toast

noun
\ ˈtōst How to pronounce toast (audio) \

Definition of toast

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : sliced bread browned on both sides by heat
b : food prepared with toasted bread
2 : an act of proposing or of drinking in honor of a toast
3 slang : one that is finished or done for soon their relationship was toast— Rick Reilly
4 : a rhyming narrative poem existing in oral tradition among Black Americans
5
a(1) : a person whose health is drunk
(2) : something in honor of which persons usually drink
b : one that is highly admired she's the toast of society

toast

verb (1)
toasted; toasting; toasts

Definition of toast (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to make (food, such as bread) crisp, hot, and brown by heat
2 : to warm thoroughly

intransitive verb

: to become toasted especially : to warm thoroughly

toast

verb (2)
toasted; toasting; toasts

Definition of toast (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to propose or drink to as a toast

Examples of toast in a Sentence

Noun I had toast for breakfast. He made a toast to the bride and groom. Everyone drank a toast to the bride and groom.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Jenny showed us around the city, taught us the German word for toast (prost!), and introduced us to the German drink Radler, which is essentially a mixture of beer and lemonade. Vanessa Wilkins, Travel + Leisure, "My Trip to Oktoberfest Was Canceled — Here’s How I Celebrated at Home," 2 Oct. 2020 The touchscreen appliance has a 1,500-watt cooking system with a convection oven and 11 pre-programmed functions: air-fry, bagel, bake, broil, cookies, dehydrate, pizza, reheat, toast, slow cook, and warm. Jennifer Aldrich, Better Homes & Gardens, "You'll Want To Shop Everything from Drew Barrymore's Stylish New Kitchen Appliance Collection," 29 Mar. 2021 Most major trees around North Texas made it through the cold snap fairly well (with some exceptions), but many shrubs are toast — Indian hawthorn, pittosporum, Japanese and wax ligustrum, Chinese fringe flower and agaves are pretty much wiped out. Howard Garrett, Dallas News, "As spring plants begin to bloom, a damage report from D-FW’s winter storm," 29 Mar. 2021 Forget boring, bleary-eyed toast and embrace the effortlessness of premade frittata, porridge, breakfast cake (!), and more. Ali Francis, Bon Appétit, "75 Make-Ahead Breakfasts the Sleepyheads Will Love," 19 Mar. 2021 On this chilly night in October 2019, Erin French comes out of the open kitchen into the rustic dining room and, in keeping with the restaurant’s convivial atmosphere, greets her guests with a toast. Washington Post, "How the Lost Kitchen, one of the nation’s hardest-to-book restaurants, survived a lost year," 15 Mar. 2021 That distinction belongs to Coulombe's labor-intensive version of rusk, the Swedish cinnamon toast-like (and hygge-inducing) delicacy. Rick Nelson, Star Tribune, "Minnesota's best doughnut? Food & Wine magazine says it's in Lindstrom," 8 Feb. 2021 The Rosen Shingle Creek’s New Year’s Eve dining schedule runs from 5:30–10 p.m. and kicks off with a toast for a spectacular 2021. Amy Drew Thompson, orlandosentinel.com, "Ring in 2021 with a bang & a bite," 23 Dec. 2020 To get a steady release of energy all morning long, eat a meal that combines protein and carbohydrates: peanut butter on a bagel, leftover cheese pizza, an energy bar, cereal or an egg with whole-wheat toast. Tehrene Firman, Redbook, "14 Surprising Things That Are Making You Tired," 20 Oct. 2017 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Today’s oenophiles who revel in a pinot noir from Patagonia, a chardonnay from Tasmania, a riesling from Michigan’s Old Mission Peninsula, even the traditional qvevri wines of Georgia now in vogue, should raise a glass and toast Spurrier. Washington Post, "Steven Spurrier blew up the wine world with the Judgment of Paris. His legacy lives on.," 19 Mar. 2021 Use a fork to split, then toast until edges are light golden brown. Sara Tane, Good Housekeeping, "How to Make English Muffins From Scratch," 12 Mar. 2021 During the program, one person after another got up to laud and toast Jacob. Norman B. Gildin, sun-sentinel.com, "When humor isn’t funny | Opinion," 26 Feb. 2021 Butter the bread slices and toast them in a skillet on medium heat, turning frequently, until golden. Paul Stephen, San Antonio Express-News, "Recipe: Monticello White Bean Soup," 10 Feb. 2021 Why wouldn’t Rwandans be happy to host him, toast him, solicit his advice and benefit from his lifetime of service, experience, knowledge, etc. . . . John Edgar Wideman, The New Yorker, "Rwanda," 7 Dec. 2020 Place the pine nuts on a rimmed baking sheet, and place over the direct heat to toast them. Chuck Blount, ExpressNews.com, "Recipe: Smoked Pesto Wings," 25 Jan. 2021 In the past, my partner and I have raised our glasses of sparkling water to toast Dry January with all the smug momentum the first few weeks of a New Year typically brings. Lizz Schumer, Good Housekeeping, "This Year, I'm Choosing Mindfulness Over Dry January," 22 Jan. 2021 When the cold returns, those fresh green leaves and sprouts will be toast. Beth Botts, chicagotribune.com, "Frozen soil is fine for gardens in winter, but mulching is important for another reason," 13 Dec. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb And when that day comes, Mills is almost certain to toast it with a cold one. Jeff Mcdonald, San Antonio Express-News, "A year later, Spurs, NBA learning to live with COVID-19 virus," 13 Mar. 2021 Place the pine nuts on a rimmed baking sheet, and place over the direct heat to toast them. Chuck Blount, ExpressNews.com, "Recipe: Smoked Pesto Wings," 25 Jan. 2021 Working in two batches, open the rolls and toast them, buttered sides down, until golden, 60 to 90 seconds. Washington Post, "Give in to pandemic cravings, starting with a homemade cheesesteak sandwich," 10 Dec. 2020 Why wouldn’t Rwandans be happy to host him, toast him, solicit his advice and benefit from his lifetime of service, experience, knowledge, etc. . . . John Edgar Wideman, The New Yorker, "Rwanda," 7 Dec. 2020 Mistletoe potential: Eh, not so much—but at least toast yourself with a glass of champagne. Gena Kaufman, Glamour, "27 Christmas Love Songs, Ranked in Terms of Their Mistletoe Potential," 2 Dec. 2020 Today’s oenophiles who revel in a pinot noir from Patagonia, a chardonnay from Tasmania, a riesling from Michigan’s Old Mission Peninsula, even the traditional qvevri wines of Georgia now in vogue, should raise a glass and toast Spurrier. Washington Post, "Steven Spurrier blew up the wine world with the Judgment of Paris. His legacy lives on.," 19 Mar. 2021 Use a fork to split, then toast until edges are light golden brown. Sara Tane, Good Housekeeping, "How to Make English Muffins From Scratch," 12 Mar. 2021 During the program, one person after another got up to laud and toast Jacob. Norman B. Gildin, sun-sentinel.com, "When humor isn’t funny | Opinion," 26 Feb. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'toast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of toast

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

Verb (2)

1700, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for toast

Noun

Middle English toste, toost, noun derivative of tosten "to toast entry 2"; (sense 2) noun derivative of toast entry 3

Note: The word toast in the sense "a person whose health is drunk," with the accompanying verb "to propose or drink to (a person) as a toast," first appears in print at the very end of the seventeenth century. The conventional assumption is that the use is metaphorical, "the name of a lady being supposed to flavour a bumper like a spiced toast in the drink," as it is expressed in the Oxford English Dictionary, first edition. This is pure speculation, however, as the origin of the sense remains obscure. Two oft-quoted explanations appear in Richard steele entry b's journal The Tatler, which appeared between April, 1709 and January, 1711. The first is in No. 24 (June 4, 1709), probably written by Joseph addison entry b: "To know what a toast is in the country gives as much perplexity as she herself does in town: and indeed the learned differ very much upon the original of this word, and the acceptation of it among the moderns…But many of the wits of the last age will assert that the word, in its present sense, was known among them in their youth, and had its rise from an accident in the town of Bath, in the reign of King Charles the Second. It happen'd, that on a publick day a celebrated beauty of those times was in the Cross Bath, and one of the croud of her admirers took a glass of the water in which the fair one stood, and drank her health to the company. There was in the place a gay fellow half fuddled who offered to jump in, and swore tho' he liked not the liquor, he would have the toast [alluding to a drink with toast dipped in it]. He was opposed in his resolution; yet this whim gave foundation to the present honour which is done to the lady we mention in our liquors, who has ever since been called a toast." Another allusion to an origin, in No. 31 (June 21, 1709) by Richard Steele, makes no mention of the earlier story: "Then, said he [a gentleman in the country unfamiliar with the word], why do you call live people toasts? I answered, that was a new name found out by the wits, to make a lady have the same effect as burridge [borage, used as a garnish or ingredient in cordials] in a glass, when a man is drinking." As both Addison and Steele were capable of mixing fact with invention, these anecdotes should probably not be taken too seriously.

Verb (1)

Middle English tosten "to darken by heat, crisp and darken bread by heat," borrowed from Anglo-French toster, tostir (also continental Old French), going back to Late Latin tostāre "to roast, grill," frequentative derivative of Latin torrēre, past participle tostus (going back to *tors(e)tos) "to heat so as to dry, scorch, parch, (of food) roast" — more at thirst entry 1

Verb (2)

derivative of toast entry 1 (sense 5)

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Time Traveler for toast

Time Traveler

The first known use of toast was in the 14th century

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Statistics for toast

Last Updated

13 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Toast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/toast. Accessed 13 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for toast

toast

verb
\ ˈtōst How to pronounce toast (audio) \
toasted; toasting

Kids Definition of toast

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : to make (food) crisp, hot, and brown by heat toast bread toast cheese
2 : to warm completely Their bare toes toasted in the heat from the fire.— Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie

toast

noun

Kids Definition of toast (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : sliced bread made crisp, hot, and brown by heat
2 : an act of drinking in honor of a person
3 : a person in whose honor other people drink
4 : a highly admired person He's the toast of the town.

toast

verb
toasted; toasting

Kids Definition of toast (Entry 3 of 3)

: to drink in honor of

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More from Merriam-Webster on toast

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for toast

Nglish: Translation of toast for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of toast for Arabic Speakers

Comments on toast

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