heat

verb
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \
heated; heating; heats

Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become warm or hot water heating in a kettle
2 : to start to spoil from heat

transitive verb

1 : to make warm or hot heat a can of soup heat the oven to 350 degrees
2 : excite were heated by his stirring words

heat

noun

Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a(1) : a condition of being hot : warmth snow melting in the heat of the sun
(2) : a marked or notable degree of hotness The heat was intense.
b : pathological excessive bodily temperature the heat of the fever
c : a hot place or situation get out of the heat
d(1) : a period of heat an unbroken heat
(2) : a single complete operation of making something warm or hot also : the quantity of material so heated
e(1) physics : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) physics : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
f : appearance, condition, or color of something as indicating its temperature when the rod is at the proper welding heat
2a : intensity of feeling or reaction : passion answered with considerable heat
b : the height or stress of an action or condition in the heat of battle
c : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal like an animal in heat specifically : estrus
3 : a single continuous effort: such as
a : a single round of a contest (such as a race) having two or more rounds for each contestant won two heats out of three
b : one of several preliminary contests held to eliminate less competent contenders won the second heat but finished third in the final race
4 : pungency of flavor Add some cayenne pepper for extra heat.
5a slang
(1) : the intensification of law-enforcement activity or investigation waited until the heat was off
(2) : police
b : pressure, coercion turn up the heat on your congressperson
c : abuse, criticism took heat for her mistakes
6 baseball : smoke sense 8 throwing some heat
7 slang : gun sense 1b was packing heat

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Other Words from heat

Verb

heatable \ ˈhē-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce heatable (audio) \ adjective

Noun

heatless \ ˈhēt-​ləs How to pronounce heatless (audio) \ adjective
heatproof \ ˈhēt-​ˌprüf How to pronounce heatproof (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for heat

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

Antonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Noun

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Examples of heat in a Sentence

Verb I heated the vegetables in the microwave. They heat their house with a wood stove. Noun The sun's heat melted the snow. the intense heat of a fire She applied heat to the sore muscles in her leg. a period of high heat and humidity The crops were damaged by drought and extreme heat. Cook the milk over low heat. Remove the pan from the heat.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Plant them, and things cool down; remove them, and things heat up. Clive Thompson, The Atlantic, "The Struggle to Save City Trees," 9 Oct. 2020 In a medium skillet, heat the olive oil and saute the shallots for 2 minutes. Kristen Massad, Dallas News, "3 classic apple recipes to try this fall, from deep dish pie to quiche," 8 Oct. 2020 When ready to serve, heat large Dutch oven on medium-high. Kate Merker, Woman's Day, "Blanched Green Beans," 7 Oct. 2020 And if the campfire is still going, heat some water, pour it into a heatproof water bottle, and snuggle into your bag with it. Deb Acord, Popular Mechanics, "Winter Campting: How to Camp in the Cold Like a Pro," 5 Oct. 2020 Smaller servings heat up more quickly and prevent food waste. Robin Miller, The Arizona Republic, "Here's an easy breakfast recipe for burritos you can make ahead and freeze for later," 4 Oct. 2020 The presidential race in Minnesota will heat up this week amid a series of campaign stops by the candidates and their surrogates. Kevin Diaz, Star Tribune, "Jill Biden will campaign in Minnesota on Saturday, on heels of Trump visit," 30 Sep. 2020 The more humans heat up the planet, the greater the odds of hot, dry conditions conducive to fires. Ray Sanchez, CNN, "Wildfire-weary Californians, 'tired of this being normal,' consider uprooting their lives," 19 Sep. 2020 This podcast is part of the Common Ground Committee's drive to shed light, not heat on public discourse. Eva Botkin-kowacki, The Christian Science Monitor, "US election 2020: A closer look at climate change (audio)," 16 Sep. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Set the saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer. Allison Robicelli, Washington Post, "Make cooking your kids’ curriculum," 13 Oct. 2020 Add salmon fillets to the side with the cooking spray and place back on the grill directly over the high heat. ExpressNews.com, "Recipe: Grilled Cedar Plank Salmon," 12 Oct. 2020 Add sugar and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Torie Cox, Country Living, "Citrus Marmalade," 11 Oct. 2020 Bring 7 cups of water to a boil in a wide pan over medium-high heat, then season with 1 tsp salt. Kate Krader, Bloomberg.com, "Famed Chef’s Take on Cacio e Pepe Pasta Improves a ‘Perfect’ Dish," 9 Oct. 2020 To prepare sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine butter and flour and whisk constantly as butter melts and blends with flour. Star Tribune, "Recipes: No-Can Tater Tot Hot Dish, Sort-of Jan Doerr's Shrimp and Carrot Salad," 9 Oct. 2020 Turn and stir the whole vegetable mess over high heat simmering for not more than 3 minutes. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Free digital cookbook celebrates 19th Amendment centennial and suffragists, with a potluck vibe," 7 Oct. 2020 In a medium, oven-safe pot, melt the butter over medium heat and add the leeks and fennel, cooking them until translucent, about 10 minutes. New York Times, "Cooking Class | Yabu Pushelberg," 7 Oct. 2020 Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Jeanmarie Brownson, chicagotribune.com, "Fall pastas come together easily when you cook the veggies ahead," 7 Oct. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heat.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heat

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for heat

Verb

Middle English heten, going back to Old English hǣtan, going back to Germanic *haitjan- (whence also Middle Dutch hēten "to make warm," Old High German heizen, Old Norse heita "to make hot, brew"), derivative of *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

Noun

Middle English hete, going back to Old English hǣtu, going back to Germanic *haitīn- (whence also Old Frisian hēte "high temperature, heat," Old High German heizi), noun derivative from *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

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Time Traveler for heat

Time Traveler

The first known use of heat was before the 12th century

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Statistics for heat

Last Updated

17 Oct 2020

Cite this Entry

“Heat.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heat. Accessed 28 Oct. 2020.

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More Definitions for heat

heat

verb
How to pronounce heat (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something) to become warm or hot

heat

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

: energy that causes things to become warmer
: hot weather or temperatures
: the level of temperature that is used to cook something

heat

verb
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \
heated; heating

Kids Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make or become warm or hot

heat

noun

Kids Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a condition of being hot : warmth We enjoyed the heat of the fire.
2 : hot weather heat and humidity
3 : a form of energy that causes an object to rise in temperature
4 : strength of feeling or force of action In the heat of anger, I said some cruel things.
5 : a single race in a contest that includes two or more races
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \

Medical Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become warm or hot

transitive verb

: to make warm or hot

heat

noun

Medical Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the state of a body or of matter that is perceived as opposed to cold and is characterized by elevation of temperature : a condition of being hot especially : a marked or notable degree of this state : high temperature
b(1) : a feverish state of the body : pathological excessive bodily temperature (as from inflammation) knew the throbbing heat of an abscess the heat of the fever
(2) : a warm flushed condition of the body (as after exercise) : a sensation produced by or like that produced by contact with or approach to heated matter
c(1) : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
2 : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal specifically : estrus

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