stack

noun
\ ˈstak How to pronounce stack (audio) \

Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a large usually conical pile (as of hay, straw, or grain in the sheaf) left standing in the field for storage
2a : an orderly pile or heap
b : a large quantity or number
3 : an English unit of measure especially for firewood that is equal to 108 cubic feet
4a : a number of flues embodied in one structure rising above a roof
b : a vertical pipe (as to carry off smoke)
c : the exhaust pipe of an internal combustion engine
5a : a structure of bookshelves for compact storage of books usually used in plural
b plural : a section of a building housing such structures
6 : a pile of poker chips
7a : a memory or a section of memory in a computer for temporary storage in which the last item stored is the first retrieved also : a data structure that simulates a stack a push-down stack
b : a computer memory consisting of arrays of memory elements stacked one on top of another

stack

verb
stacked; stacking; stacks

Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to arrange in a stack : pile
b : to pile in or on stacked the table with books stack the dishwasher
2a : to arrange secretly for cheating stack a deck of cards
b : to arrange or fix so as to make a particular result likely the odds are stacked against us will stack juries to suit themselves— Patrice Horn
3a : to assign (an airplane) by radio to a particular altitude and position within a group circling before landing
b : to put into a waiting line another dozen rigs are stacked up and waiting— P. H. Hutchins, Jr.
4 : compare used with against such a crime is nothing when stacked against a murder— Pete Censky

intransitive verb

: to form a stack

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Other Words from stack

Verb

stacker noun

Examples of stack in a Sentence

Noun

He had arranged the letters in stacks. She took a magazine from near the top of the stack.

Verb

She spent the afternoon splitting and stacking firewood. She stacked the plates in the cupboard. He stacked the books on the table. The other players accused him of stacking the deck.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Betting one’s bottom dollar means wagering the entire stack, and the top dollar, or chip, is the one that sits atop the highest pile on the table. San Diego Union-Tribune, "English lays its cards on the table of our tongue," 27 July 2019 One thing was notably missing, though: stacks of paper. Washington Post, "Apollo 11 astronaut returns to launch pad 50 years later," 19 July 2019 Lucas rests the erotically charged forms atop stacks of plain bricks, asserting sensuous organic sculpture’s return from the wilderness of cold rectilinear geometry that characterizes Minimalist art. Los Angeles Times, "Review: Sarah Lucas show at the Hammer Museum is naked but definitely not afraid," 17 July 2019 One thing was notably missing, though: stacks of paper. Marcia Dunn, Twin Cities, "Apollo 11 astronaut returns to launch pad 50 years later," 16 July 2019 Fall of chimneys, factory stacks, columns, monuments, walls. Rong-gong Lin Ii, latimes.com, "How could Ridgecrest earthquakes kill someone 180 miles away in Nevada?," 10 July 2019 In honor of IHOP’s anniversary Tuesday, July 16, participating restaurants will sell short stacks, or three buttermilk pancakes, for 58 cents from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Kelly Tyko, USA TODAY, "July deals: How and where to get free food – from chicken to ice cream – plus discounts," 1 July 2019 Browse stacks of saucisson sec and soppressata; beef jerky and blood sausage. Kara Baskin, BostonGlobe.com, "All the meat you could eat and much more at the revived Moody’s Delicatessen & Provisions," 27 June 2019 This is that stack: elevated, curated, digital, and delightful. Carrie Goldberg, Harper's BAZAAR, "Introducing: BAZAAR Bride—the Ultimate Membership for the Newly-Engaged," 5 Feb. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Metal filing cabinets were stuffed front-to-back with folders, and those that didn’t fit were stacked high on top and around the sides in the modestly-sized room. Catalina Righter, baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll, "Records room update latest in Westminster Police modernizations," 21 July 2019 The sleeping area has stacked beds bolted to the walls, opening into a dayroom that serves as a bathing and communal eating space. Jason Pohl, ProPublica, "Deadly Delays in Jail Construction Cost Lives and Dollars Across California," 20 July 2019 Doraville, Georgia, fined one homeowner $1,000 for stacking firewood in his backyard, according to a lawsuit that accuses the city of aggressive ticketing practices. Kristine Phillips, USA Today, "A Florida woman was fined $100,000 for a dirty pool and overgrown grass. When do fines become excessive?," 19 July 2019 Burdock root—scored, fried, and neatly stacked to form a small gray log cabin—is smoky and surprising. Jessica Henderson, The New Yorker, "Udon Takes On New Texture at Hanon," 12 July 2019 Camila's stacked a lot of checks in her short time on the stage. Jasmine Gomez, Seventeen, "Camila Cabello's Net Worth Is High Enough For Endless Trips to "Havana"," 1 July 2019 The socks, his shirts --those handkerchiefs, neatly stacked. oregonlive.com, "Don’t worry, Dad, I remember you," 16 June 2019 Take two ice cubes in your freezer, and very quickly — so as to not heat any part of them to their melting point — stack them on top of each another. Brian Resnick, Vox, "The surprising science of why ice is so slippery," 31 Jan. 2019 As a publicity prop, Consumer Reports stacked boxes that purportedly contained the paperwork for the 110,000 signatures to be delivered to Comcast officials. Bob Fernandez, Philly.com, "Consumer Reports' 'What the Fee' campaign targets Comcast for its TV, sports fees," 27 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'stack.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of stack

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

History and Etymology for stack

Noun

Middle English stak, from Old Norse stakkr; akin to Russian stog stack and probably to Old English staca stake

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More Definitions for stack

stack

noun

English Language Learners Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a usually neat pile : a group of things that are put one on top of the other
: a large amount of something
: a tall chimney on a factory, ship, etc., for carrying smoke away

stack

verb

English Language Learners Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

: to arrange (things) in a stack : to put (things) in a usually neat pile
: to cheat at a card game by arranging (a deck of cards) in a special way
used to describe a situation in which one person, team, etc., is given an advantage over others often in a way that is unfair

stack

noun
\ ˈstak How to pronounce stack (audio) \

Kids Definition of stack

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a neat pile of objects usually one on top of the other
2 : a large number or amount We've got a stack of bills to pay.
3 : a large pile (as of hay) usually shaped like a cone
5 : a structure with shelves for storing books

stack

verb
stacked; stacking

Kids Definition of stack (Entry 2 of 2)

: to arrange in or form a neat pile

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More from Merriam-Webster on stack

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with stack

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for stack

Spanish Central: Translation of stack

Nglish: Translation of stack for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of stack for Arabic Speakers

Comments on stack

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