wring

verb
\ ˈriŋ \
wrung\ ˈrəŋ \; wringing\ ˈriŋ-​iŋ \

Definition of wring

transitive verb

1 : to squeeze or twist especially so as to make dry or to extract moisture or liquid wring a towel dry
2 : to extract or obtain by or as if by twisting and compressing wring water from a towel wring a confession from the suspect
3a : to twist so as to strain or sprain into a distorted shape I could wring your neck
b : to twist together (clasped hands) as a sign of anguish
4 : to affect painfully as if by wringing : torment a tragedy that wrings the heart

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Other Words from wring

wring noun

Synonyms for wring

Synonyms

exact, extort, wrest

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Examples of wring in a Sentence

I wrung the towel and hung it up to dry. I wrung my hair and wrapped it in a towel.

Recent Examples on the Web

This is why friends of the region’s hard left are wringing their hands and crying that the Treasury rules will hurt the Venezuelan people. Mary Anastasia O’grady, WSJ, "Power and Money in Venezuela," 10 Feb. 2019 Readers of Today's WorldView know there's no shortage of hand-wringing about the current state of liberal democracy. Ishaan Tharoor, Washington Post, "Washington wakes up to ‘authoritarian’ populism in the U.S. and Europe," 10 May 2018 There has been some hand-wringing about the fired men: that a mass of male talent is departing the industry. Audie Cornish, New York Times, "Christiane Amanpour Believes in the Power of Local News," 24 Jan. 2018 As a regent, Shanahan was known for bringing a heightened focus on wringing the most out of the university’s spending, according to a review of university records and interviews with people who know him. Michelle Baruchman, The Seattle Times, "Trump pick for acting defense secretary brings a knack for complex issues honed at UW, Boeing," 24 Dec. 2018 Gottlieb said the agency will soon tap the public for comments on the terminology and hopes to wring out a new policy within a year. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, "“An almond doesn’t lactate:” FDA to crack down on use of the word “milk”," 18 July 2018 Wipe each area with a cloth dipped in clear water and wrung out. Arianne Cohen, Woman's Day, "Time-Saving Household Cleaning Tricks," 21 Nov. 2011 The first and most obvious is that the iPhone has become boring, trapped by the diminishing returns Apple can wring out of the device year after year. Nick Statt, The Verge, "The Apple Watch stole the show from this year’s new iPhones," 15 Sep. 2018 That causes some surface air warming, which also gives a lifting boost that wrings moisture out of the air. Scott K. Johnson, Ars Technica, "Carpeting Sahara with wind and solar farms could make it rain," 8 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'wring.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of wring

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for wring

Middle English, from Old English wringan; akin to Old High German ringan to struggle, Lithuanian rengtis to bend down, Old English wyrgan to strangle — more at worry

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Statistics for wring

Last Updated

16 Feb 2019

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Time Traveler for wring

The first known use of wring was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for wring

wring

verb

English Language Learners Definition of wring

: to twist and squeeze (wet cloth, hair, etc.) to remove water
: to get (something) out of someone or something with a lot of effort
: to twist and break (an animal's neck) in order to kill the animal

wring

verb
\ ˈriŋ \
wrung\ ˈrəŋ \; wringing

Kids Definition of wring

1 : to twist or press so as to squeeze out moisture Wring out your bathing suit.
2 : to get by or as if by twisting or pressing Police wrung a confession from the criminal.
3 : to twist with a forceful or violent motion He wrung the chicken's neck.
4 : to affect as if by wringing The bad news wrung our hearts.
5 : to twist (hands) together as a sign of anguish

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More from Merriam-Webster on wring

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with wring

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for wring

Spanish Central: Translation of wring

Nglish: Translation of wring for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of wring for Arabic Speakers

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