tame

adjective
\ ˈtām How to pronounce tame (audio) \
tamer; tamest

Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : reduced from a state of native wildness especially so as to be tractable and useful to humans : domesticated tame animals
2 : made docile and submissive : subdued
3 : lacking spirit, zest, interest, or the capacity to excite : insipid a tame campaign

tame

verb
tamed; taming

Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to reduce from a wild to a domestic state
b : to subject to cultivation
c : to bring under control : harness
2 : to deprive of spirit : humble, subdue the once revolutionary … party, long since tamedThe Times Literary Supplement (London)
3 : to tone down : soften tamed the language in the play

intransitive verb

: to become tame

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Other Words from tame

Adjective

tamely adverb
tameness noun

Verb

tamable or tameable \ ˈtā-​mə-​bəl How to pronounce tame (audio) \ adjective
tamer noun

Synonyms & Antonyms for tame

Synonyms: Adjective

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Verb

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Examples of tame in a Sentence

Adjective The island's birds are quite tame. They ran a pretty tame campaign. Some people were shocked by the movie, but I found the story pretty tame. Members of the audience were too tame to interrupt the speaker. Verb It took a while to tame the horse. the people who tamed the Wild West He struggled to tame his temper. The government needs to do something to tame inflation.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The reindeer, Atkinson says, are tame, but not trained. Bailey Berg, Travel + Leisure, "You Can Hike and Do Yoga With Reindeer at This Magical Alaska Ranch," 9 May 2021 Travis shared his own photo of the trip, those his is (slightly) more tame. Carolyn Twersky, Seventeen, "Kourtney Kardashian and Travis Barker's Relationship Timeline Continues to Heat Up," 30 Apr. 2021 After the 2007-09 recession Washington officials focused on reducing budget deficits, which seemed to hold back growth, and inflation was tame. Paul Kiernan, WSJ, "The Fed’s Next Test Is Breaking the Ice Over Policy Shift," 25 Apr. 2021 For all the attention Democrats have paid to the Postal Service’s struggles, party leadership has implored members to keep their questions tame and not attempt to extract promises from the nominees on their plans for the agency or DeJoy’s future. Washington Post, "Biden’s USPS nominees face confirmation hearing as Democrats consider paths to oust DeJoy," 21 Apr. 2021 Inflation has been tame in recent years, hovering at about 2% annually since the Great Recession in 2008. Aimee Picchi, CBS News, "Procter & Gamble says it'll raise prices in September. Is inflation set to surge?," 20 Apr. 2021 This sleek hot tool from hair styling brand T3 features 1-inch ceramic plates that tame frizz and contribute to a smooth release that the brand claims won’t tug at your hair. Mili Godio, NBC News, "Best April sales 2021: Best deals and what to buy this month," 1 Apr. 2021 The Eternal Jack suggested the Masters specifically and golf in general could tame big hitters by deadening the golf ball. Paul Daugherty, The Enquirer, "Doc's Morning Line: Props to the college hoopsters for their perseverance," 25 Mar. 2021 In the 1990s, after the property and stock market crash in 1989, Japan’s fiscal and monetary policy was tame, resulting in anemic growth. Randy Brown, Forbes, "Inflation Fears Will Settle, But Only If Growth Continues," 11 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb But Paul Offit of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia could also claim to be right with his much more optimistic view that vaccines will mostly tame the pandemic from this point forward. Faye Flam, Star Tribune, "An epidemic of unknowns," 15 Apr. 2021 For a spicier version, substitute the ginger for a slice of jalapeño, or tame it down by swapping in 10 to 15 mint leaves. Grace Dickinson, chicagotribune.com, "Easy frozen mocktails you’ll want to make this summer, from slushies to spritzes," 13 Apr. 2021 Adding ginger or lemon juice can help tame the earthiness. Katy Severson, chicagotribune.com, "How to make beet juice," 17 Apr. 2021 In 2009, the Jane Hotel, another property by the same development team, attracted so many celebrity partyers that local residents formed a neighborhood coalition and hired a publicist to tame the situation. New York Times, "How a Legendary New York Hotel Became a Battleground," 16 Apr. 2021 Historical fiction is often beset with a knowingness, a smug hindsight that the best writing of actual historians, who don’t seek to tame their material into emblematic stories, manages to avoid. Thomas Mallon, The New Yorker, "In Thomas Grattan’s Début Novel, Historical Fiction Gets Personal," 12 Apr. 2021 As white supremacists and armed rioters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, McCarthy was reportedly on a tense phone call with Trump, begging him to forcefully tame his supporters, according to Washington Republican Representative Jaime Herrera Beutler. BostonGlobe.com, "‘An incredibly difficult balancing act:’ Will Kevin McCarthy lead the fractious House Republicans to the majority?," 3 Apr. 2021 But while the insulin cohort seems to tame its targets, the pheromone-makers rile theirs up; both behaviors seem to bring hunter and huntee into close contact. Katherine J. Wu, The Atlantic, "Cone Snails Are Liars and Murderers," 12 Mar. 2021 The compound also blocked the production of immune molecules that cells build using RNA bases, hinting that PTC299 might help tame the immune overreaction seen in severe COVID-19. Robert F. Service, Science | AAAS, "Researchers race to develop antiviral weapons to fight the pandemic coronavirus," 11 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'tame.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of tame

Adjective

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for tame

Adjective

Middle English, from Old English tam; akin to Old High German zam tame, Latin domare to tame, Greek damnanai

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Time Traveler for tame

Time Traveler

The first known use of tame was before the 12th century

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Statistics for tame

Last Updated

14 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Tame.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tame. Accessed 18 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for tame

tame

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: not wild : trained to obey people
: not afraid of people
: not exciting or interesting

tame

verb

English Language Learners Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (an animal) tame
: to make (something) less wild or difficult to control : to bring (something) under control

tame

adjective
\ ˈtām How to pronounce tame (audio) \
tamer; tamest

Kids Definition of tame

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : changed from the wild state so as to become useful and obedient to people : domestic a tame elephant
2 : not afraid of people The chipmunks at the park are very tame.
3 : not interesting : dull a tame movie

Other Words from tame

tamely adverb

tame

verb
tamed; taming

Kids Definition of tame (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or become gentle or obedient They tamed the lion.

Other Words from tame

tamer noun

More from Merriam-Webster on tame

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for tame

Nglish: Translation of tame for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of tame for Arabic Speakers

Comments on tame

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