strife

noun
\ ˈstrīf How to pronounce strife (audio) \

Definition of strife

1a : bitter sometimes violent conflict or dissension political strife
b : an act of contention : fight, struggle
2 : exertion or contention for superiority
3 archaic : earnest endeavor

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Other Words from strife

strifeless \ ˈstrī-​fləs How to pronounce strifeless (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for strife

discord, strife, conflict, contention, dissension, variance mean a state or condition marked by a lack of agreement or harmony. discord implies an intrinsic or essential lack of harmony producing quarreling, factiousness, or antagonism. a political party long racked by discord strife emphasizes a struggle for superiority rather than the incongruity or incompatibility of the persons or things involved. during his brief reign the empire was never free of civil strife conflict usually stresses the action of forces in opposition but in static applications implies an irreconcilability as of duties or desires. the conflict of freedom and responsibility contention applies to strife or competition that shows itself in quarreling, disputing, or controversy. several points of contention about the new zoning law dissension implies strife or discord and stresses a division into factions. religious dissension threatened to split the colony variance implies a clash between persons or things owing to a difference in nature, opinion, or interest. cultural variances that work against a national identity

Examples of strife in a Sentence

in order to avoid family strife, the children spend equal time during the holidays with both of their grandmothers bitter strife between the two political factions

Recent Examples on the Web

The flashbacks have been triggered by Britain’s heated debate over leaving the European Union, which has brought division, strife and fear of foreigners. Danica Kirka, The Seattle Times, "Brexhaustion: Long, grinding Brexit is stressing people out," 12 Apr. 2019 Families with huge grins on their faces that never, ever show even a hint of strife. Ashley Edwards Walker, Good Housekeeping, "How to Navigate the Holidays When There’s an Estrangement in Your Family," 21 Dec. 2018 In the ’70s, the punk movement sprang from political and social strife, and its key messages were individuality and freedom above all else. Emily Farra, Vogue, "The Biggest Street-Style Trends of Fall 2019," 13 Mar. 2019 His criminal history harkens back to a darker time in Boston, when the city was struggling through postindustrial malaise, racial strife and a shrinking population. Jennifer Levitz, WSJ, "Notorious Boston Mobster ‘Whitey’ Bulger Dies in Prison," 31 Oct. 2018 The 1950s and '60s saw racial strife throughout the South, as whites resisted racial integration. Emily Wagster Pettus, Fox News, "1959 racial slaying of Mississippi teen could get fresh look," 21 Aug. 2018 This dynamic has deepened tensions between many native French and second-generation immigrants, adding cultural and ethnic strife to the already volatile environment created by socioeconomic malaise. Pascal-emmanuel Gobry, WSJ, "The Failure of the French Elite," 22 Feb. 2019 Small countries like Myanmar, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, and the Philippines are reporting outbreaks of violence and political strife that local activists blame partly on Facebook. Jessi Hempel, WIRED, "What Happened to Facebook's Grand Plan to Wire the World?," 17 May 2018 If the Capital Gazette shooting is a harbinger of a new era where local media organizations face serious safety threats as well as debilitating financial strife, the consequences could be dire, Dalglish said. Caroline Simon, USA TODAY, "Capital Gazette shooting highlights the dangers facing today's journalists," 3 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'strife.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of strife

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for strife

Middle English strif, from Anglo-French estrif, estri, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle Dutch striden to fight, Old High German strītan to quarrel — more at stride

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Dictionary Entries near strife

stridulent

stridulous

strié

strife

striffen

strift

strig

Statistics for strife

Last Updated

13 May 2019

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Time Traveler for strife

The first known use of strife was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for strife

strife

noun

English Language Learners Definition of strife

formal : very angry or violent disagreement between two or more people or groups

strife

noun
\ ˈstrīf How to pronounce strife (audio) \

Kids Definition of strife

: bitter and sometimes violent disagreement political strife

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More from Merriam-Webster on strife

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with strife

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for strife

Spanish Central: Translation of strife

Nglish: Translation of strife for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of strife for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about strife

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