poop

1 of 6

verb (1)

pooped; pooping; poops

intransitive verb

informal
: defecate
So while my wife's horse trotted briskly off into the scenery, looking for low branches to run under, my horse just stood there, eating and poopingDave Barry

poop

2 of 6

noun (1)

1
informal : feces, excrement
As a brand-new father, a new substance plays a big role in my life: poop.Scott Kramer
As the years go by, there's trouble in paradise, and it isn't just the ubiquitous goose poop.Katherine Lanpher
2
informal : the act of defecating
I have a complaint against dog owners that take their dogs for a walk but do not take a bag, then let their dog stop by people's mailboxes and take a poop.Billie Johnston

poop

3 of 6

verb (2)

pooped; pooping; poops

intransitive verb

slang : to become exhausted
poop out

transitive verb

slang : to put out of breath
also : to tire out

poop

4 of 6

noun (2)

1
: an enclosed superstructure at the stern of a ship above the main deck
2
obsolete : stern

poop

5 of 6

verb (3)

pooped; pooping; poops

transitive verb

1
: to break over the stern of
2
: to ship (a sea or wave) over the stern

poop

6 of 6

noun (3)

slang

Examples of poop in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
This year’s game used 600 pee pads, 200 toys, 30 water bowls, 10 bags of treats and 200 poop bags. Katcy Stephan, Variety, 9 Feb. 2024 From creating new Christmas characters to sourcing actual deer poop, these are stories about keeping the magic of the season alive — not just for the kids, but for the entire family. Justine McDaniel, Washington Post, 22 Dec. 2023 Then there are the P’s: pesticides, pollution, poop, pee and pretty much anything that may be in the great outdoors. Bruce Y. Lee, Forbes, 11 Dec. 2023 By the mid-1980s, the animals numbered over 1,000, and neighboring communities were complaining that the monkeys had destroyed mangroves, polluted the water with their poop, and even escaped to other islands. Erika Fry, Fortune, 27 Jan. 2024 The piles of poop led to the discovery of four previously unknown colonies of emperor penguins, a species threatened by climate change, according to a Jan. 24 news release from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). Brendan Rascius, Miami Herald, 24 Jan. 2024 Japan is, to put it mildly, really interested in poop. Sara Holdren, Vulture, 17 Jan. 2024 Some of this substance comes out in poop, some goes back to your liver, and a bit of it leaves your body through urine. Alyssa Hui, Verywell Health, 12 Jan. 2024 Norris noted that water running over surfaces like streets, lawns and roofs can carry pollutants such as dog poop, car brake dust, soap from car washing, and lawn fertilizers that go straight into storm drains. Caron Golden, San Diego Union-Tribune, 30 Dec. 2023
Verb
Maya Erskine wanted to be the one to poop her pants. Sonia Rao, Washington Post, 8 Feb. 2024 Roach poop among reasons a Coral Gables eatery failed inspection Nameste Miami is back open but still needs a follow-up inspection. David J. Neal, Miami Herald, 26 Jan. 2024 Coffee poops are a real pain (literally) in the butt. Ayana Underwood, SELF, 30 Jan. 2024 If your primary complaint about Hamlet has always been that there’s not nearly enough poop in it, then HAMLET | TOILET is here to help you fart-dels bear. Sara Holdren, Vulture, 17 Jan. 2024 This can happen if the gastropods eat the rat poop or if the ravenous larvae just bore into their soft bodies. Beth Mole, Ars Technica, 22 Sep. 2023 Animals in torpor are still awake most of the time and sometimes leave their hideout to pee and poop, stretch out in the sunshine on a sunny day, and have a little snack. Sofia Quaglia, Discover Magazine, 6 Dec. 2023 The answer, of course, is yes, bears most certainly do poop in the woods. Steven Hill, Field & Stream, 29 Nov. 2023 Allen also noted a drawback of training schools: no one wants to poop with an audience. Francyne Zeltser, Parents, 29 Oct. 2023 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'poop.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Verb (1)

earlier, to break wind, from Middle English poupen to make a gulping sound, of imitative origin

Verb (2)

origin unknown

Noun (2)

Middle English, from Anglo-French pope, from Latin puppis

Noun (3)

perhaps from poop entry 2

First Known Use

Verb (1)

circa 1903, in the meaning defined above

Noun (1)

circa 1890, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1927, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Noun (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 2

Verb (3)

1727, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (3)

circa 1940, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of poop was in the 15th century

Dictionary Entries Near poop

Cite this Entry

“Poop.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/poop. Accessed 28 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

poop

noun
ˈpüp
: an enclosed raised structure at the stern of a ship
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