heat

verb
\ ˈhēt \
heated; heating; heats

Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1 : to become warm or hot water heating in a kettle
2 : to start to spoil from heat

transitive verb

1 : to make warm or hot heat a can of soup heat the oven to 350 degrees
2 : excite were heated by his stirring words

heat

noun

Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a(1) : a condition of being hot : warmth snow melting in the heat of the sun
(2) : a marked or notable degree of hotness The heat was intense.
b : pathological excessive bodily temperature the heat of the fever
c : a hot place or situation get out of the heat
d(1) : a period of heat an unbroken heat
(2) : a single complete operation of making something warm or hot also : the quantity of material so heated
e(1) physics : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) physics : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
f : appearance, condition, or color of something as indicating its temperature when the rod is at the proper welding heat
2a : intensity of feeling or reaction : passion answered with considerable heat
b : the height or stress of an action or condition in the heat of battle
c : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal like an animal in heat specifically : estrus
3 : a single continuous effort: such as
a : a single round of a contest (such as a race) having two or more rounds for each contestant won two heats out of three
b : one of several preliminary contests held to eliminate less competent contenders won the second heat but finished third in the final race
4 : pungency of flavor Add some cayenne pepper for extra heat.

5a slang

(1) : the intensification of law-enforcement activity or investigation waited until the heat was off
(2) : police
b : pressure, coercion turn up the heat on your congressperson
c : abuse, criticism took heat for her mistakes
6 baseball : smoke sense 8 throwing some heat
7 slang : gun sense 1b was packing heat

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Other Words from heat

Verb

heatable \ ˈhē-​tə-​bəl \ adjective

Noun

heatless \ ˈhēt-​ləs \ adjective
heatproof \ ˈhēt-​ˌprüf \ adjective

Synonyms & Antonyms for heat

Synonyms: Verb

hot (up) [chiefly Southern, southern Midland, & British], toast, warm

Synonyms: Noun

ardency, ardor, emotion, enthusiasm, fervency, fervidness, fervor, fire, intenseness, intensity, passion, passionateness, vehemence, violence, warmth, white heat

Antonyms: Verb

chill, cool, refrigerate

Antonyms: Noun

impassiveness, impassivity, insensibility, insensibleness, insensitiveness, insensitivity

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Examples of heat in a Sentence

Verb

I heated the vegetables in the microwave. They heat their house with a wood stove.

Noun

The sun's heat melted the snow. the intense heat of a fire She applied heat to the sore muscles in her leg. a period of high heat and humidity The crops were damaged by drought and extreme heat. Cook the milk over low heat. Remove the pan from the heat.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The contest to succeed Mr. Bernanke heats up with Ms. Yellen and Mr. Summers emerging as top contenders. David Harrison, WSJ, "Timeline of Significant Fed Events in 2013," 11 Jan. 2019 While vegetables are roasting, heat large skillet on medium. The Good Housekeeping Test Kitchen, Good Housekeeping, "Mustard Glazed Pork Chops," 21 Dec. 2018 Thick and tarry, asphalt needs to be heated up from a solid form before it can be spread out in a thick layer to make a road. Mary Beth Griggs, The Verge, "How Alaska fixed its earthquake-shattered roads in just days," 8 Dec. 2018 In an infrared spa, light waves heat the body rather than the air, which works faster and keeps the room temperature between 110 and 160 degrees. Stefanos Chen, The Seattle Times, "Real estate technology that could have a lasting effect on housing," 20 Nov. 2018 May 15, 2018 is the last day a utility heated household with a shut off notice for its primary source of heat can apply for benefits. Courant Community, "Community News For The South Windsor Edition," 24 Apr. 2018 This allows the ice to absorb more solar energy, thereby heating up and melting faster, which in turn allows the microorganisms to spread further. Umair Irfan, Vox, "Greenland’s ice sheet is melting at its fastest rate in centuries," 8 Dec. 2018 The three episodes that Naomi already appeared in clearly set the stage for their romance, and then things really heated up between the pair—literally. Kelly O'sullivan, Country Living, "'Chicago Fire' Recap: Everything You Missed During the Devastating Fall Finale," 6 Dec. 2018 If growth or inflation heats up unexpectedly, the Fed could decide to go further than planned. Nick Timiraos, WSJ, "Fed Weighs Wait-and-See Approach on Future Rate Increases," 6 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

And some within Nissan resented Mr. Ghosn for letting Mr. Saikawa take all the heat for quality scandals at Nissan plants in Japan that began late last year, even though the problems dated to Mr. Ghosn’s time as CEO. Phred Dvorak, WSJ, "At Troubled Nissan, CEO Described as a ‘Space Alien’ Takes the Wheel," 30 Dec. 2018 Record wildfires killed dozens and leveled entire towns, fueled by extreme heat, years of drought, and dead trees. Julia Belluz, Vox, "7 bad science and health ideas that should die with 2018," 26 Dec. 2018 BedJet heats and cools automatically, making falling asleep and getting up easier. Sara Rodrigues, House Beautiful, "This Bed-Heating Fan Will Replace Your Thermostat, And It's On Sale Right Now," 7 Dec. 2018 In the United States, buildings account for nearly 40 percent of carbon emissions mostly due to the energy required to heat, cool, and illuminate them. Diana Budds, Curbed, "This enormous pulsating sculpture tells you how much energy a building uses," 9 Oct. 2018 Instead of applying fearsome heat and pressure, reverse fuel cells make ammonia by deftly wrangling ions and electrons. Robert F. Service, Science | AAAS, "Ammonia—a renewable fuel made from sun, air, and water—could power the globe without carbon," 12 July 2018 There was no shade, no escape from the heat, for the immigrant mother waiting for hours Wednesday outside a south Texas shelter in this border city to reclaim her 17-year-old daughter. Molly Hennessy-fiske, latimes.com, "What it took to reunite one immigrant family separated under U.S. 'zero tolerance' policy," 12 July 2018 Afternoon highs should cluster near 90 degrees Sunday and, coupled with dew points in the 70s, peak afternoon heat indexes should reach the middle and upper 90s. Tom Skilling, chicagotribune.com, "Warm and muggy through Monday, then comfortably cooler," 14 July 2018 Dew points may dip below 60 degrees, keeping our heat index around the same reading as the air temperature! James Hohmann, Washington Post, "The Daily 202: GOP candidates caught in a bind on Medicaid," 13 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'heat.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of heat

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

History and Etymology for heat

Verb

Middle English heten, going back to Old English hǣtan, going back to Germanic *haitjan- (whence also Middle Dutch hēten "to make warm," Old High German heizen, Old Norse heita "to make hot, brew"), derivative of *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

Noun

Middle English hete, going back to Old English hǣtu, going back to Germanic *haitīn- (whence also Old Frisian hēte "high temperature, heat," Old High German heizi), noun derivative from *haita- "having a high temperature, burning" — more at hot entry 1

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Statistics for heat

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for heat

The first known use of heat was before the 12th century

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More Definitions for heat

heat

verb

English Language Learners Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to cause (something) to become warm or hot

heat

noun

English Language Learners Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

: energy that causes things to become warmer

: hot weather or temperatures

: the level of temperature that is used to cook something

heat

verb
\ ˈhēt \
heated; heating

Kids Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to make or become warm or hot

heat

noun

Kids Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : a condition of being hot : warmth We enjoyed the heat of the fire.
2 : hot weather heat and humidity
3 : a form of energy that causes an object to rise in temperature
4 : strength of feeling or force of action In the heat of anger, I said some cruel things.
5 : a single race in a contest that includes two or more races
\ ˈhēt \

Medical Definition of heat

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to become warm or hot

transitive verb

: to make warm or hot

heat

noun

Medical Definition of heat (Entry 2 of 2)

1a : the state of a body or of matter that is perceived as opposed to cold and is characterized by elevation of temperature : a condition of being hot especially : a marked or notable degree of this state : high temperature
b(1) : a feverish state of the body : pathological excessive bodily temperature (as from inflammation) knew the throbbing heat of an abscess the heat of the fever
(2) : a warm flushed condition of the body (as after exercise) : a sensation produced by or like that produced by contact with or approach to heated matter
c(1) : added energy that causes substances to rise in temperature, fuse, evaporate, expand, or undergo any of various other related changes, that flows to a body by contact with or radiation from bodies at higher temperatures, and that can be produced in a body (as by compression)
(2) : the energy associated with the random motions of the molecules, atoms, or smaller structural units of which matter is composed
2 : sexual excitement especially in a female mammal specifically : estrus

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More from Merriam-Webster on heat

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with heat

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for heat

Spanish Central: Translation of heat

Nglish: Translation of heat for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of heat for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about heat

Comments on heat

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