safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ˈsāf-ˌgärd \

Definition of safeguard 

(Entry 1 of 2)

2a : a precautionary measure, stipulation, or device

b : a technical contrivance to prevent accident

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding; safeguards

Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide a safeguard for

2 : to make safe : protect

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Synonyms & Antonyms for safeguard

Synonyms: Noun

aegis (also egis), ammunition, armor, buckler, cover, defense, guard, protection, screen, security, shield, wall, ward

Synonyms: Verb

bulwark, cover, defend, fence, fend, forfend, guard, keep, protect, screen, secure, shield, ward

Antonyms: Verb

assail, assault, attack

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Choose the Right Synonym for safeguard

Verb

defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard mean to keep secure from danger or against attack. defend denotes warding off actual or threatened attack. defend the country protect implies the use of something (such as a covering) as a bar to the admission or impact of what may attack or injure. a hard hat to protect your head shield suggests protective intervention in imminent danger or actual attack. shielded her eyes from the sun with her hand guard implies protecting with vigilance and force against expected danger. White House entrances are well guarded safeguard implies taking precautionary protective measures against merely possible danger. our civil liberties must be safeguarded

Examples of safeguard in a Sentence

Noun

The new law has safeguards to protect the rights of citizens. There are many safeguards built into the system to prevent fraud.

Verb

laws that safeguard the rights of citizens You need to safeguard your computer against viruses. There are steps you can take to safeguard against identity theft.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Song and one of her cofounders have already tested some of their ideas by helping install new privacy safeguards at Uber, the ride-hailing unicorn whose troubled past includes security incidents. Tom Simonite, WIRED, "How a Startup Is Using the Blockchain to Protect Your Privacy," 11 July 2018 Southwest passengers whose flight engine blew up in April are now suing the company, alleging the airline failed to take proper safeguards to prevent the blowout that killed one woman and forced an emergency landing in Philadelphia. Tauhid Chappell, Philly.com, "Some children separated at border are in Pa., police killings strain entire black communities June 22 | Morning Newsletter," 22 June 2018 For one, the Kim regime considers its nuclear weapons as its best safeguard against foreign invasion. Alex Ward, Vox, "The past 72 hours in North Korea news, explained," 30 Apr. 2018 This is a helpful safeguard in case something goes awry. Brian X. Chen, New York Times, "Booking With Airbnb? Here’s Your Survival Guide," 6 June 2018 Some opponents of the bill argue that the legislation won't change much but could have a detrimental effect on how the FDA safeguards public health. Allie Malloy, CNN, "Trump signs 'Right to Try Act' aimed at helping terminally ill patients seek drug treatments," 30 May 2018 The safeguards ultimately will have to come from the schools themselves. Bryce Miller, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Next step for California in sports betting debate: Cash in," 14 May 2018 The hurdle of background check paperwork may dissuade some people from applying to help, but most coaches appreciate the safeguard, Glendale's Larson said. Alexis Egeland, azcentral, "Are your child's coaches background checked? Not always," 10 May 2018 But perhaps the most effective safeguard is the example Trump has set for his successors. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "The Mistake That May Haunt Trump Forever," 9 May 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

What’s not clear today is whether swallowing a fish oil pill or some other type of omega-3 supplement can improve cognitive function or safeguard brain health. Markham Heid, Time, "Are Omega-3s Good for Your Brain?," 20 June 2018 For expert advice on building, improving or safeguarding your home, visit Intelligent Construction. The Courier-Journal, "Should you buy, remodel or build a home?," 29 Apr. 2018 The efforts to secure it, safeguard its shipment, stop enemies from getting or keeping hold of it, and monopolise it if possible, loomed large in 20th-century history (see chart). The Economist, "Clean power is shaking up the global geopolitics of energy," 15 Mar. 2018 President Xi says the central bank will play a stronger role in defending against risks and safeguard the financial system. Bloomberg.com, "How China Is Getting Serious About Financial Risk," 12 Feb. 2018 Rather their power lies in the character of judges in interpreting the Constitution and past court rulings to safeguard both social order and individual liberty. The Christian Science Monitor, "A big question for Trump’s Supreme Court nominee," 10 July 2018 Mayor Daniel Drew said that city hall systems have not been affected, but that the technology staff has been monitoring networks to safeguard information. Shawn R. Beals, Courant Community, "Middletown Schools Hit With Ransomware Attack," 29 June 2018 For years, Chinese government hackers have siphoned information on the U.S. military, underscoring the challenge the Pentagon faces in safeguarding details of its technological advances. Washington Post, "China hacked a Navy contractor and secured a trove of highly sensitive data on submarine warfare," 8 June 2018 For years, Chinese government hackers have siphoned information on the U.S. military, underscoring the challenge the Pentagon faces in safeguarding details of its technological advances. Mark Dent, Anchorage Daily News, "China hacked Navy contractor, secured trove of sensitive data on submarine warfare," 8 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'safeguard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of safeguard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for safeguard

Noun

Middle English saufgarde, from Anglo-French, from sauf safe + garde guard

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Learn More about safeguard

Statistics for safeguard

Last Updated

10 Nov 2018

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for safeguard

The first known use of safeguard was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for safeguard

safeguard

noun

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that provides protection against possible loss, damage, etc.

safeguard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make (someone or something) safe or secure

safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ˈsāf-ˌgärd \

Kids Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that protects and gives safety Drink water as a safeguard against dehydration.

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding

Kids Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or keep safe or secure Refrigerating the food will safeguard it against spoilage.

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Comments on safeguard

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something that serves to warn or remind

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