uproot

verb

uprooted; uprooting; uproots

transitive verb

1
: to remove as if by pulling up
2
: to pull up by the roots
3
: to displace from a country or traditional habitat
uprootedness noun
uprooter noun
Choose the Right Synonym for uproot

exterminate, extirpate, eradicate, uproot mean to effect the destruction or abolition of something.

exterminate implies complete and immediate extinction by killing off all individuals.

exterminate cockroaches

extirpate implies extinction of a race, family, species, or sometimes an idea or doctrine by destruction or removal of its means of propagation.

many species have been extirpated from the area

eradicate implies the driving out or elimination of something that has established itself.

a campaign to eradicate illiteracy

uproot implies a forcible or violent removal and stresses displacement or dislodgment rather than immediate destruction.

the war uprooted thousands

Example Sentences

Many trees were uprooted by the storm. Will we ever be able to uproot racial prejudice? Taking the job would mean uprooting my family.
Recent Examples on the Web Being able to move into a space of defiant intimacy and uproot each other and develop this begrudging respect for each other and a weird, twisted, dark, perhaps love, was just fascinating to me. Samantha Highfill, EW.com, 23 Nov. 2022 This is the time of year when Alaska’s migratory birds uproot and move to warmer places. Emily Mesner, Anchorage Daily News, 30 Oct. 2022 Now came the time to uproot the last nine years of my life to move. Jamie L. Lareau, Detroit Free Press, 22 Oct. 2022 In the region of Isère, winegrower Nicolas Gonin said his decision to uproot the Pinot Noir and Chardonnay vines planted decades ago and replace them with local varieties was vindicated this year. Nick Kostov, WSJ, 25 Sep. 2022 But the Turkish government quickly began to cut down and uproot them, salvaging the marketable timber. Katie Nadworny, The Atlantic, 28 Oct. 2022 The plan would uproot at least 300 businesses that employ more than 24,000 people and destroy 1,400 homes, according to NBC affiliate KXAS. Char Adams, NBC News, 15 Oct. 2022 Officials warn that such storms can uproot trees, damage wood-frame houses and cause power outages of days to weeks. Matthew Cappucci, Washington Post, 25 Sep. 2022 His father was a truck driver and would frequently quit his job or get fired and uproot his family. Ivana Hrynkiw | Ihrynkiw@al.com, al, 22 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'uproot.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

First Known Use

circa 1620, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of uproot was circa 1620

Dictionary Entries Near uproot

Cite this Entry

“Uproot.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/uproot. Accessed 9 Dec. 2022.

Kids Definition

uproot

verb
: to remove by or as if by pulling up by the roots
uproot a vine
families uprooted by war

More from Merriam-Webster on uproot

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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