heat

verb
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \
heated; heating; heats

Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become warm or hot water heating in a kettle
2 : to start to spoil from heat

transitive verb

1 : to make warm or hot heat a can of soup heat the oven to 350 degrees
2 : excite were heated by his stirring words

heat

noun

Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a(1) : a condition of being hot : warmth snow melting in the heat of the sun
(2) : a marked or notable degree of hotness The heat was intense.
b : pathological excessive bodily temperature the heat of the fever
c : a hot place or situation get out of the heat
d(1) : a period of heat an unbroken heat
(2) : a single complete operation of making something warm or hot also : the quantity of material so heated
e(1) physics : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) physics : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
f : appearance, condition, or color of something as indicating its temperature when the rod is at the proper welding heat
2a : intensity of feeling or reaction : passion answered with considerable heat
b : the height or stress of an action or condition in the heat of battle
c : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal like an animal in heat specifically : estrus
3 : a single continuous effort: such as
a : a single round of a contest (such as a race) having two or more rounds for each contestant won two heats out of three
b : one of several preliminary contests held to eliminate less competent contenders won the second heat but finished third in the final race
4 : pungency of flavor Add some cayenne pepper for extra heat.

5a slang

(1) : the intensification of law-enforcement activity or investigation waited until the heat was off
(2) : police
b : pressure, coercion turn up the heat on your congressperson
c : abuse, criticism took heat for her mistakes
6 baseball : smoke sense 8 throwing some heat
7 slang : gun sense 1b was packing heat

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Other Words from heat

Verb

heatable \ ˈhē-​tə-​bəl How to pronounce heatable (audio) \ adjective

Noun

heatless \ ˈhēt-​ləs How to pronounce heatless (audio) \ adjective
heatproof \ ˈhēt-​ˌprüf How to pronounce heatproof (audio) \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for heat

Synonyms: Verb

hot (up) [chiefly Southern, southern Midland, & British], toast, warm

Synonyms: Noun

ardency, ardor, emotion, enthusiasm, fervency, fervidness, fervor, fire, intenseness, intensity, passion, passionateness, vehemence, violence, warmth, white heat

Antonyms: Verb

chill, cool, refrigerate

Antonyms: Noun

impassiveness, impassivity, insensibility, insensibleness, insensitiveness, insensitivity

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Examples of heat in a Sentence

Verb

I heated the vegetables in the microwave. They heat their house with a wood stove.

Noun

The sun's heat melted the snow. the intense heat of a fire She applied heat to the sore muscles in her leg. a period of high heat and humidity The crops were damaged by drought and extreme heat. Cook the milk over low heat. Remove the pan from the heat.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

That means more consistent inflation pressures during a race as the tires heat up. Ezra Dyer, Popular Mechanics, "Should You Really Put Nitrogen in Your Car Tires?," 19 Dec. 2018 As part of Cuisinart Chef's Classic Enameled Cast Iron Cookware, this pot can be heated up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit and have a lifetime warrantee. Taylor Mead, House Beautiful, "Amazon Is Selling These Cuisinart Oval Casserole Dishes For Practically Nothing," 30 July 2018 When the county heats up into the danger zone — as has been forecast for the next few days — San Diego County’s Cool Zones are a welcome refuge to take in some refreshing cool air. Laura Groch, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Where to head when it's hotter than heck: A list of county Cool Zones," 5 July 2018 When the weather heats up and school gets out, there is a neverending plethora of things to do and check out around this state. Brian Manzullo, Detroit Free Press, "Michigan's summer gems: 22 activities you must try," 27 June 2018 With these tips, your home should run more efficiently and stay cooler, even when Mother Nature heats things up. For Lg&e Ku, The Courier-Journal, "Check out these no-fuss ways to save energy and money this summer.," 26 June 2018 When the weather heats up in early summer, that area of high pressure tends to drift northward. Weldon B. Johnson, azcentral, "2018 Arizona monsoon prediction: Possibly wetter than normal?," 14 June 2018 And over at UC Berkeley, engineers have concocted a fancy sponge-like material that collects moisture from cool desert air at night and releases it as drinking water when things heat up during the day. Matt Simon, WIRED, "LA Is Doing Water Better Than Your City. Yes, That LA," 12 June 2018 Rotis rely on the steam released when the bread is heated to puff up while parathas are flakier because usually ghee or oil is incorporated into the flour while the dough is prepared. Nik Sharma, San Francisco Chronicle, "A Brown Kitchen: Paneer paratha and essential Indian flatbreads," 8 June 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Living in the Northeast means that from November to April, the heat is blasting, and the air is bone dry. Stephanie Shore Fisher, Country Living, "The Honeywell HCM350W Humidifier Is Single-Handedly Helping Me Survive the Winter," 12 Feb. 2019 This heat is especially dangerous for the elderly, many of whom already face heart and lung problems. Umair Irfan, Vox, "What we learned from the disasters that hammered the US in 2018," 27 Dec. 2018 How much heat is flowing up from the decay of radioactive elements at the planet’s core? Paul Roberts, The Seattle Times, "Mars landing is a nail-biter for Redmond rocket engineers," 26 Nov. 2018 But for $160, Everlane’s extra-puffy option will do the trick thanks to its microfiber thermal insulation and boxy fit with a hidden drawstring waist that's designed to keep in heat. Lindsey Murray, Good Housekeeping, "Everlane's ReNew Puffer With a 38,000 Person Waitlist Is Back in Stock," 29 Oct. 2018 Sucking the heat out of modern electronics is a technical feat all by itself. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Edge on cooling from nanostructure beats physical limit," 11 Sep. 2018 Remove from heat, squeeze the roasted orange wedges into the pan, add the Dijon mustard and the remaining 1 tablespoon olive oil and whisk to combine. Woman's Day, "Roasted Citrus Chicken Salad," 15 Feb. 2019 The judge upset environmentalists, for instance, with rulings against Obama-era regulations of toxic air pollution from power plants and efforts to cut emissions of heat-trapping gases. Ann E. Marimow, chicagotribune.com, "5 things to know about Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh," 9 July 2018 Heat a skillet over a medium heat, coat it with a tablespoon of oil, and add your frittata mixture. Audrey Bruno, SELF, "I'm Declaring 2019 the Year of the Frittata—Here's How I Got Here and How You Can Too," 7 Feb. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heat.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heat

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for heat

Verb

Middle English heten, going back to Old English hǣtan, going back to Germanic *haitjan- (whence also Middle Dutch hēten "to make warm," Old High German heizen, Old Norse heita "to make hot, brew"), derivative of *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

Noun

Middle English hete, going back to Old English hǣtu, going back to Germanic *haitīn- (whence also Old Frisian hēte "high temperature, heat," Old High German heizi), noun derivative from *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

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Statistics for heat

Last Updated

12 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for heat

The first known use of heat was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for heat

heat

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something) to become warm or hot

heat

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

: energy that causes things to become warmer
: hot weather or temperatures
: the level of temperature that is used to cook something

heat

verb
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \
heated; heating

Kids Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make or become warm or hot

heat

noun

Kids Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a condition of being hot : warmth We enjoyed the heat of the fire.
2 : hot weather heat and humidity
3 : a form of energy that causes an object to rise in temperature
4 : strength of feeling or force of action In the heat of anger, I said some cruel things.
5 : a single race in a contest that includes two or more races
\ ˈhēt How to pronounce heat (audio) \

Medical Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become warm or hot

transitive verb

: to make warm or hot

heat

noun

Medical Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the state of a body or of matter that is perceived as opposed to cold and is characterized by elevation of temperature : a condition of being hot especially : a marked or notable degree of this state : high temperature
b(1) : a feverish state of the body : pathological excessive bodily temperature (as from inflammation) knew the throbbing heat of an abscess the heat of the fever
(2) : a warm flushed condition of the body (as after exercise) : a sensation produced by or like that produced by contact with or approach to heated matter
c(1) : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
2 : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal specifically : estrus

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More from Merriam-Webster on heat

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with heat

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heat

Spanish Central: Translation of heat

Nglish: Translation of heat for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of heat for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about heat

Comments on heat

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