recede

verb (1)
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Definition of recede

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

1a : to move back or away : withdraw a receding hairline
b : to slant backward
2 : to grow less or smaller : diminish, decrease a receding deficit

recede

verb (2)
re·​cede | \ (ˌ)rē-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding; recedes

Definition of recede (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to cede back to a former possessor

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Choose the Right Synonym for recede

Verb (1)

recede, retreat, retract, back mean to move backward. recede implies a gradual withdrawing from a forward or high fixed point in time or space. the flood waters gradually receded retreat implies withdrawal from a point or position reached. retreating soldiers retract implies drawing back from an extended position. a cat retracting its claws back is used with up, down, out, or off to refer to any retrograde motion. backed off on the throttle

Examples of recede in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb There is a crispness to the hard edges of the blocks of color – the jacket, the T-shirt, the house, that make the colors pop while the facial details recede into a more quiet zone. Tom Teicholz, Forbes, "Artist Amy Sherald Delivers ‘The Great American Fact’," 15 Apr. 2021 But the administration would be foolish to suppose the surge will recede on its own. Bret Stephens New York Times, Star Tribune, "Biden should finish the wall," 6 Apr. 2021 That suggests if incoming data over the remainder of the year are as upbeat as investors and many economists expect, uncertainty should recede and officials may feel confident enough to revise their rate expectations. Greg Ip, WSJ, "Powell Can’t Let Markets See Him Sweat," 18 Mar. 2021 The findings, published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, suggest this commotion can be tapped for useful clues as to how quickly glaciers may recede as temperatures climb—and thus how fast global sea levels might rise. Stephanie Pappas, Scientific American, "How Fast Are Glaciers Melting? Just Listen to Them," 29 May 2018 The pandemic may mostly recede by summer because of widespread vaccination, and a broad reopening of public life may change the dynamic that has led to the rise in violence. Jeff Asher, Star Tribune, "Murder rate remains elevated as new crime reporting system begins," 16 Mar. 2021 The eviction moratorium will push some of those problems into the spring, when the pandemic is expected to recede as the pace of vaccinations increases. New York Times, "New York Halted Evictions. But What Happens When the Ban Ends?," 1 Jan. 2021 But the challenges of 21st century journalism seldom recede. Los Angeles Times, "A one-woman watchdog torments the far right in deep-red Northern California," 15 Mar. 2021 As the rains recede in their village of Tarauna Bhojpur in Bihar’s Araria district, the family switches back to burning wood for daily cooking. Aarefa Johari, Quartz, "Modi’s much-hyped cooking gas scheme for the poor has started failing on the ground," 9 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The military-style, heavily armed police tactical teams that are more prevalent these days would recede from view, deployed in only the most dangerous scenarios. BostonGlobe.com, "They say reimagine the police. What would that look like?," 24 Apr. 2021 But the administration would be foolish to suppose the surge will recede on its own. Bret Stephens New York Times, Star Tribune, "Biden should finish the wall," 6 Apr. 2021 The findings, published this month in Geophysical Research Letters, suggest this commotion can be tapped for useful clues as to how quickly glaciers may recede as temperatures climb—and thus how fast global sea levels might rise. Stephanie Pappas, Scientific American, "How Fast Are Glaciers Melting? Just Listen to Them," 29 May 2018 As the rains recede in their village of Tarauna Bhojpur in Bihar’s Araria district, the family switches back to burning wood for daily cooking. Aarefa Johari, Quartz, "Modi’s much-hyped cooking gas scheme for the poor has started failing on the ground," 9 Mar. 2021 That suggests if incoming data over the remainder of the year are as upbeat as investors and many economists expect, uncertainty should recede and officials may feel confident enough to revise their rate expectations. Greg Ip, WSJ, "Powell Can’t Let Markets See Him Sweat," 18 Mar. 2021 The pandemic may mostly recede by summer because of widespread vaccination, and a broad reopening of public life may change the dynamic that has led to the rise in violence. Jeff Asher, Star Tribune, "Murder rate remains elevated as new crime reporting system begins," 16 Mar. 2021 But the challenges of 21st century journalism seldom recede. Los Angeles Times, "A one-woman watchdog torments the far right in deep-red Northern California," 15 Mar. 2021 But someday, the Hex will recede and we’ll be left with nothing but the grim truth. Abraham Riesman, Vulture, "WandaVision Finale: Ding, Dong, the Witch Is Sad," 5 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'recede.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of recede

Verb (1)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb (2)

1771, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for recede

Verb (1)

Middle English, from Latin recedere to go back, from re- + cedere to go

Verb (2)

re- + cede

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Time Traveler for recede

Time Traveler

The first known use of recede was in the 15th century

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Statistics for recede

Last Updated

27 Apr 2021

Cite this Entry

“Recede.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/recede. Accessed 7 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for recede

recede

verb
re·​cede | \ ri-ˈsēd How to pronounce recede (audio) \
receded; receding

Kids Definition of recede

1 : to move back or away Floodwaters are receding.
2 : to become smaller or weaker … I heard … footsteps receding.— Avi, Crispin

More from Merriam-Webster on recede

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for recede

Nglish: Translation of recede for Spanish Speakers

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