peril

noun
per·​il | \ ˈper-əl How to pronounce peril (audio) , ˈpe-rəl\

Definition of peril

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : exposure to the risk of being injured, destroyed, or lost : danger fire put the city in peril
2 : something that imperils or endangers : risk lessen the perils of the streets

peril

verb
per·​il | \ ˈper-əl How to pronounce peril (audio) , ˈpe-rəl\
periled also perilled; periling also perilling

Definition of peril (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to expose to danger

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Examples of peril in a Sentence

Noun Just last week he issued a statement encouraging all Iraqis to participate in the election scheduled for January, and he called on the Iraqi government to start registering voters. The powers that be in Iraq ignore him at their peril. — Johanna McGeary, Time, 25 Oct. 2004 One lesson of both the law-school and the Paulin controversies may be the peril of making free-speech judgments at Internet speed. — Jeffrey Toobin, New Yorker, 27 Jan. 2003 The old man rose and towered over Cameron, and then plunged down upon him, and clutched at his throat with terrible stifling hands. The harsh contact, the pain awakened Cameron to his peril before it was too late. — Zane Grey, Desert Gold, 1913 People are unaware of the peril these miners face each day. She described global warming as “a growing peril.” Verb … she did more harm than all Frederick's diplomacy could repair, and perilled her chance of her inheritance like a giddy heedless creature as she was. — William Makepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, 1848 a tribute to the men and women who, as firefighters, peril their lives daily
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Easy money tends to blind people to very real perils, in the view of the Jerome Levy Forecasting Center. Larry Light, Fortune, "The Global Collapse in Interest Rates May be Setting Investors Up for a Crash," 9 Aug. 2019 Better yet, the heavy, rustic furnishings can hold up to the perils of day-to-day life. Robert Rufino, House Beautiful, "Tour a Tribeca Loft Where Industrial Design Meets Family Living," 1 Aug. 2019 The conclusion of Mueller's investigation does not remove legal peril for the president. al, "Congress and the country wait for findings in Mueller report," 23 Mar. 2019 What’s more, the episode deepened the president’s legal peril. Matt Ford, The New Republic, "The Mistake That May Haunt Trump Forever," 9 May 2018 Our infrastructure, our quality of life – our sanity – are in peril. Mario Dianda, The Mercury News, "Letters to The Daily News," 6 Sep. 2019 The teams in the Western Conference, save for LAFC, are essentially standings yoyos, with things so tightly wound that going from feeling safe about playoff hopes to being in peril can be decided by a single result. Avi Creditor, SI.com, "The MLS XI, Week 26: The West is Wild; Philly, NYCFC Clinch," 2 Sep. 2019 Some responded as if a family member were in peril. San Diego Union-Tribune, "Valerie Harper, TV’s Rhoda, has died at 80," 30 Aug. 2019 Some responded as if a family member were in peril. John Rogers, Anchorage Daily News, "Valerie Harper, TV’s Rhoda, dies at age 80," 30 Aug. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'peril.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of peril

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1567, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for peril

Noun

Middle English, borrowed from Anglo-French, going back to Latin perīculum "test, trial, risk, danger," going back to *perei-tlom, from *perei- (of uncertain origin) + *-tlom, instrumental suffix (going back to Indo-European)

Note: Latin perīculum has traditionally been explained as a derivative from a proposed Indo-European verbal base *per- "test, risk," seen also in perītus "practiced, experienced," experior, experīrī "to put to the test, attempt, have experience of, undergo" (see experience entry 1) and opperior, opperīrī "to wait, wait for"; these have been compared with Greek peîra "trial, attempt, experience," peiráomai, peirâsthai "to make a trial of, attempt," émpeiros "experienced" (see empiric)—going back to *per-i̯a—and more tentatively with Germanic *fērō "pursuit, danger" (see fear entry 2). This *per- "test, risk" is then taken further as a semantic derivative of *per- "cross, pass" (see fare entry 1). Alternatively, if the formative -i- represents the Indo-European present-tense suffix *-ei̯-/-i-, Latin peri-/perī- in these words fits naturally with Indo-European *perh3-/pr̥h3- "bring forth, give rise to, produce" (if taken as a middle verb "give rise to within oneself, experience, undergo"), with *pr̥h3-i- yielding Latin pariō, parere "to give birth to" (see parturient entry 1) and *perh3-ei̯- yielding the per-ī- of perīculum, etc. It is unclear if the base of experior and opperior contains par- or per-, as the simplex verb is not attested. (Cf. Michiel de Vaan, "PIE i-presents, s-presents, and their reflexes in Latin," Glotta, Band 87 [2011], pp. 23-36.)

Verb

derivative of peril entry 1

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Statistics for peril

Last Updated

24 Oct 2019

Time Traveler for peril

The first known use of peril was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for peril

peril

noun
How to pronounce peril (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of peril

somewhat formal + literary
: the possibility that you will be hurt or killed or that something unpleasant or bad will happen
: something that is likely to cause injury, pain, harm, or loss

peril

noun
per·​il | \ ˈper-əl How to pronounce peril (audio) \

Kids Definition of peril

1 : the state of being in great danger The storm put our ship in peril.
2 : a cause or source of danger the perils of skydiving

peril

noun
per·​il | \ ˈper-əl How to pronounce peril (audio) \

Legal Definition of peril

1 : exposure to the risk of death, destruction, or loss
2 : the cause of a loss (as of property) insured their home against fire, floods, and other perils — compare risk

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More from Merriam-Webster on peril

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for peril

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with peril

Spanish Central: Translation of peril

Nglish: Translation of peril for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of peril for Arabic Speakers

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