sob

1 of 3

verb

sobbed; sobbing

intransitive verb

1
a
: to catch the breath audibly in a spasmodic contraction of the throat
b
: to cry or weep with convulsive catching of the breath
2
: to make a sound like that of a sob or sobbing

transitive verb

1
: to bring to a specified state by sobbing
sobbed himself to sleep
2
: to utter with sobs
sobbed out her grief

sob

2 of 3

noun (1)

1
: an act of sobbing
2
: a sound like that of a sob
plural SOBs or SOB's
slang, sometimes offensive
: son of a bitch
He's one arrogant/tough/greedy SOB.
… a guy who brought two dozen roses to a first coffee date and told you he felt like the luckiest SOB on the planet in the first five minutes.Today

Examples of sob in a Sentence

Verb He began to sob uncontrollably. She could not stop sobbing. “I hate you,” she sobbed. Noun (2) I hate that miserable SOB.
Recent Examples on the Web
Verb
They were devastated and desperate and sobbing, and at a loss about what to do. Monica Potts, ABC News, 8 May 2024 Memes used to represent disgust include someone throwing a flat screen off a terrace, Homer Simpson’s face melting, various forms of screaming and sobbing and worse. Sean Gregory, TIME, 2 May 2024 Naturally, her exit came with a dose of high drama: fans sobbing, fireworks bursting, and a ragtime-esque outro from a live jazz band. Tomás Mier, Rolling Stone, 20 Apr. 2024 At times, Ackerman sobbed and was desperate to get information about how Tate is doing. Katie Moore, Kansas City Star, 19 Apr. 2024 Advertisement Gutierrez, wearing a prison jumpsuit, sobbed at times during Monday’s hearing. Meg James, Los Angeles Times, 15 Apr. 2024 Moments later, his mother was rushing out the door, sobbing. David D. Kirkpatrick, The New Yorker, 15 Mar. 2024 In her book, Foley describes receiving a phone call 21 months later on Aug. 19, 2014, from a news reporter who was sobbing on the other end. Jonathan Edwards, Washington Post, 5 Mar. 2024 Harris had been sobbing and did not speak much with officers or detectives at the home, documents state. Jose R. Gonzalez, The Arizona Republic, 27 Mar. 2024
Noun
In the courtroom gallery, Buckner’s grandmother collapsed into sobs, while her mother clutched a tissue and nodded her head in agreement. Jakob Rodgers, The Mercury News, 13 May 2024 Some of those sobs came from teenagers, who can’t have seen in recent musicals many serious attempts at capturing the confusions of youth. Jesse Green, New York Times, 11 Apr. 2024 Philpott’s recitation of the allegations drew muffled sobs from the audience in the packed courtroom, most of whom were there in support of the victims and their families. Teri Figueroa, San Diego Union-Tribune, 6 Mar. 2024 But those sobs weren't for nothing: By the end of the After the Final Rose episode, Mesnick had changed his mind. Madeline Boardman, EW.com, 26 Mar. 2024 Most people on flights are absorbed into their own movies, books or podcasts and unlikely to notice if someone sheds a tear or suppresses a sob while huddled up in their own seat. Olivia Morelli, Condé Nast Traveler, 8 Mar. 2024 At several junctures during his emotional retirement speech on Monday, Philadelphia Eagles center Jason Kelce paused to collect his thoughts and fight back sobs. Blair Kerkhoff, Kansas City Star, 4 Mar. 2024 In all, 36 paintings show the sobs and despair of the show’s women — 30 line the two longer gallery walls; six more hang from a red-velvet curtain on the shorter back wall. Virginia Brown, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Prayers and sobs can be heard as a crowd gathers around the body, and one man furiously tries to revive the dead man. Yasmine Salam, NBC News, 24 Jan. 2024

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'sob.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb

Middle English sobben; akin to Middle Low German sabben to drool

Noun (2)

son of a bitch

First Known Use

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense 1a

Noun (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

1918, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of sob was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near sob

Cite this Entry

“Sob.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sob. Accessed 24 May. 2024.

Kids Definition

sob

1 of 2 verb
sobbed; sobbing
1
: to weep especially with short gasping sounds
2
: to bring to a specified state by sobbing
sobbed myself to sleep
3
a
: to make a sound like that of sobbing
the wind sobbed through the trees
b
: to utter with sobs
sobbed out their story

sob

2 of 2 noun
1
: an act of sobbing
2
: a sound of or like that of sobbing

Medical Definition

SOB

abbreviation
short of breath

More from Merriam-Webster on sob

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