throng

noun
\ ˈthrȯŋ How to pronounce throng (audio) \

Definition of throng

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a multitude of assembled persons
b : a large number : host
2a : a crowding together of many persons
b : a pressing increase of activity this throng of business— S. R. Crockett

throng

verb
thronged; thronging\ ˈthrȯŋ-​iŋ How to pronounce throng (audio) \

Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to crowd upon : press a celebrity thronged by fans
2 : to crowd into : pack shoppers thronging the streets

intransitive verb

: to crowd together in great numbers

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Synonyms for throng

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for throng

Noun

crowd, throng, horde, crush, mob mean an assembled multitude. crowd implies a close gathering and pressing together. a crowd gathered throng and horde suggest movement and pushing. a throng of reporters a horde of shoppers crush emphasizes the compactness of the group, the difficulty of individual movement, and the attendant discomfort. a crush of fans mob implies a disorderly crowd with the potential for violence. an angry mob

Examples of throng in a Sentence

Noun grabbed a megaphone and addressed the vast throng Verb Shoppers thronged the mall for the sales. fans thronged the field to celebrate the win
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Soldiers from the Army’s medic training program were among the throng, rising well before first light from their barracks at Fort Sam Houston. Sig Christenson, ExpressNews.com, "As Christmas nears, military trainees leave San Antonio in ‘Exodus’," 22 Dec. 2020 In the video, Rico hangs with a throng of women and a lone man who is more of a mascot than a member of the clique. Carrie Battan, The New Yorker, "The Raw Sounds of Rico Nasty," 7 Dec. 2020 The team reception, held for all competitors — from Fiji’s smattering to the United States' throng — has become a Games tradition. Julie Jag, The Salt Lake Tribune, "Salt Lake City-Utah Olympic committee expects to follow Tokyo in trimming budget," 22 Oct. 2020 As part of that throng, some friends and I had set up a sort of urban hunting camp, gathering around a campfire on the metro’s northern outer ring on the eve of the opener. Star Tribune, "Warmth blankets the firearms deer season opener," 7 Nov. 2020 Punter Wade Lees made an off-color joke and running back Josh Kelley flashed his radiant smile before leading the throng of students packed into Wilson Plaza in an eight clap. Ben Bolch, Los Angeles Times, "Pandemic creates different kind of ‘Beat SC’ week for Bruins," 8 Dec. 2020 China, along with Russia, avoided joining the throng that congratulated Biden last weekend after he and vice presidential running mate Kamala Harris secured enough Electoral College votes to unseat President Donald Trump. Fox News, "China congratulates Biden, but few US policy changes seen," 13 Nov. 2020 Despite the throng of travelers, whose justifications for flying Monday were as varied as their destinations, the airport has been far less busy than usual this year, LAX spokesman Heath Montgomery said. Los Angeles Times, "Airports become a surreal oasis from COVID fears, warnings as determined holiday travelers take flight," 25 Nov. 2020 Their wares: the baseball caps tossed into the cheering throng of traders last week by Big Board officials to commemorate the Dow Jones Industrial Average’s first-ever close above 10000. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, "Dow 30,000, Yellen 2021 (Warnings Apply)," 24 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb In the past, even when gun battles between security forces and militants became pervasive, international tourists continued to throng Kashmir’s ski slopes, houseboats and artisan pashmina and papier-mâché shops. New York Times, "In Kashmir’s Stillness, Hopes Wither and Houseboats Sink," 11 Jan. 2021 Noticeably absent now are the tourists who usually throng there, not for New York, but for them — for Savannah and Hoda and Al — lining the street behind their ground-level studio, straining to make their way into the screen. Sridhar Pappu, New York Times, "Savannah Guthrie Is Feeling Lucky," 14 Nov. 2020 The authorities are warning holidaymakers to practice social distancing, but this week market places continued to throng with shoppers ahead of the festive season. Julia Hollingsworth And Esha Mitra, CNN, "As India prepares to celebrate Diwali, experts warn that coronavirus cases could rise," 13 Nov. 2020 His remarkable study on the German aristocracy and the Nazis, Vom König zum Führer (2003), thronged with aristocratic collaborators but left the Hohenzollern prince on the margins. David Motadel, The New York Review of Books, "Helping Hitler: An Exchange," 24 Mar. 2020 Last weekend, ahead of the lockdown, thousands of people thronged Ikea while restaurants were packed for one last hurrah. Iain Marlow, Bloomberg.com, "Hong Kong’s Edge Over Singapore Shows Early Social Distancing Works," 28 Apr. 2020 All around Lilja along Skanegatan Street in the Sodermalm neighborhood of Stockholm, younger Swedes thronged bars, restaurants, and a crowded park last week, drinking in the sun. Thomas Erdbrinkand Christina Anderson, BostonGlobe.com, "‘Life has to go on’: How Sweden has faced the virus without a lockdown," 28 Apr. 2020 Many more thronged the streets around the stadium, heady in their jubilation and desperate to be a witness to this incredible moment. Olu Alake, Quartz Africa, "Forty years ago, Bob Marley paid his own way to play Zimbabwe’s iconic independence concert," 18 Apr. 2020 Nonetheless, thousands of attendees still thronged an exhibition center for the four-day convention, which opened Thursday. Washington Post, "Geneva auto show, other big events canceled amid virus fears," 28 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'throng.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of throng

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for throng

Noun

Middle English throng, thrang "mass, press," going back to Old English *thrang or gethrang (with ge-, collective prefix), going back to West Germanic *þrang- (whence Middle Dutch gedranc "crowd, press," dranc, drang "pressure," Old High German gidrang "crowd, mass"), noun ablaut derivative from the base of Germanic *þrengan-,*þrenhan- "to press" (whence Old Saxon thringan "to press, urge," Old High German dringan, thringan, Old Norse þryngva "to press, crowd," Gothic þreihan), going back to dialectal Indo-European *trenk- "press," whence also Lithuanian trenkiù, treñkti "to push roughly, fling"

Verb

Middle English thrangen, throngen, probably derivative of throng, thrang throng entry 1, replacing thringen, going back to Old English thringan

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Time Traveler for throng

Time Traveler

The first known use of throng was in the 14th century

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Statistics for throng

Last Updated

17 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Throng.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/throng. Accessed 21 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for throng

throng

noun
How to pronounce throng (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of throng

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large group of people

throng

verb

English Language Learners Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

: to go to (a place) in a large group or in large numbers
: to gather in a crowd or in great numbers

throng

noun
\ ˈthrȯŋ How to pronounce throng (audio) \

Kids Definition of throng

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a large group of people : crowd

throng

verb
thronged; thronging

Kids Definition of throng (Entry 2 of 2)

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Comments on throng

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