angle

noun (1)
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Definition of angle

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1 : a corner whether constituting a projecting part or a partially enclosed space They sheltered in an angle of the building.
2a : the figure formed by two lines extending from the same point also : dihedral angle
b : a measure of an angle or of the amount of turning necessary to bring one line or plane into coincidence with or parallel to another
3a : the direction from which someone or something is approached soldiers being attacked from every angle a football player trying to get an angle on an opponent [=approach an opponent from an effective angle]
b : the precise viewpoint from which something is observed or considered a camera angle consider the question from all angles also : the aspect seen from such an angle discuss all angles of the question
c(1) : a special approach, point of attack, or technique for accomplishing an objective try a new angle
(2) : an often improper or illicit method of obtaining advantage a salesman always looking for an angle
4 : a sharply divergent course The road went off at an angle.

angle

verb (1)
angled; angling\ ˈaŋ-​g(ə-​)liŋ How to pronounce angling (audio) \

Definition of angle (Entry 2 of 4)

intransitive verb

: to turn or proceed at an angle The road angles up the hill.

transitive verb

1 : to turn, move, or direct at an angle slipped the key in and angled it to one side
2 : to present (something, such as a news story) from a particular or prejudiced point of view : slant angled stories toward the newspaper's political preferences

angle

verb (2)
angled; angling

Definition of angle (Entry 3 of 4)

intransitive verb

1 : to fish with a hook
2 : to use artful means to attain an objective angled for an invitation

Angle

noun (2)
An·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce Angle (audio) \

Definition of Angle (Entry 4 of 4)

: a member of a Germanic people that invaded England along with the Saxons and Jutes in the fifth century a.d. and merged with them to form the Anglo-Saxon peoples

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Other Words from angle

Noun (1)

angled \ ˈaŋ-​gəld How to pronounce angled (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms for angle

Synonyms: Noun (1)

Synonyms: Verb (1)

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Examples of angle in a Sentence

Noun (1) The lines are at sharp angles to each other. Critics love the clever camera angles the director used in the film. She took pictures of the same scene from several different angles. The soldiers were being attacked from every angle. We need to approach the problem from a new angle. They considered the question from all angles. The reporter tried to work that angle into his story.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Use it as a vocal mic stand, or adjust the angle and height to accommodate other instruments like guitar amps or a set of drums. Billy Cadden, Popular Science, "Home studio gear to help scratch your musical itch," 5 Feb. 2020 Mahomes has mesmerized with no-look passes, lefty tosses and all sorts of arm angles. Hayes Gardner, The Courier-Journal, "Morning Coffee: Patrick Mahomes is a reminder of what could be ahead for Lamar Jackson," 4 Feb. 2020 Jones is confident that NBC News and MSNBC are well-positioned to cover the Iowa caucus thoroughly, authoritatively and from a multitude of angles and perspectives. Jeremy Barr, The Hollywood Reporter, ""We're Ready to Go": Iowa Caucus Signals 2020 Kickoff for Television News Networks," 3 Feb. 2020 Reading gimbal angles and accelerometer data from the spacecraft's inertial measurement unit took only a few machine instructions, but this work drove computations that propagated throughout the guidance, navigation, and control software. Frank O’brien, Ars Technica, "A deep dive into the Apollo Guidance Computer, and the hack that saved Apollo 14," 30 Jan. 2020 Lower the left leg down to a 45-degree angle, and curl up so that your left elbow reaches towards your right straight leg. Stephanie Mansour, NBC News, "Crunched for time? Here is a 5, 10, 20 and 30-minute workout for busy days," 22 Jan. 2020 One of these kids is Issa (Issa Perica, in a taut, beautifully understated performance), a boy of 11 or so whose body is all angles and elbows, his hair shaped into an unfashionable point. Stephanie Zacharek, Time, "France's Oscar Entry Les Misérables Is an Invigorating Tale of Poverty and Revolt," 10 Jan. 2020 Next up is the Taliesin West set, which highlight the structure’s angles and unique floor plan. Kelly Allen, House Beautiful, "You Can Build Frank Lloyd Wright’s Most Iconic Structures With These Lego-Like Kits," 8 Jan. 2020 His arrival is approached from a variety of angles, foremost among them the concerned and skeptical US. Brian Lowry, CNN, "'Messiah' asks provocative questions, without giving many answers," 30 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Brunch looked great before your friends whipped out their iPhones, angling for perfect shots of their avocado toast as yours went cold. Laura Mallonee, Wired, "The History of Food Photos—From Still Lifes to Brunch 'Grams," 29 Jan. 2020 And yet, for all that glad commotion, this angel angled for promotion. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, "A Christmas sports poem: Clarence earns an encore, and his halo," 24 Dec. 2019 As the sun sinks behind the Tennessee mountains, and stars wink into view, astronomer Doug Durig climbs onto the rooftop of his observatory, powers up his three telescopes and angles them skyward. Sarah Kaplan, Anchorage Daily News, "An alien comet from another star is soaring through our solar system," 28 Nov. 2019 Federal prosecutors in the District of Columbia have embraced politically fraught cases under the United States attorney, Jessie K. Liu, an ambitious prosecutor who has angled for bigger jobs in the Trump administration. Adam Goldman, New York Times, "Justice Dept. Investigating Years-Old Leaks and Appears Focused on Comey," 16 Jan. 2020 Mulvaney’s allies worried that White House counsel Pat Cipollone was angling for his job. Zeke Miller, The Denver Post, "Inside impeachment: How an “urgent” tip became “high crimes”," 22 Dec. 2019 Salome, who was angling for a new husband, inserted herself into the drama and claimed that Mariamne and Joseph had been having an affair in the king’s absence. Anne Thériault, Longreads, "Queens of Infamy: Mariamne I," 18 Dec. 2019 As in that case, prosecutors are angling to make Weinstein’s trial a referendum on his behavior with women over many decades, not just in the two instances that led to criminal charges. Michael R. Sisak, BostonGlobe.com, "Weinstein’s reckoning: Trial looms 2 years after #MeToo wave," 5 Jan. 2020 Unlike most lightsabers, the blade of the Darksaber is angled and looks more like a sword. Eliana Dockterman, Time, "The Darksaber Made a Crucial Appearance in The Mandalorian's Season Finale. Here's Its Significance in Star Wars Lore," 28 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Especially, stop angling for some magic way to exclude her that won’t reflect poorly on you. Carolyn Hax, Washington Post, "Carolyn Hax: The question is, is there room in your heart for your stepdaughter?," 9 Feb. 2020 This season, Mercer will return to Detroit, angling for a backup shortstop or bench position. Anthony Fenech, Detroit Free Press, "Detroit Tigers bring back shortstop Jordy Mercer on minor-league deal," 30 Jan. 2020 Brunch looked great before your friends whipped out their iPhones, angling for perfect shots of their avocado toast as yours went cold. Laura Mallonee, Wired, "The History of Food Photos—From Still Lifes to Brunch 'Grams," 29 Jan. 2020 The league played regular-season games in Japan and angled for a foothold in China. Dan Woike, Los Angeles Times, "David Stern, NBA commissioner who oversaw global growth, dies at 77," 1 Jan. 2020 And yet, for all that glad commotion, this angel angled for promotion. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, "A Christmas sports poem: Clarence earns an encore, and his halo," 24 Dec. 2019 Fans were everywhere along the parade route, which took three hours to complete, all angling for the best view. Mary Kilpatrick, cleveland, "2016, the year the Cavs won the championship and the RNC came to CLE: Biggest stories of the 2010s," 23 Dec. 2019 Mulvaney’s allies worried that White House counsel Pat Cipollone was angling for his job. Zeke Miller, The Denver Post, "Inside impeachment: How an “urgent” tip became “high crimes”," 22 Dec. 2019 Salome, who was angling for a new husband, inserted herself into the drama and claimed that Mariamne and Joseph had been having an affair in the king’s absence. Anne Thériault, Longreads, "Queens of Infamy: Mariamne I," 18 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'angle.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of angle

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Verb (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for angle

Noun (1)

Middle English, "corner, recess, two lines extending from the same point," borrowed from Anglo-French angle, aungle, going back to Latin angulus "two lines extending from the same point, corner, nook," going back to Indo-European *h2eng-lo-, *h2eng-elo-, whence also Old Church Slavic ǫgŭlŭ "corner, angle," Russian úgol, genitive uglá, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian ȕgao, ȕgla, Armenian ankiwn, and perhaps Germanic *ankula-, *ankila- ankle

Verb (1)

Middle English anglen "to meet at an angle," derivative of angle angle entry 1

Verb (2)

Middle English anglen, derivative of angel "fishhook," going back to Old English angel, ongel, going back to Germanic *angula- "hook, barb" (whence also Old Saxon angul "fishhook," Old High German, "hook, barb," Old Norse ǫngull "fishhook"), going back to Indo-European *h2enk-ul-ó-, derivative, perhaps diminutive, of a base *h2enk- seen also in the n-stem noun *h2enk-ón- (whence Old English anga "prick, goad," Old High German ango "sting, barb, door hinge," Greek ankṓn "bend, elbow"), suffixed in Greek ankýlos "bent, crooked, curved," and as an o-grade derivative in Greek ónkos "barb of an arrow," Latin uncus "curved at the extremities, hooked, a hook," and probably Sanskrit aṅkáḥ "curve, hook"; *h2enk- perhaps attested as a primary verb in Sanskrit áñcati, ácati "(it) bends, curves"

Note: Indo-European *h2enk- appears to be synonymous with the base *h2eng- —see angle entry 1, ankle.

Noun (2)

Latin Angli, plural, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English Engle Angles

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Time Traveler for angle

Time Traveler

The first known use of angle was in the 14th century

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Statistics for angle

Last Updated

12 Feb 2020

Cite this Entry

“Angle.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/angle. Accessed 17 Feb. 2020.

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More Definitions for angle

angle

noun
How to pronounce Angle (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of angle

: the difference between the direction of two lines or surfaces that come together : the space or shape formed when two lines or surfaces meet each other
used to describe a surface that is not level
used to describe something that leans or goes to the side rather than straight up or directly forward

angle

noun
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Kids Definition of angle

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : the figure formed by two lines meeting at a point
2 : point of view Let's consider the problem from a new angle.
3 : a sharp corner They stood in an angle of the building.
4 : the slanting direction in which something is positioned The road goes off on an angle.

angle

verb
angled; angling

Kids Definition of angle (Entry 2 of 3)

: to turn, move, or point in a direction that is not straight or flat The spotlight was angled down toward the floor.

angle

verb
angled; angling

Kids Definition of angle (Entry 3 of 3)

1 : to fish with hook and line
2 : to try to get something in a sly way He's always angling for a compliment.

angle

noun
an·​gle | \ ˈaŋ-gəl How to pronounce angle (audio) \

Medical Definition of angle

1 : a corner whether constituting a projecting part or a partially enclosed space
2a : the figure formed by two lines extending from the same point
b : a measure of an angle or of the amount of turning necessary to bring one line or plane into coincidence with or parallel to another

Other Words from angle

angled \ -​gəld How to pronounce angled (audio) \ adjective

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More from Merriam-Webster on angle

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for angle

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with angle

Spanish Central: Translation of angle

Nglish: Translation of angle for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of angle for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about angle

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