safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2a : a precautionary measure, stipulation, or device
b : a technical contrivance to prevent accident

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding; safeguards

Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide a safeguard for
2 : to make safe : protect

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Synonyms & Antonyms for safeguard

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for safeguard

Verb

defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard mean to keep secure from danger or against attack. defend denotes warding off actual or threatened attack. defend the country protect implies the use of something (such as a covering) as a bar to the admission or impact of what may attack or injure. a hard hat to protect your head shield suggests protective intervention in imminent danger or actual attack. shielded her eyes from the sun with her hand guard implies protecting with vigilance and force against expected danger. White House entrances are well guarded safeguard implies taking precautionary protective measures against merely possible danger. our civil liberties must be safeguarded

Examples of safeguard in a Sentence

Noun The new law has safeguards to protect the rights of citizens. There are many safeguards built into the system to prevent fraud. Verb laws that safeguard the rights of citizens You need to safeguard your computer against viruses. There are steps you can take to safeguard against identity theft.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun However, law enforcement groups — including police chiefs, sheriffs and prosecutors — have largely opposed the move and consider the state’s existing permit system an important safeguard for knowing who should or shouldn’t be carrying a gun. BostonGlobe.com, "Background checks no longer required for Tennessee gun owners," 8 Apr. 2021 For her part, Ghilarducci sees the policy as a safeguard against future income shocks. Irina Ivanova, CBS News, "401(k) plans favor rich people. Here's how to change that.," 25 Mar. 2021 No safeguard could shield her from a string of injuries that might have led some players to quit. Greg Riddle, Dallas News, "The Dallas area’s most dominant strikeout pitcher is back from a second torn ACL — and it’s like she hasn’t missed a beat," 18 Mar. 2021 The aluminum safeguard ended five months of nightly dread. Nora Mishanec, San Francisco Chronicle, "Catalytic converter thefts are surging across the Bay Area. The thieves rarely get caught," 25 Feb. 2021 Without that safeguard, only one county would be red this week: Athens County. Jackie Borchardt, The Enquirer, "COVID-19 cases are going down in Ohio, so why is the county heat map still red?," 19 Feb. 2021 According to tech guru George Gilder, blockchain encryption is even going to be the safeguard of the future digital economy, promising user flexibility as well as protecting privacy and security. Arthur Herman, Forbes, "The Bitcoin Boom And The Quantum Threat," 3 Mar. 2021 Even before the storm dropped six inches of snow as far south as San Antonio, generators in Texas were required to submit safeguard plans for cold weather. CBS News, "Historic blackouts push Texas to consider something new: Regulation," 25 Feb. 2021 Even before the storm dropped six inches of snow as far south as San Antonio, generators in Texas were required to submit safeguard plans for cold weather. Paul J. Weber, Chron, "Blackouts bring up 'a four-letter word' in Texas: regulation," 24 Feb. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Outlining its proposals last December, the government said its aim was to safeguard key assets while providing a transparent system for business. Alex Morales, Bloomberg.com, "U.K. Plans New Law to Undo Foreign Deals on Security Grounds," 13 Oct. 2020 Part of the problem was that closing down the slave trade was never the main priority of US officials, which was to safeguard the legal commerce of American citizens. James Oakes, The New York Review of Books, "Why Did the Slave Trade Survive So Long?," 23 Mar. 2021 Safety measures will be put into effect in order to safeguard the health of staff, volunteers, judges and visitors. Mike Desimone And Jeff Jenssen, Forbes, "Wine Competition Concours Mondial De Bruxelles Changes Venues," 25 Feb. 2021 Metro Health said exact ages aren’t released in order to safeguard patients’ privacy. Peggy O’hare, San Antonio Express-News, "San Antonio mayor makes urgent bid to FEMA for mass vaccination site," 12 Feb. 2021 Walton wants to safeguard the dark night sky and rich habitats of the cardon forests. Jason H. Harper, Robb Report, "This Mountain-Biking Mecca in Mexico Offers an Isolated Escape Into Nature," 14 Mar. 2021 Shifting security left important to safeguard the agility of modern app development and deployment processes. David Balaban, Forbes, "Beginner's Guide To Container Security," 10 Mar. 2021 Kroger failed to properly safeguard the personal information of some of its employees and customers, according to a federal lawsuit, which led to a data breach that Kroger says impacted approximately 2% of customers. Kevin Grasha, The Enquirer, "Lawsuit: Kroger didn't safeguard employee and customer info, leading to data breach," 9 Mar. 2021 Many states failed to adequately safeguard their systems, and a review by The Associated Press finds that some won’t even publicly acknowledge the extent of the problem. Chronicle Staff, San Francisco Chronicle, "Coronavirus updates from the Bay Area: Feb. 25-Mar. 3, 2021," 3 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'safeguard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of safeguard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for safeguard

Noun

Middle English saufgarde, from Anglo-French, from sauf safe + garde guard

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Time Traveler for safeguard

Time Traveler

The first known use of safeguard was in the 15th century

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Statistics for safeguard

Last Updated

14 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Safeguard.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/safeguard. Accessed 20 Apr. 2021.

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More Definitions for safeguard

safeguard

noun

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : something that provides protection against possible loss, damage, etc.

safeguard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to make (someone or something) safe or secure

safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Kids Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that protects and gives safety Drink water as a safeguard against dehydration.

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding

Kids Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or keep safe or secure Refrigerating the food will safeguard it against spoilage.

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