parole

noun
pa·​role | \ pə-ˈrōl How to pronounce parole (audio) \

Definition of parole

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a promise made with or confirmed by a pledge of one's honor especially : the promise of a prisoner of war to fulfill stated conditions in consideration of his release
2 : a watchword given only to officers of the guard and of the day
3 : a conditional release of a prisoner serving an indeterminate or unexpired sentence
4a : language viewed as a specific individual usage : performance
b : a linguistic act — compare langue

parole

verb
paroled; paroling

Definition of parole (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to release (a prisoner) on parole

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Other Words from parole

Noun

parole adjective

Examples of parole in a Sentence

Noun

The prisoner will be eligible for parole after three years. She robbed a bank while out on parole. The prisoner was released on parole.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

He was sentenced to a mere six-and-a-half years, becoming eligible for parole in three. Frank Scheck, The Hollywood Reporter, "'16 Shots': Film Review," 7 June 2019 Under German law, Hoegel cannot serve consecutive life sentences, but new convictions may prohibit him from being eligible for parole within the next several years. Lindsey Bever, Anchorage Daily News, "German nurse sentenced for killing 85 patients," 6 June 2019 Under Kentucky law, Breeden will be eligible for parole after 20 years. Cameron Knight, Cincinnati.com, "Northern Kentucky man gets life sentence for child sex abuse," 5 June 2019 Larry Framness could be eligible for parole in 2029. CBS News, "NCIS probe of U.S. Marine's attempted murder in Kuwait reveals a conspiracy of secrets and lies," 5 June 2019 Because the crime is classified as a dangerous felony under Missouri law, Clayton must serve 17 years before becoming eligible for parole, according to the prosecutor’s office. Robert A. Cronkleton, kansascity, "KC teen gets 20 years in prison for robbing people in cellphone sale set up online," 4 June 2019 With good behavior and time already served in jail, Aranda is eligible for parole in 12 years. David K. Li, NBC News, "Mall of America attacker gets 19 years for throwing boy over railing," 3 June 2019 As of right now, Gypsy Rose isn't up for parole until 2024. Alexis Jones, Marie Claire, "The Act's Gypsy Rose Blanchard Is Secretly Engaged," 12 Apr. 2019 There’s one in particular that has caught her interest, from an inmate who isn’t up for parole until 2021. Jonathan Van Meter, Vogue, "The Awakening of Kim Kardashian West," 10 Apr. 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

He was transferred to a federal hospital in Springfield, Missouri, and paroled, thanks to intervention by President Franklin Roosevelt after a visit from high-level San Antonio politicians. Paula Allen, ExpressNews.com, "Prominent businessman on San Antonio’s East Side was both lawbreaker and benefactor," 8 June 2019 He was paroled in 1985 and returned to the St. Louis area. Fox News, "Convicted pedophile charged in 1993 kidnapping, murder of 9-year-old Missouri girl," 6 June 2019 Velasquez, known by his nickname Popeye, was paroled in 2014 after confessing to hundreds of murders and spending 22 years in jail for plotting the murder of a former Colombian presidential candidate. Fox News, "Colombia re-arrests Pablo Escobar's hitman for extortion," 25 May 2018 During that time, prisoners have received life terms with the possibility they could be paroled if the governor signed off — and Blumberg’s commission has recommended release in some cases. Ann E. Marimow, Washington Post, "Who will stay, who will go free? The question at the heart of a parole commissioner’s job," 19 Mar. 2018 But now Jameson, who has since been paroled, will have another chance to bring his now 16-year-old case. Greg Moran, sandiegouniontribune.com, "State high court strikes down rule requiring poor to pay for own court reporter in civil courts," 6 July 2018 Lima received the stiffest sentence—16 years at Leavenworth—but was paroled after serving eight. Peter Duffy, WSJ, "‘Inspector Oldfield and the Black Hand Society’ Review: The Mafia and the Mail," 20 Aug. 2018 Perry spent 10 years in prison before being paroled. Fox News, "26 years after conviction, 2 exonerated in false rape claim," 8 May 2018 The decision to parole the parents of the younger children was announced hours before the Flores decision was issued. Kristina Davis, sandiegouniontribune.com, "Trump administration says detained parents must decide whether to keep families intact," 10 July 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'parole.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of parole

Noun

1531, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1776, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for parole

Noun

French, speech, parole, from Middle French, from Late Latin parabola speech — more at parable

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Statistics for parole

Last Updated

12 Jun 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for parole

The first known use of parole was in 1531

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More Definitions for parole

parole

noun

English Language Learners Definition of parole

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: permission given to a prisoner to leave prison before the end of a sentence usually as a reward for behaving well

parole

verb

English Language Learners Definition of parole (Entry 2 of 2)

: to release (a prisoner) on parole

parole

noun
pa·​role | \ pə-ˈrōl How to pronounce parole (audio) \

Kids Definition of parole

: an early release of a prisoner

parole

noun
pa·​role | \ pə-ˈrōl How to pronounce parole (audio) \

Medical Definition of parole

: a conditional release given to a psychiatric patient in a hospital before discharge enabling the patient to visit freely various designated areas on the hospital grounds or beyond its limits

Other Words from parole

parolable adjective
parole transitive verb paroled; paroling

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parole

noun
pa·​role | \ pə-ˈrōl How to pronounce parole (audio) \

Legal Definition of parole

: a conditional release of a prisoner who has served part of a sentence and who remains under the control of and in the legal custody of a parole authority — compare probation

History and Etymology for parole

Old French, speech, word, prisoner's word of honor to fulfill stated conditions, from Late Latin parabola speech, parable, from Greek parabolē comparison

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More from Merriam-Webster on parole

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with parole

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for parole

Spanish Central: Translation of parole

Nglish: Translation of parole for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of parole for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about parole

Comments on parole

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