rein

noun
\ ˈrān How to pronounce rein (audio) \

Definition of rein

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a strap fastened to a bit by which a rider or driver controls an animal usually used in plural
2a : a restraining influence : check kept a tight rein on the proceedings
b : controlling or guiding power usually used in plural the reins of government
3 : opportunity for unhampered activity or use gave full rein to her imagination

rein

verb
reined; reining; reins

Definition of rein (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to control or direct with or as if with reins
2 : to check or stop by or as if by a pull at the reins reined in her horse couldn't rein his impatience

intransitive verb

1 : to stop or slow up one's horse or oneself by or as if by pulling the reins
2 archaic : to submit to the use of reins

Illustration of rein

Illustration of rein

Noun

R rein 1

In the meaning defined above

Synonyms for rein

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of rein in a Sentence

Noun He has people working for him, but he has a tight rein on every part of the process. after the president resigned, the vice president stepped in and took the reins of the company
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Keeping a tight rein on expenses is important for a small business operating with a limited budget. Expert Panel®, Forbes, 12 Apr. 2022 Over the years, these companies have rebuffed suitors, borrowed money from banks and others and relied on their own cash to fuel their drilling, giving them freer rein to search for new wells than those who answer to outside shareholders. Gregory Zuckerman, WSJ, 17 Mar. 2022 While the pass gets you in, America the Beautiful doesn’t give you full rein of the park. Stephanie Vermillion, Outside Online, 23 Feb. 2022 A few weeks before Young lodged his protest, 270 medical experts signed a letter demanding Spotify rein in Rogan, The Guardian reported. Grayson Quay, The Week, 31 Jan. 2022 James was afraid to give his inclinations free rein — or, indeed, any rein at all. Washington Post, 14 Sep. 2021 For the Israeli government, the Palestinian initiatives are aimed at helping rein in West Bank discontent that has boiled over in violence in recent months. Thomas Grove, WSJ, 8 Feb. 2022 Meanwhile, an increase in homes for sale should give buyers more options and further rein in price increases. Jon Gorey, BostonGlobe.com, 19 Dec. 2021 In now-viral photos and video, an agent appears to use his rein and horse to trip a migrant, who falls back into the waters of the Rio Grande. Time, 30 Sep. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb What’s happened in Florida is playing out in other states as the crypto industry mobilizes to move its agenda — or defend against efforts to rein it in. New York Times, 10 Apr. 2022 Spiking infections and measures to rein them in are combining to usher in a second straight grim holiday season in Europe. Fox News, 20 Nov. 2021 Increasingly, industry insiders are rooting for spiking mortgage rates to rein in the unsustainable levels of home price growth. Fortune, 27 Apr. 2022 Several steps should be taken to rein in the spread of Candida auris, Faust said. Kristen Jordan Shamus, USA TODAY, 21 Apr. 2022 Several steps should be taken to rein in the spread of Candida auris, Faust said. Kristen Jordan Shamus, Detroit Free Press, 20 Apr. 2022 In a speech at Stanford University on Thursday, he is expected to add his voice to demands for rules to rein in the flood of lies polluting public discourse. New York Times, 20 Apr. 2022 The Fed ultimately steps too hard on the proverbial monetary brakes to rein in the inflation, stock prices tumble, housing markets seize up, businesses stop investing and hiring, consumers pull back on spending, and the economy falters. Mark Zandi For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, 13 Apr. 2022 The cameras were approved by the Maryland General Assembly in 2021 to rein in reckless driving at high speeds on the dangerously winding roadway. Lilly Price, Baltimore Sun, 12 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'rein.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of rein

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

15th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for rein

Noun

Middle English reine, from Anglo-French resne, reine, from Vulgar Latin *retina, from Latin retinēre to restrain — more at retain

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Time Traveler for rein

Time Traveler

The first known use of rein was in the 13th century

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Dictionary Entries Near rein

Reims

rein

reina

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Statistics for rein

Last Updated

17 May 2022

Cite this Entry

“Rein.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/rein. Accessed 19 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for rein

rein

noun
\ ˈrān How to pronounce rein (audio) \

Kids Definition of rein

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a line or strap that is attached at either end of the bit of a bridle and is used to control an animal usually used in pl.
2 : an influence that slows, limits, or holds back The parents kept their child under a tight rein.
3 : controlling or guiding power the reins of government

rein

verb
reined; reining

Kids Definition of rein (Entry 2 of 2)

: to check, control, or stop by or as if by reins He reined in his horse. Rein in your anger.

More from Merriam-Webster on rein

Nglish: Translation of rein for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of rein for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about rein

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