safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2a : a precautionary measure, stipulation, or device
b : a technical contrivance to prevent accident

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding; safeguards

Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide a safeguard for
2 : to make safe : protect

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Synonyms & Antonyms for safeguard

Synonyms: Noun

aegis (also egis), ammunition, armor, buckler, cover, defense, guard, protection, screen, security, shield, wall, ward

Synonyms: Verb

bulwark, cover, defend, fence, fend, forfend, guard, keep, protect, screen, secure, shield, ward

Antonyms: Verb

assail, assault, attack

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Choose the Right Synonym for safeguard

Verb

defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard mean to keep secure from danger or against attack. defend denotes warding off actual or threatened attack. defend the country protect implies the use of something (such as a covering) as a bar to the admission or impact of what may attack or injure. a hard hat to protect your head shield suggests protective intervention in imminent danger or actual attack. shielded her eyes from the sun with her hand guard implies protecting with vigilance and force against expected danger. White House entrances are well guarded safeguard implies taking precautionary protective measures against merely possible danger. our civil liberties must be safeguarded

Examples of safeguard in a Sentence

Noun

The new law has safeguards to protect the rights of citizens. There are many safeguards built into the system to prevent fraud.

Verb

laws that safeguard the rights of citizens You need to safeguard your computer against viruses. There are steps you can take to safeguard against identity theft.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

But rules introduced as a safeguard have become a costly trap for ordinary people, The New York Times found. Grace Ashford, New York Times, "The Law Was Aimed at Deadly Machinery. It Hit Her Washer.," 9 Sep. 2019 As a safeguard against errors, Levy and his deputy were required each month to review a random sample of 10 percent of each other's cases, a routine practice among pathologists. Anchorage Daily News, "How Veterans Affairs failed to stop a pathologist who misdiagnosed 3,000 cases," 30 Aug. 2019 As a safeguard, New Jersey’s 1,900 paramedics will need to obtain permission from the emergency physician overseeing their unit before administering buprenorphine when responding to an overdose call. STAT, "In national first, N.J. program will let paramedics administer buprenorphine," 26 June 2019 Then, in March, he was indicted by a state grand jury in New York for mortgage fraud — a case that was viewed by some analysts as a safeguard in case Trump sought to pardon him for the federal crimes. Matt Zapotosky, Washington Post, "Paul Manafort moved to Manhattan detention center that formerly held ‘El Chapo’," 19 June 2019 Then, in March, he was indicted by a state grand jury in New York for mortgage fraud – a case that was viewed by some analysts as a safeguard in case Trump sought to pardon him for the federal crimes. The Washington Post, The Mercury News, "Manafort moved to facility that used to hold El Chapo," 18 June 2019 Apple engineers added the requirement to act as a secondary safeguard. Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "Malware has no trouble hiding and bypassing macOS user warnings," 14 Aug. 2018 Do the Cavaliers need to keep that selection, as a safeguard over James’ exit? Bruce Jenkins, San Francisco Chronicle, "Warriors stay above fray as tensions rise among Rockets, Clippers, Cavaliers," 16 Jan. 2018 That means that our bodies expect to only get fed every so often, and hold onto extra fat as a safeguard against periods of scarcity. Sophie Weiner, Popular Mechanics, "Should You Try Intermittent Fasting to Lose Weight?," 11 Nov. 2017

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

The policy, which attempts to balance safeguarding the sport with player privacy interests, also extensively details how testing is conducted. Michael Mccann, SI.com, "Examining Wilson Chandler's Suspension for PEDs and Infrequency of Steroids in the NBA," 29 Aug. 2019 The allegations against Yaselli serve as a reminder that people need to hire a reputable agent and talk to her about safeguarding their possessions. Martha Ross, The Mercury News, "Usher and Adam Lambert learn the hard way: Thieves love open houses," 23 Aug. 2019 The contrast between Bolsonaro's claims and what the science says has researchers worried over how to safeguard one of the world's most important resources. Anchorage Daily News, "The Amazon is burning. Brazil’s president accused critics of setting fires to make him look bad.," 22 Aug. 2019 In July 2019, Bloomberg News revealed that the company had deployed software on its own platform to look out for posts that portrayed Facebook itself in potentially misleading ways, reducing their visibility to safeguard the company’s reputation. Jennifer Grygiel, The Conversation, "Facebook algorithm changes suppressed journalism and meddled with democracy," 24 July 2019 As antler hunters flood the hills on foot, horseback, and ATVs, wildlife officials have struggled to enforce regulations meant to safeguard western big game herds. Mike Koshmrl, National Geographic, "What it takes to catch antler thieves," 19 July 2019 One way to safeguard the City would be for Britain to become a rule-taker, hewing to European financial regulation. The Economist, "London’s reign as the world’s capital of capital is at risk," 29 June 2019 Consequently, our law builds in due-process presumptions and protections to safeguard Americans. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "The Lessons of the Mueller Probe," 12 June 2019 The refuge was established in 1945 as a way to safeguard the wildlife of the island. Visit Florida, Discover Magazine, "THE BEACHES OF FORT MYERS & SANIBEL: Reconnect with nature," 11 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'safeguard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of safeguard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for safeguard

Noun

Middle English saufgarde, from Anglo-French, from sauf safe + garde guard

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Statistics for safeguard

Last Updated

15 Sep 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for safeguard

The first known use of safeguard was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for safeguard

safeguard

noun

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : something that provides protection against possible loss, damage, etc.

safeguard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to make (someone or something) safe or secure

safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Kids Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that protects and gives safety Drink water as a safeguard against dehydration.

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding

Kids Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or keep safe or secure Refrigerating the food will safeguard it against spoilage.

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Comments on safeguard

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