safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

2a : a precautionary measure, stipulation, or device
b : a technical contrivance to prevent accident

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding; safeguards

Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to provide a safeguard for
2 : to make safe : protect

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Synonyms & Antonyms for safeguard

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

Antonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for safeguard

Verb

defend, protect, shield, guard, safeguard mean to keep secure from danger or against attack. defend denotes warding off actual or threatened attack. defend the country protect implies the use of something (such as a covering) as a bar to the admission or impact of what may attack or injure. a hard hat to protect your head shield suggests protective intervention in imminent danger or actual attack. shielded her eyes from the sun with her hand guard implies protecting with vigilance and force against expected danger. White House entrances are well guarded safeguard implies taking precautionary protective measures against merely possible danger. our civil liberties must be safeguarded

Examples of safeguard in a Sentence

Noun The new law has safeguards to protect the rights of citizens. There are many safeguards built into the system to prevent fraud. Verb laws that safeguard the rights of citizens You need to safeguard your computer against viruses. There are steps you can take to safeguard against identity theft.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Walz on Wednesday permitted restaurants and bars to reopen June 1 for outdoor dining with social distancing and other safeguards, while salons can resume cutting hair at partial capacity. USA TODAY, "Casinos, churches, contact tracing: News from around our 50 states," 22 May 2020 During the same period, at least 166 young migrants were allowed into the United States and afforded the safeguards that were once customary. Caitlin Dickerson, New York Times, "More Than 900 Children Have Been Expelled Under a Pandemic Border Policy," 20 May 2020 As a result of the state Supreme Court's decision in that lawsuit, Evers' administration drafted new emergency rules to reinstate the stay-at-home safeguards. Gina Barton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Gov. Tony Evers plans grants for businesses affected by COVID-19 as WI continues reopening," 18 May 2020 The College Board is introducing new safeguards for high school students to submit at-home Advanced Placement exams this week, following widespread reports of technical problems that impacted students in the Bay Area and nationwide. Chronicle Staff, SFChronicle.com, "Coronavirus news from the Bay Area: May 17," 18 May 2020 In fact, Google recorded a 200% increase in search for sneeze guards as people seek out additional safeguards. Braelyn Wood, Health.com, "Sneeze Guards Are Trending Right Now—Here’s Where to Buy Your Own," 13 May 2020 Now, as worker safeguards have been vetted and the daily case numbers in many parts of the country appear to have peaked, production is resuming. Colin Beresford, Car and Driver, "Across U.S., Automakers' Factories Are Returning to Production," 12 May 2020 Lawsuit protection need not completely abolish lawsuits or legal safeguards. Dan Mclaughlin, National Review, "Reopening the Economy Will Require Lawsuit Protection," 22 Apr. 2020 However, such data exists and can be integrated into a reporting system that would include appropriate privacy safeguards. Alain B. Labrique For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, "It's foolish to worry about privacy when data can help fight coronavirus," 21 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Out of maybe two dozen people waiting, just two or three wore masks as recommended to safeguard others from COVID-19, the infectious disease caused by the new coronavirus. Zaz Hollander, Anchorage Daily News, "State officials recommend masking up, but for some Alaskans, it’s not happening," 13 May 2020 Global car manufacturers have shifted to rigid cash control in a bid to safeguard liquidity during an unprecedented slump in global demand. Oliver Sachgau, Bloomberg.com, "BMW’s $1.8 Billion Dividend Draws Scrutiny With Workers in Limbo," 13 May 2020 In response, lawmakers and activists began pushing for measures to safeguard the November elections from the coronavirus. Eric Lach, The New Yorker, "To Save Election Day, Start by Getting Rid of Election Night?," 8 May 2020 Spahr took unusual steps to safeguard the confidentiality of Donald Trump’s returns. Peter Elkind, ProPublica, "Meet the Shadowy Accountants Who Do Trump’s Taxes and Help Him Seem Richer Than He Is," 8 May 2020 Thacker died 11 days after his captain was fired for pressing the Navy for greater action to safeguard his crew from the virus. Fox News, "USS Theodore Roosevelt sailor who died from coronavirus-related complications identified," 17 Apr. 2020 My administration will take all necessary steps to safeguard our citizens from this threat. Dan Mclaughlin, National Review, "Was Donald Trump Distracted from the Coronavirus Threat by Impeachment?," 31 Mar. 2020 Engineers and scientists are working to find a way to safeguard astronauts during future missions to Mars. Jennifer Leman, Popular Mechanics, "Mars Sure Is Quakin'," 25 Feb. 2020 The public is recommended to get two doses of the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine to safeguard from contracting mumps, the news release stated. Chase Hunter, azcentral, "Public health officials warn of community-wide mumps outbreak in Maricopa County," 19 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'safeguard.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of safeguard

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1501, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for safeguard

Noun

Middle English saufgarde, from Anglo-French, from sauf safe + garde guard

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Time Traveler for safeguard

Time Traveler

The first known use of safeguard was in the 15th century

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Statistics for safeguard

Last Updated

25 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Safeguard.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/safeguard. Accessed 29 May. 2020.

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More Definitions for safeguard

safeguard

noun
How to pronounce safeguard (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

formal : something that provides protection against possible loss, damage, etc.

safeguard

verb

English Language Learners Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

formal : to make (someone or something) safe or secure

safeguard

noun
safe·​guard | \ ˈsāf-ˌgärd How to pronounce safeguard (audio) \

Kids Definition of safeguard

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: something that protects and gives safety Drink water as a safeguard against dehydration.

safeguard

verb
safeguarded; safeguarding

Kids Definition of safeguard (Entry 2 of 2)

: to make or keep safe or secure Refrigerating the food will safeguard it against spoilage.

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Comments on safeguard

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