safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2a : a precautionary measure, stipulation, or device
b : a technical contrivance to prevent accident

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding; safeguards

Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide a safeguard for
2 : to make safe : protect

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Synonyms & Antonyms for safeguard

Synonyms: Noun

aegis (also egis), ammunition, armor, buckler, cover, defense, guard, protection, screen, security, shield, wall, ward

Synonyms: Verb

bulwark, cover, defend, fence, fend, forfend, guard, keep, protect, screen, secure, shield, ward

Antonyms: Verb

assail, assault, attack

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Choose the Right Synonym for safeguard

Verb

defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard mean to keep secure from danger or against attack. defend denotes warding off actual or threatened attack. defend the country protect implies the use of something (such as a covering) as a bar to the admission or impact of what may attack or injure. a hard hat to protect your head shield suggests protective intervention in imminent danger or actual attack. shielded her eyes from the sun with her hand guard implies protecting with vigilance and force against expected danger. White House entrances are well guarded safeguard implies taking precautionary protective measures against merely possible danger. our civil liberties must be safeguarded

Examples of safeguard in a Sentence

Noun

The new law has safeguards to protect the rights of citizens. There are many safeguards built into the system to prevent fraud.

Verb

laws that safeguard the rights of citizens You need to safeguard your computer against viruses. There are steps you can take to safeguard against identity theft.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Agriculture Purpose: Promotes Arizona farming, ranching and agribusiness; protects people, plants, animals and the environment; safeguards commerce and encourages consumer awareness. Kyra Haas, azcentral, "Who runs the state? Here are Arizona's top agency heads (and their salaries)," 16 July 2019 But dissatisfaction with the prior result is not a justification for dispensing with the Constitution’s safeguards. Andrew C. Mccarthy, National Review, "Acosta’s Sweetheart Deal Likely to Foreclose Epstein’s SDNY Prosecution," 13 July 2019 These safeguards would ensure the dying patient chooses medical aid in dying voluntarily to avoid an agonizing death. BostonGlobe.com, "Should Mass. pass legislation to allow physician-assisted suicide?," 11 July 2019 Yet states are enacting even more supposed safeguards. Paula Span, New York Times, "Aid in Dying Soon Will be Available to More Americans. Few Will Choose It.," 8 July 2019 The safeguards included preventing Guarín from playing any role in the bid evaluation process. Time, "World Bank Arm Implicated in Latin American Graft Scandal," 2 July 2019 Otherwise, the company says, the new location-sharing app's safeguards will function much like the old one. Andy Greenberg, WIRED, "The Simple Way Apple and Google Let Domestic Abusers Stalk Victims," 2 July 2019 The Massachusetts attorney general has petitioned the NRC to be allowed to intervene to seek some financial safeguards from the selling utility or Holtec. Susan Schmidt, ProPublica, "Meet the Congressman Defending Questionable Tax Breaks for a Company Connected to His Rich Brother," 2 July 2019 Another key safeguard is to never run a stand-alone version of Flash (the one built into Chrome is generally OK). Dan Goodin, Ars Technica, "In-the-wild Mac malware kept busy in June—here’s a rundown," 29 June 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

And in the basement, the corridor where Jack Ruby made his fateful intervention is being safeguarded for future restoration efforts. Dan Singer, Dallas News, "Dallas' old city hall has been transformed inside for UNT Dallas' law school," 27 June 2019 Initially, companies chafed against the data standard, These companies have also argued that intensive government data collection efforts could harm users, because governments may not be able to safeguard the information. Aarian Marshall, WIRED, "These Cities Will Track Scooters to Get a Handle on Regulation," 25 June 2019 Argument 2: The integrity of REDD projects is safeguarded by watchdogs who accredit them. Lisa Song, ProPublica, "These 4 Arguments Can’t Overcome the Facts About Carbon Offsets for Forest Preservation," 31 May 2019 Robert Warden, 76, a former Washington lawyer whose specialties included protection and safeguarding the retirement savings of state and local government workers, died March 15 at a senior health center in Cedar Park, Tex. Washington Post, "The story must be told.," 18 May 2018 The District Court in the nation’s capital, and the U.S. Supreme Court on appeal, which held that the U.S. was safeguarded against such suits. Arica L. Coleman, Time, "The House Hearing on Slavery Reparations Is Part of a Long History. Here's What to Know on the Idea's Tireless Early Advocates," 18 June 2019 How then to safeguard your child’s best chance of acquiring language and enabling communication? Gavin Francis, The New York Review of Books, "Gavin Francis," 23 May 2019 Hundreds of lawmakers led by senior members of the House and Senate foreign policy committees have written to President Trump calling for a new U.S. strategy in Syria to counter Russia and Iran, deter terrorists and safeguard Israel. Courtney Mcbride, WSJ, "Lawmakers Call on Trump for a New U.S. Policy in Syria," 20 May 2019 The idea is to ensure that these heritage sites are safeguarded for generations to come. Julissa Treviño, Smithsonian, "Oaxaca’s Pre-Hispanic Monte Albán Ruins to Be Restored," 11 May 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'safeguard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of safeguard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for safeguard

Noun

Middle English saufgarde, from Anglo-French, from sauf safe + garde guard

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Statistics for safeguard

Last Updated

21 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for safeguard

The first known use of safeguard was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for safeguard

safeguard

noun

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : something that provides protection against possible loss, damage, etc.

safeguard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to make (someone or something) safe or secure

safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Kids Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that protects and gives safety Drink water as a safeguard against dehydration.

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding

Kids Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or keep safe or secure Refrigerating the food will safeguard it against spoilage.

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