regenerate

adjective
re·gen·er·ate | \ ri-ˈje-nə-rət , -ˈjen-rət \

Definition of regenerate 

(Entry 1 of 3)

1 : formed or created again

2 : spiritually reborn or converted

3 : restored to a better, higher, or more worthy state

regenerate

verb
re·gen·er·ate | \ ri-ˈje-nə-ˌrāt \
regenerated; regenerating; regenerates

Definition of regenerate (Entry 2 of 3)

intransitive verb

1 : to become formed again

2 : to become regenerate : reform

3 : to undergo regeneration

transitive verb

1a : to subject to spiritual regeneration

b : to change radically and for the better

2a : to generate or produce anew especially : to replace (a body part) by a new growth of tissue

b : to produce again chemically sometimes in a physically changed form

3 : to restore to original strength or properties

regenerate

noun
re·gen·er·ate | \ ri-ˈje-nə-rət , -ˈjen-rət \

Definition of regenerate (Entry 3 of 3)

: one that is regenerated: such as

a : an individual who is spiritually reborn

b(1) : an organism that has undergone regeneration

(2) : a regenerated body part

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Other words from regenerate

Adjective

regenerately adverb
regenerateness noun

Verb

regenerable \ri-ˈje-nə-rə-bəl, -ˈjen-rə- \ adjective

Examples of regenerate in a Sentence

Verb

The lizard's tail can regenerate. The lizard is able to regenerate its tail. The tissue cells can regenerate themselves.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

Likewise, if an athlete does not allow those tissues to regenerate and rest, inflammation in the area will continue to worsen. Cincinnati.com, "Stay healthy: Overuse injuries in one sport athletes," 9 July 2018 The donor’s remaining liver regenerates itself and returns to normal volume and capacity within a couple months after the surgery. Steve Schering, chicagotribune.com, "'I am a fighter': Potential donors reach out to ailing Oak Park police chief in need of liver transplant," 11 May 2018 Researchers have known for decades that a group of unspecialized stem cells called neoblasts help planaria regenerate. Elizabeth Pennisi, Science | AAAS, "This one, newly discovered cell can remake a whole animal," 14 June 2018 Stem cells have long been recognized for their ability to reproduce and regenerate tissue. Washington Post, "California, Florida stem cell clinics target of US lawsuit," 9 May 2018 Fortunately, these seedlings are easy to hoe away and once taken down to the soil don't regenerate. Jeff Lowenfels, Anchorage Daily News, "Here’s what’s eating your currant bushes and ‘spitting’ on your wild roses," 13 July 2018 Should the storm regenerate, rough seas can continue to plague swimmers and boaters along the Southeast coast, AccuWeather said. Doyle Rice, USA TODAY, "Tropical Storm Chris set to become hurricane off East Coast with life-threatening surf, rip currents," 10 July 2018 The hurricane center said there was a possibility that Beryl’s remnant could regenerate into a tropical cyclone in a few days while moving across the Bahamas. Washington Post, "Beryl dissipates after Dominica, easing threat to others," 9 July 2018 Huberman speaks candidly about potential weaknesses in his hypothesis: While the neurons could regenerate all the way up to the brain in tiny mice, the much greater distance in humans could prove too far to traverse. Rebecca Robbins, STAT, "A daredevil researcher’s latest quest: to restore sight lost to glaucoma using virtual reality," 2 July 2018

Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

Be warned: your commander health bar regenerates very slowly, and getting killed while spying on a foe (or waiting for your map-warping burrow) will freeze you out for a few seconds' worth of respawn. Sam Machkovech, Ars Technica, "Tooth and Tail review: Delightful, rodent-riddled StarCraft for the rest of us," 17 Sep. 2017 Rule 6: Get Eight Hours of Good Sleep Each Night Sleep is when your body recovers and regenerates. Anthony J. Yeung, Esquire, "7 Simple Rules for Getting Lean in 2017," 29 Dec. 2016

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'regenerate.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of regenerate

Adjective

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1525, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1551, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for regenerate

Adjective

Middle English regenerat, from Latin regeneratus, past participle of regenerare to regenerate, from re- + generare to beget — more at generate

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Time Traveler for regenerate

The first known use of regenerate was in the 15th century

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More Definitions for regenerate

regenerate

verb

English Language Learners Definition of regenerate

biology : to grow again after being lost, damaged, etc.

: to give new life to (something)

regenerate

verb
re·gen·er·ate | \ ri-ˈje-nə-ˌrāt \
regenerated; regenerating

Kids Definition of regenerate

: to grow (as a lost body part) once more

regenerate

verb
re·gen·er·ate | \ ri-ˈjen-ə-ˌrāt \
regenerated; regenerating

Medical Definition of regenerate 

intransitive verb

1 : to become formed again

2 : to undergo regeneration the human bladder and liver can regenerate when injured

transitive verb

1 : to generate or produce anew especially : to replace (a body part) by a new growth of tissue

2 : to produce again chemically sometimes in a physically changed form

Other words from regenerate

regenerable \-ˈjen-(ə-)rə-bəl \ adjective

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