proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) , prə-\
proclaimed; proclaiming; proclaims

Definition of proclaim

transitive verb

1a : to declare publicly, typically insistently, proudly, or defiantly and in either speech or writing : announce
b : to give outward indication of : show his manner proclaimed his genteel upbringing
2 : to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty proclaim the country a republic
3 : to praise or glorify openly or publicly : extol proclaimed the rescue workers' efforts

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Other Words from proclaim

proclaimer noun

Choose the Right Synonym for proclaim

declare, announce, proclaim, promulgate mean to make known publicly. declare implies explicitness and usually formality in making known. the referee declared the contest a draw announce implies the declaration of something for the first time. announced their engagement at a party proclaim implies declaring clearly, forcefully, and authoritatively. the president proclaimed a national day of mourning promulgate implies the proclaiming of a dogma, doctrine, or law. promulgated an edict of religious toleration

Did You Know?

The pro- in proclaim means "forward, out", so a proclamation is an "outward" statement intended for the public. We often think of proclamations as something issued by monarchs or dictators, but Lincoln was able to issue his Emancipation Proclamation because as president he had the power to free the slaves in certain areas. At a slightly lower level, a governor may proclaim a day in honor of the state's firemen, a movie critic may proclaim a director to be the best of all, or you may proclaim your New Year's resolutions to a crowd of friends.

Examples of proclaim in a Sentence

She proclaimed that she will run for governor. The President proclaimed a national day of mourning. He took command of the government and proclaimed himself emperor. The magazine proclaimed him to be the best player in baseball. He proclaimed his love for her in a poem. His behavior proclaimed his good upbringing.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Dance historians are fond of proclaiming that dance, alone among the Western arts, is passed down hand to hand, like folk arts in traditional societies. Joan Acocella, The New Yorker, "Can Modern Dance Be Preserved?," 24 June 2019 Others proclaimed him to be an inspiration for investors, entrepreneurs and others who must take calculated risks. Julia Jacobs, New York Times, "James Holzhauer’s ‘Jeopardy!’ Streak Ends Just Shy of a Record," 3 June 2019 In a 10-minute YouTube rant uploaded in late May, the man accused of stabbing 11-year-old Josue Flores nearly 20 times proclaimed his innocence as detectives built a case against him. Jay R. Jordan, Houston Chronicle, "‘No DNA test could ever link me to him,’ accused killer of Josue Flores claims," 18 June 2019 By that time, Lisbon had already been proclaiming its progress in a just war against African pagans on behalf of the Catholic Church. Howard W. French, The New York Review of Books, "Africa’s Lost Kingdoms," 17 June 2019 In 1916 that President Woodrow Wilson officially proclaimed June 14 Flag Day. San Diego Union-Tribune, "From the Archives: Flag Day," 14 June 2019 The shoes proclaim power but also an eagerness to demonstrate fluency in a specific idiom of youth culture. Troy Patterson, The New Yorker, "The Normcore Opulence of Preachers Wearing Four-Figure Sneakers," 14 June 2019 Attendees were gifted screaming yellow tote bags proclaiming that the wackiest looter shooter of all time is indeed returning. Brittany Vincent, Popular Mechanics, "E3 2019 Is an Assault on Gamers' Senses," 12 June 2019 In their understanding of Europe’s past, some would emphasise the Judaeo-Christian inheritance, while others would stress the struggle against clerical authority proclaimed by the Enlightenment. Erasmus, The Economist, "Europe’s secularists worry about the rise of Christian-nativist populism," 11 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'proclaim.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of proclaim

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for proclaim

Middle English proclamen, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French proclamer, from Latin proclamare, from pro- before + clamare to cry out — more at pro-, claim

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Statistics for proclaim

Last Updated

9 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for proclaim

The first known use of proclaim was in the 14th century

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More Definitions for proclaim

proclaim

verb

English Language Learners Definition of proclaim

: to say or state (something) in a public, official, or definite way : to declare or announce (something)
formal : to show (something) clearly

proclaim

verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \
proclaimed; proclaiming

Kids Definition of proclaim

: to announce publicly : declare The president proclaimed a holiday.

proclaim

transitive verb
pro·​claim | \ prō-ˈklām How to pronounce proclaim (audio) \

Legal Definition of proclaim

: to declare or declare to be solemnly, officially, or formally proclaim an amnesty

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More from Merriam-Webster on proclaim

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for proclaim

Spanish Central: Translation of proclaim

Nglish: Translation of proclaim for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of proclaim for Arabic Speakers

Comments on proclaim

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characterized by aphorism

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