lē How to pronounce collaborate (audio) , -​b(ə-​)rə-​ \ adverb

Did You Know?

The Latin prefix com-, meaning "with, together, or jointly," is a bit of a chameleon - it has a tricky habit of changing its appearance depending on what it's next to. If the word it precedes begins with "l," "com-" becomes "col-." In the case of collaborate, com- teamed up with laborare ("to labor") to form Late Latin collaborare ("to labor together"). Colleague, collect, and collide are a few more examples of the "com-" to "col-" transformation. Other descendants of laborare in English include elaborate,- _laboratory, and labor itself.

Examples of collaborate in a Sentence

The two companies agreed to collaborate. He was suspected of collaborating with the occupying army.
Recent Examples on the Web Based on what those experts find, the WHO will then deploy an international team in China to collaborate with many of the country’s top scientists in tracing COVID-19’s roots. Larry Mullin, National Geographic, "The WHO is hunting for the coronavirus’s origins. Here are the new details.," 6 Nov. 2020 Her approach to writing these songs was decidedly different than those early ones, though, using Zoom to collaborate with other writers and producers. Ed Masley, The Arizona Republic, "How Taylor Upsahl found 2020's 'silver lining' while quarantining in her childhood bedroom," 5 Nov. 2020 In that case, the virus had indeed infected the placenta, and Lu-Culligan began to collaborate with Yale obstetricians to recruit women delivering at the hospital who were positive for the virus to study their placentas, too. Jennifer Couzin-frankel, Science | AAAS, "‘Every minute counts.’ This immunologist rapidly reshaped her lab to tackle COVID-19," 27 Oct. 2020 Basson said employees with disabilities like chronic pain or motor impairments no longer have to manage a commute or come into the office to collaborate with their colleagues. Chase Difeliciantonio, SFChronicle.com, "How blind Google engineer handles challenge of working remotely," 28 Dec. 2020 Are there plans to collaborate with each other in a film? New York Times, "For His Second Act, Nnamdi Asomugha Made Preparation His Byword," 28 Dec. 2020 Marvina Robinson, a longtime lover of Champagne, was inspired to collaborate with a Champagne producer to create her own exclusive label for her forthcoming Champagne bar concept, Coupette NYC. Céline Bossart, NBC News, "The 5 best champagnes of 2020 to celebrate New Year's Eve," 22 Dec. 2020 Capella plans to collaborate with these users to make the insights from their product more valuable in multiple sectors. Tim Fernholz, Quartz, "A startup is teaching the US military how to make space radar cheap," 17 Dec. 2020 And to get answers, machine learning scientists need to collaborate far more with other stakeholders. Jeremy Kahn, Fortune, "A.I. needs to get real—and other takeways from this year’s NeurIPS," 15 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'collaborate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of collaborate

1871, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for collaborate

Late Latin collaboratus, past participle of collaborare to labor together, from Latin com- + laborare to labor — more at labor

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Time Traveler for collaborate

Time Traveler

The first known use of collaborate was in 1871

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Statistics for collaborate

Last Updated

10 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Collaborate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/collaborate. Accessed 21 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for collaborate

collaborate

verb
How to pronounce collaborate (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of collaborate

: to work with another person or group in order to achieve or do something
disapproving : to give help to an enemy who has invaded your country during a war

collaborate

verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Kids Definition of collaborate

1 : to work with others (as in writing a book)
2 : to cooperate with an enemy force that has taken over a person's country

collaborate

intransitive verb
col·​lab·​o·​rate | \ kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt How to pronounce collaborate (audio) \
collaborated; collaborating

Legal Definition of collaborate

: to work jointly with others in some endeavor

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Comments on collaborate

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