dipole

noun
di·​pole | \ ˈdī-ˌpōl How to pronounce dipole (audio) \

Definition of dipole

1a : a pair of equal and opposite electric charges or magnetic poles of opposite sign separated especially by a small distance
b : a body or system (such as a molecule) having such charges or poles
2 : a radio antenna consisting of two horizontal rods in line with each other with their ends slightly separated

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Other Words from dipole

dipolar \ ˈdī-​ˌpō-​lər How to pronounce dipolar (audio) , ˌdī-​ˈpō-​ \ adjective

Examples of dipole in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web The changes in trade wind strength can therefore result in the formation of tropical ocean dipoles. Jennifer Fitchett, Quartz Africa, "The unexpected link between Kenya’s unusual torrential flooding and Australia’s bushfires," 16 Feb. 2020 Earlier results have shown that the fine structure is slightly different along a specific axis of the Universe, called a dipole. Chris Lee, Ars Technica, "Fine structure constant may vary with space, constant in time," 28 Apr. 2020 The 2019 to 2020 dipole has been unusually strong, with a temperature differential of 2°C. Jennifer Fitchett, Quartz Africa, "The unexpected link between Kenya’s unusual torrential flooding and Australia’s bushfires," 16 Feb. 2020 Scott: The magnetic dipoles tried to orient according to the field, but— Joyce: No, no, no. Rhett Allain, WIRED, "The Physics of Falling Magnets in Stranger Things Season 3," 9 Aug. 2019 This dipole cycles between these extremes over three to five year periods, ordinarily with a 1°C difference in sea surface temperature. Jennifer Fitchett, Quartz Africa, "The unexpected link between Kenya’s unusual torrential flooding and Australia’s bushfires," 16 Feb. 2020 The dipole is defined by positive and negative sea surface temperature variations. Peter Fimrite, SFChronicle.com, "Those big wildfires in Australia look familiar — they’re much like California’s," 10 Jan. 2020 The Van Allen Probes are retired, but a subsequent instrument, the DSX dipole antenna, will explore the radiation belts and beam very low frequency (VLF) radio waves into them to see what happens. Caroline Delbert, Popular Mechanics, "How Would You Scrub Radiation from Space After a Nuclear Attack?," 27 Dec. 2019 This dipole model has two other problems, said Rubin and Heitlauf. Quanta Magazine, "No Dark Energy? No Chance, Cosmologists Contend," 17 Dec. 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dipole.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dipole

1912, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for dipole

International Scientific Vocabulary

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Time Traveler for dipole

Time Traveler

The first known use of dipole was in 1912

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Statistics for dipole

Cite this Entry

“Dipole.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dipole. Accessed 19 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for dipole

dipole

noun
di·​pole | \ ˈdī-ˌpōl How to pronounce dipole (audio) \

Medical Definition of dipole

1 : a pair of equal and opposite electric charges or magnetic poles of opposite sign separated by a small distance
2 : a body or system (as a molecule) having such charges

More from Merriam-Webster on dipole

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dipole

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