toast

noun
\ ˈtōst How to pronounce toast (audio) \

Definition of toast

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1a : sliced bread browned on both sides by heat
b : food prepared with toasted bread
2 : an act of proposing or of drinking in honor of a toast
3 slang : one that is finished or done for soon their relationship was toast— Rick Reilly
4 : a rhyming narrative poem existing in oral tradition among Black Americans
5a(1) : a person whose health is drunk
(2) : something in honor of which persons usually drink
b : one that is highly admired she's the toast of society

toast

verb (1)
toasted; toasting; toasts

Definition of toast (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to make (food, such as bread) crisp, hot, and brown by heat
2 : to warm thoroughly

intransitive verb

: to become toasted especially : to warm thoroughly

toast

verb (2)
toasted; toasting; toasts

Definition of toast (Entry 3 of 3)

transitive verb

: to propose or drink to as a toast

Examples of toast in a Sentence

Noun I had toast for breakfast. He made a toast to the bride and groom. Everyone drank a toast to the bride and groom.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The odds-on favorite is Fernando Tatis Jr., and here’s a toast to that. Bruce Jenkins, San Francisco Chronicle, 13 July 2021 Guthrie said during a toast, nodding to their vaccination statuses. Jenna Ryu, USA TODAY, 12 July 2021 But there was something Fire fans — tailgating for the first time since the 2019 season at SeatGeek Stadium in Bridgeview — could offer a toast. Jeremy Mikula, chicagotribune.com, 24 June 2021 Paladin’s celebration is rooted in being able to gather with friends, hoisting a toast, and having fun. Marc Bona, cleveland, 28 May 2021 The sun was just beginning to set as Mr. Zaslav gave a toast. New York Times, 21 May 2021 Check out the recipe below and don't forget to share a toast on social media. Stacey Leasca, Travel + Leisure, 19 May 2021 The true apex of the blooper reel, though, involves Brian Austin Green's priceless reaction when Spelling attempts to give a toast during a scene at a bar. Kristen Baldwin, EW.com, 18 May 2021 With a crisp rosé wine in your hand, elephants swigging from the property's infinity pool join you in a toast. Alexandra Kirkman, Fortune, 16 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Guests will toast the Civic’s Staging the Future capital project. Marc Bona, cleveland, 28 June 2021 Some chefs like to lightly toast the rice with spices before adding the water, this technique helps the rice develop a nutty flavor. Flora Tsapovsky, Southern Living, 12 May 2021 To toast his comeback, and the revival of New York City in general, fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi and actress Sandra Bernhard hosted a cabaret at the Carlyle. Olivia Hosken, Town & Country, 16 June 2021 Meanwhile, in a dry skillet over medium-low heat, toast the almonds or pine nuts, shaking the pan often, for 5 minutes, or until golden. BostonGlobe.com, 15 June 2021 From California cabs to French pinot noirs, dad will toast the good times with each bottle in his subscription. Jennifer Miko, Chron, 1 June 2021 In honor of the huge milestone birthday, each one of Mamoun's locations will toast to the beloved brand on Tuesday, May 11th with all those who stop by to celebrate. Amber Love Bond, Forbes, 6 May 2021 Back at Magic Kingdom, all the characters, including Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, Pluto, and Chip 'n' Dale, will be dressed to the nines to toast the anniversary. Rachel Chang, Travel + Leisure, 23 June 2021 And there was plenty of the bubbly on hand to help partygoers toast the partnership. Lilah Ramzi, Vogue, 6 June 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Claud and Josh Mehling are on their way from New York to help Cottrill settle in and toast the release of Sling, out today. Keaton Bell, Vogue, 16 July 2021 Country music stars, a billionaire, a civil rights icon and the most powerful woman in Congress traveled to this tiny town on Saturday to toast Jimmy and Rosalynn Carter for their 75th wedding anniversary. Washington Post, 10 July 2021 After the Beacon Hill fixture since 1933 reopened with a bang on June 7, pandemic-weary regulars were eager to toast the return of old friends, traditions, and habits. BostonGlobe.com, 3 July 2021 Never mind that the pious hosts were to toast a rough-and-tumble team known for its dirty tricks and abrasive behavior. Mike Klingaman, baltimoresun.com, 30 June 2021 Friends and family will be gathering at backyard barbecues, pool parties, the beach, and more to toast to summer. Sarah Boyd, Forbes, 28 June 2021 Back at Magic Kingdom, all the characters, including Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, Daisy Duck, Pluto, and Chip 'n' Dale, will be dressed to the nines to toast the anniversary. Rachel Chang, Travel + Leisure, 23 June 2021 The music mogul appeared virtually and helped the Weitzes celebrate their run while also teasing his upcoming mega-concert in Central Park in August, an initiative to help toast New York’s pandemic recovery. Chris Gardner, Billboard, 5 July 2021 Lightly toast Specially Selected Brioche Buns Spread the Burman's Dipping Sauce of your choice on the bun. Perri Ormont Blumberg, Southern Living, 1 July 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'toast.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of toast

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 2

Verb (2)

1700, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for toast

Noun

Middle English toste, toost, noun derivative of tosten "to toast entry 2"; (sense 2) noun derivative of toast entry 3

Note: The word toast in the sense "a person whose health is drunk," with the accompanying verb "to propose or drink to (a person) as a toast," first appears in print at the very end of the seventeenth century. The conventional assumption is that the use is metaphorical, "the name of a lady being supposed to flavour a bumper like a spiced toast in the drink," as it is expressed in the Oxford English Dictionary, first edition. This is pure speculation, however, as the origin of the sense remains obscure. Two oft-quoted explanations appear in Richard steele's journal The Tatler, which appeared between April, 1709 and January, 1711. The first is in No. 24 (June 4, 1709), probably written by Joseph addison: "To know what a toast is in the country gives as much perplexity as she herself does in town: and indeed the learned differ very much upon the original of this word, and the acceptation of it among the moderns …But many of the wits of the last age will assert that the word, in its present sense, was known among them in their youth, and had its rise from an accident in the town of Bath, in the reign of King Charles the Second. It happen'd, that on a publick day a celebrated beauty of those times was in the Cross Bath, and one of the croud of her admirers took a glass of the water in which the fair one stood, and drank her health to the company. There was in the place a gay fellow half fuddled who offered to jump in, and swore tho' he liked not the liquor, he would have the toast [alluding to a drink with toast dipped in it]. He was opposed in his resolution; yet this whim gave foundation to the present honour which is done to the lady we mention in our liquors, who has ever since been called a toast." Another allusion to an origin, in No. 31 (June 21, 1709) by Richard Steele, makes no mention of the earlier story: "Then, said he [a gentleman in the country unfamiliar with the word], why do you call live people toasts? I answered, that was a new name found out by the wits, to make a lady have the same effect as burridge [borage, used as a garnish or ingredient in cordials] in a glass, when a man is drinking." As both Addison and Steele were capable of mixing fact with invention, these anecdotes should probably not be taken too seriously.

Verb (1)

Middle English tosten "to darken by heat, crisp and darken bread by heat," borrowed from Anglo-French toster, tostir (also continental Old French), going back to Late Latin tostāre "to roast, grill," frequentative derivative of Latin torrēre, past participle tostus (going back to *tors(e)tos) "to heat so as to dry, scorch, parch, (of food) roast" — more at thirst entry 1

Verb (2)

derivative of toast entry 1 (sense 5)

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Time Traveler for toast

Time Traveler

The first known use of toast was in the 14th century

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Statistics for toast

Last Updated

18 Jul 2021

Cite this Entry

“Toast.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/toast. Accessed 23 Jul. 2021.

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More Definitions for toast

toast

verb
\ ˈtōst How to pronounce toast (audio) \
toasted; toasting

Kids Definition of toast

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : to make (food) crisp, hot, and brown by heat toast bread toast cheese
2 : to warm completely Their bare toes toasted in the heat from the fire.— Laura Ingalls Wilder, Little House on the Prairie

toast

noun

Kids Definition of toast (Entry 2 of 3)

1 : sliced bread made crisp, hot, and brown by heat
2 : an act of drinking in honor of a person
3 : a person in whose honor other people drink
4 : a highly admired person He's the toast of the town.

toast

verb
toasted; toasting

Kids Definition of toast (Entry 3 of 3)

: to drink in honor of

More from Merriam-Webster on toast

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for toast

Nglish: Translation of toast for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of toast for Arabic Speakers

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