skill

noun
\ ˈskil How to pronounce skill (audio) \

Definition of skill

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the ability to use one's knowledge effectively and readily in execution or performance
b : dexterity or coordination especially in the execution of learned physical tasks
2 : a learned power of doing something competently : a developed aptitude or ability language skills
3 obsolete : cause, reason

skill

verb
skilled; skilling; skills

Definition of skill (Entry 2 of 2)

intransitive verb

archaic
: to make a difference : matter, avail

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Other Words from skill

Noun

skill-less or skilless \ ˈskil-​ləs How to pronounce skill (audio) \ adjective
skill-lessness or skillessness noun

Choose the Right Synonym for skill

Noun

art, skill, cunning, artifice, craft mean the faculty of executing well what one has devised. art implies a personal, unanalyzable creative power. the art of choosing the right word skill stresses technical knowledge and proficiency. the skill of a glassblower cunning suggests ingenuity and subtlety in devising, inventing, or executing. a mystery plotted with great cunning artifice suggests technical skill especially in imitating things in nature. believed realism in film could be achieved only by artifice craft may imply expertness in workmanship. the craft of a master goldsmith

Examples of skill in a Sentence

Noun Poker is a game of luck and skill. The work is difficult and requires a lot of skill. Cooking is a useful skill. He has excellent social skills.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Market organizers wear a lot of hats and have skill sets that are a mile wide and an inch thick. Rick Nelson, Star Tribune, 10 June 2021 The Nets show how limited the Heat’s skill sets are. Ira Winderman, sun-sentinel.com, 9 June 2021 Current judges Cowell, Heidi Klum, Sofia Vergara and Howie Mandel recruit viewers' help to crown the most talented, and each season's top pick runs the gamut of skill sets. Heran Mamo, Billboard, 7 June 2021 Historically, veterans have faced hurdles convincing civilian employers to recognize their skill sets, a problem even greater for disabled veterans. Trevor Fraser, orlandosentinel.com, 7 June 2021 The 6'9 forward has an intriguing inside/outside skill-set, but could stand to gain more weight and understand where his advantages are on the court. Morten Jensen, Forbes, 28 May 2021 With Jarwin healthy and Schultz in tow, Dallas has one of the better tight end duos in the NFL, as both have very different skill sets but can produce in a starting role if need be. John Owning, Dallas News, 28 May 2021 Kim is a leading figure in our local theater scene and will bring a range of skill sets and a rich sensibility to our artistic operations. Pam Kragen, San Diego Union-Tribune, 26 May 2021 Organizations like the Special Olympics and Paralympics exist to provide opportunities for people with physical and mental disabilities to participate meaningfully and compete against people with similar skill sets. Chris W. Surprenant, The Conversation, 18 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb On July 29, a youth skills camp, free of charge for boys and girls, will take place at the Keney Woodland Basketball Courts in Keney Park in Hartford. Mike Anthony, courant.com, 31 May 2017 Better options for a ramp-down business would include services that leverage expertise or skills the entrepreneur is already known for. Amy Lindgren, Twin Cities, 13 May 2017 Instruction focuses on what is interesting and meaningful to each child, layering necessary skilling on top, with six classes divided into age groups. Nadine Jolie Courtney, Town & Country, 11 Oct. 2016 Occasionally you are made to feel adrift in narrative Siberia, left to dream about condensation and editing, about the knife skills an oral historian should have in her kit. Dwight Garner, New York Times, 24 May 2016 There are also medical engineers skilled in the use of advanced diagnostic equipment, and hydro-engineers to stave off the flooding. David Hiser, National Geographic, 8 Apr. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'skill.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of skill

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 3

Verb

13th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for skill

Noun

Middle English skil, from Old Norse, distinction, knowledge; probably akin to Old English scylian to separate, sciell shell — more at shell

Verb

Middle English skilen, from Old Norse skilja to separate, divide; akin to Old Norse skil distinction

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Learn More About skill

Time Traveler for skill

Time Traveler

The first known use of skill was in the 13th century

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Statistics for skill

Last Updated

19 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Skill.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/skill. Accessed 23 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for skill

skill

noun

English Language Learners Definition of skill

: the ability to do something that comes from training, experience, or practice

skill

noun
\ ˈskil How to pronounce skill (audio) \

Kids Definition of skill

1 : ability that comes from training or practice The band played with skill.
2 : a developed or acquired ability The skill of diving can be learned.

More from Merriam-Webster on skill

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for skill

Nglish: Translation of skill for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of skill for Arabic Speakers

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