wrangle

verb
wran·​gle | \ˈraŋ-gəl \
wrangled; wrangling\ˈraŋ-​g(ə-​)liŋ \

Definition of wrangle 

(Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to dispute angrily or peevishly : bicker

2 : to engage in argument or controversy

transitive verb

1 : to obtain by persistent arguing or maneuvering : wangle

2 [ back-formation from wrangler ] : to herd and care for (livestock and especially horses) on the range

wrangle

noun

Definition of wrangle (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an angry, noisy, or prolonged dispute or quarrel

2 : the action or process of wrangling

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Choose the Right Synonym for wrangle

Noun

quarrel, wrangle, altercation, squabble mean a noisy dispute usually marked by anger. quarrel implies heated verbal contention, stressing strained or severed relations which may persist beyond the contention. a quarrel nearly destroyed the relationship wrangle suggests undignified and often futile disputation with a noisy insistence on differing opinions. wrangle interminably about small issues altercation implies fighting with words as the chief weapon, although it may also connote blows. a loud public altercation squabble stresses childish and unseemly dispute over petty matters, but it need not imply bitterness or anger. a brief squabble over what to do next

Examples of wrangle in a Sentence

Verb

They were wrangling over money. He made a living wrangling horses.

Noun

They had a bitter wrangle over custody of their children. there was a bit of a wrangle over how much money to give the high school for its sports programs
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

For investors, legal wrangling with such borrowers is common. Cezary Podkul, WSJ, "‘I Can Be the Bank’: Individual Investors Buy Busted Mortgages," 20 Nov. 2018 The tight returns and potential runoff come after weeks of wrangling over Georgia’s election system and Kemp’s performance as its chief executive. Bill Barrow, The Seattle Times, "Ballot count not yet finished in Georgia governor’s race," 7 Nov. 2018 One difficulty is having to wrangle with insurance companies that deny payment for tests and procedures that their policies seem to cover. Robert H. Frank, New York Times, "Would a Single-Payer System Require Painful Sacrifices From Doctors?," 8 June 2018 There’s nothing worse than being in the middle of an intense gaming or spreadsheet-wrangling session and a power outage kills it. Ian Paul, PCWorld, "Protect against outages with this $35, six outlet uninterruptible power supply," 9 Oct. 2018 While beekeeping in many cities falls to animal-control departments, in New York City police are tasked with wrangling swarms. Zolan Kanno-youngs, WSJ, "NYPD Handles ‘Sting’ Operation in Times Square," 28 Aug. 2018 After all, the bike industry is still wrangling over hub widths and disc-mount configurations, and the automotive industry hasn’t yet settled on vehicle-to-vehicle communications standards. Aaron Gulley, Outside Online, "Can Ford and Trek Save Cyclists' Lives?," 16 May 2018 Those that are growing roughly in the right direction will be kept and tethered along the fence, and those that cannot be wrangled will be removed. Adrian Higgins, sacbee, "As for beauty and fragrance, the rambler comes up roses," 15 June 2018 For months, Commissioners Court had been wrangling over the logistics of holding a bond election, including the cost of holding a special election and when the ideal time would be to ensure voters turn out to support the measure. Mihir Zaveri, Houston Chronicle, "Harris County to consider Aug. 25 for flood control bond referendum," 27 Apr. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

In other action, two undefeated teams, England and Belgium, wrangle for control of Group G at 2 p.m. on Fox. Andrew R. Chow, New York Times, "What’s on TV Thursday: ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ and ‘CMT Crossroads’," 28 June 2018 Internationally, movie-goers have spent $1 billion to watch Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard wrangle pterodactyls. Randall Roberts, latimes.com, "Box office: 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' skitters to the top, 'Incredibles 2' leaps past $500 million," 8 July 2018 By agreeing to a four-year contract, announced Sunday night, LeBron James took the biggest gamble of his career – and one not guaranteed to pay off even if the Lakers somehow manage to wrangle Kawhi Leonard from the San Antonio Spurs. Nancy Armour, USA TODAY, "Lakers hope LeBron will help them reclaim spotlight of Showtime era," 2 July 2018 In a protracted wrangle over Michael's estate, Joe was ultimately cut out of executorship and any share of his most famous son's earnings. Chris Morris, chicagotribune.com, "Joe Jackson, patriarch of America's most famous musical clan, father of Michael Jackson, dead at 89," 27 June 2018 While the public wrangles with how to avoid answering the phone, there is one area in which calls are thriving. Janelle Nanos, BostonGlobe.com, "Stop answering your phone," 6 Jan. 2018 Despite the ongoing wrangle over Sarri's release clause, an announcement is expected to be made over the next 48 hours that will see the former Empoli manager take over the reins from fellow Italian, Antonio Conte. SI.com, "Chelsea Offer €4m for Maurizio Sarri While Ex-Napoli Boss Eyes Blues Legend for Backroom Staff," 28 May 2018 Not only does this help the tone and texture of your skin, massage can also refine pores, clear out congestion, and wrangle breakouts. Deanna Pai, Glamour, "I Worked Out My Face for a Week, and It Was Exhausting," 17 May 2018 Our #BattalionChief helped @BoiseFire & @PoliceMeridian wrangle Ricky the bull, near Locust Grove & Ustick in #Boise. Dana Oland, idahostatesman, "A bull goes roaming in Meridian. Here's how he made his way home. | Idaho Statesman," 15 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wrangle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wrangle

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for wrangle

Verb

Middle English; akin to Old High German ringan to struggle — more at wring

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Learn More about wrangle

Statistics for wrangle

Last Updated

10 Dec 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for wrangle

The first known use of wrangle was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for wrangle

wrangle

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wrangle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to argue angrily with someone

: to get (something) by clever methods or by persuading someone

: to control and care for (horses, cattle, etc.) on a ranch

wrangle

noun

English Language Learners Definition of wrangle (Entry 2 of 2)

: a dispute that lasts for a long time

wrangle

verb
wran·​gle | \ˈraŋ-gəl \
wrangled; wrangling

Kids Definition of wrangle

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : to argue angrily

2 : to care for and herd livestock and especially horses

wrangle

noun

Kids Definition of wrangle (Entry 2 of 2)

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More from Merriam-Webster on wrangle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with wrangle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for wrangle

Spanish Central: Translation of wrangle

Nglish: Translation of wrangle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of wrangle for Arabic Speakers

Comments on wrangle

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