stack

noun
\ ˈstak How to pronounce stack (audio) \

Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a large usually conical pile (as of hay, straw, or grain in the sheaf) left standing in the field for storage
2a : an orderly pile or heap
b : a large quantity or number
3 : an English unit of measure especially for firewood that is equal to 108 cubic feet
4a : a number of flues embodied in one structure rising above a roof
b : a vertical pipe (as to carry off smoke)
c : the exhaust pipe of an internal combustion engine
5a : a structure of bookshelves for compact storage of books usually used in plural
b plural : a section of a building housing such structures
6 : a pile of poker chips
7a : a memory or a section of memory in a computer for temporary storage in which the last item stored is the first retrieved also : a data structure that simulates a stack a push-down stack
b : a computer memory consisting of arrays of memory elements stacked one on top of another

stack

verb
stacked; stacking; stacks

Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to arrange in a stack : pile
b : to pile in or on stacked the table with books stack the dishwasher
2a : to arrange secretly for cheating stack a deck of cards
b : to arrange or fix so as to make a particular result likely the odds are stacked against us will stack juries to suit themselves— Patrice Horn
3a : to assign (an airplane) by radio to a particular altitude and position within a group circling before landing
b : to put into a waiting line another dozen rigs are stacked up and waiting— P. H. Hutchins, Jr.
4 : compare used with against such a crime is nothing when stacked against a murder— Pete Censky

intransitive verb

: to form a stack

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Other Words from stack

Verb

stacker noun

Examples of stack in a Sentence

Noun

He had arranged the letters in stacks. She took a magazine from near the top of the stack.

Verb

She spent the afternoon splitting and stacking firewood. She stacked the plates in the cupboard. He stacked the books on the table. The other players accused him of stacking the deck.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Accenting the show's dizzying stacks of silver hoop earrings, Palau's key product was Redken's Hardwear 16 Gel for a lacquered, raked-back finish. Lauren Valenti, Vogue, "Alexander McQueen Puts a Dramatic Twist on the Classic Ponytail at Paris Fashion Week," 5 Mar. 2019 Continue accordion-folding until the entire stack is complete. Stephanie Shore Fisher, Good Housekeeping, "How to Make Tissue Paper Flower Lollipops for Valentine's Day," 6 Feb. 2019 Roasted over coals and piled into paper cones, a stack of chestnuts goes for about five euro. Mattie Kahn, Glamour, "A Culture Editor's Impulse Buys: $200 of Potions, Swedish Sweets, and More," 7 Jan. 2019 Network stacks are complicated, and network traffic makes network latency variable. Peter Bright, Ars Technica, "New Spectre attack enables secrets to be leaked over a network," 26 July 2018 Don't hoard weights, use an extra bench as your desk or water bottle holder, and don’t work out right in front of the stack of dumbbells, Maietta says. SELF, "Your Guide to Navigating the Free Weights at the Gym," 12 Jan. 2019 Two-toned blues offer a fun departure from the stack of nearly-identical denim already in your closet. Kelsey Stiegman, Seventeen, "10 Instagram-Worthy Ways to Wear Boyfriend Jeans," 8 Jan. 2019 The stack of recent brutalist coffee-table books is beginning to loom as monolithically as their subject matter. Lauren Ho, Condé Nast Traveler, "Architectural Reboot: The Return of Brutalism," 20 Dec. 2018 The stacks look like small shrines to mountain solitude, carefully balanced at the edge of a precipice. Casey Newton, The Verge, "How Kevin Hart tweeted himself out of a job hosting the Oscars," 8 Dec. 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Jump your feet back so that your body is in a high plank position with your hands shoulder-width apart, shoulders stacked over your wrists, back straight, legs extended, and core and glutes engaged. Jenny Mccoy, SELF, "A Total-Body HIIT Workout You Can Do in Under 15 Minutes From Celebrity Trainer Jeanette Jenkins," 14 Mar. 2019 Note: Be prepared to carry and stack plywood and framing lumber. Roy Berendsohn, Popular Mechanics, "How to Become a Skilled Tradesperson," 13 Mar. 2019 Marjan says all the pieces are designed to be mixed, matched, and stacked. Elizabeth Denton, Allure, "Hairstylist Justine Marjan and Kitsch Launched a Second Round of Hair Accessories, and They’re Everything," 12 Mar. 2019 The idea was that billions could be saved by stacking scores of boxes on a single ship rather than on a number on smaller ships. Costas Paris, WSJ, "A Storm Is Gathering Over Container Shipping," 3 Mar. 2019 Storage: For most dinnerware, stacking is just fine. Elle Decor Editors, ELLE Decor, "Everything You Need to Know About Caring for Tabletop Accessories," 11 Feb. 2019 Activists in Miami-Dade County have been protesting around photos of undelivered ballots stacked inside a mail distribution center. Stavros Agorakis, Vox, "Florida judge sides with Democrats, giving thousands a second chance to fix their ballots," 15 Nov. 2018 Although the notes have obvious markings that aren’t typical of legal tender, the bills are the same size as the real thing and might pass for the real thing at a glance if folded or stacked with other bills. Julia Sclafani, sacbee, "Despite Chinese markings, fake $100 bills cause a scene at El Dorado Hills intersection," 9 July 2018 Its clubhouse features colorful murals and inspirational posters related to writing and social justice, as well as bookshelves stacked with classics and new writing. Christopher Johnston, The Christian Science Monitor, "Cleveland uses literature to empower youth, overcome social divides," 9 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stack.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stack

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stack

Noun

Middle English stak, from Old Norse stakkr; akin to Russian stog stack and probably to Old English staca stake

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Statistics for stack

Last Updated

17 Mar 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for stack

The first known use of stack was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for stack

stack

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a usually neat pile : a group of things that are put one on top of the other
: a large amount of something
: a tall chimney on a factory, ship, etc., for carrying smoke away

stack

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

: to arrange (things) in a stack : to put (things) in a usually neat pile
: to cheat at a card game by arranging (a deck of cards) in a special way
used to describe a situation in which one person, team, etc., is given an advantage over others often in a way that is unfair

stack

noun
\ ˈstak How to pronounce stack (audio) \

Kids Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a neat pile of objects usually one on top of the other
2 : a large number or amount We've got a stack of bills to pay.
3 : a large pile (as of hay) usually shaped like a cone
5 : a structure with shelves for storing books

stack

verb
stacked; stacking

Kids Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

: to arrange in or form a neat pile

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More from Merriam-Webster on stack

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stack

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stack

Spanish Central: Translation of stack

Nglish: Translation of stack for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stack for Arabic Speakers

Comments on stack

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