nickname

noun
nick·​name | \ ˈnik-ˌnām How to pronounce nickname (audio) \

Definition of nickname

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a usually descriptive name given instead of or in addition to the one belonging to a person, place, or thing
2 : a familiar form of a proper name (as of a person or a city)

nickname

verb
nicknamed; nicknaming; nicknames

Definition of nickname (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

2 : to give a nickname to

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Other Words from nickname

Verb

nicknamer noun

Synonyms for nickname

Synonyms: Noun

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History of Nickname

It might look like nickname is a compound noun formed by adding nick and name together, but the actual history of this word is a bit more complicated. It was formed by metanalysis, or the changing of the division of words based upon how they sound together. In this case, the Middle English word eke, meaning “also” or “in addition,” was joined with name to form ekename—literally, “also-name,” used for a secondary or unofficial name in the late Middle Ages. Over time, an ekename became a nickname presumably because eke had become less familiar as a word. Needless to say, nick in this case doesn’t mean “also” or anything else, it just represents a comfortable and familiar alternative to the word’s original spelling.

Examples of nickname in a Sentence

Noun His mother gave him the nickname “Winky” when he was a baby. Earvin “Magic” Johnson got his nickname from the way he handled a basketball.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The moment almost immediately went viral, earning Borja his nickname and also an abundance of devoted fans who delighted in his sharp personality. Andrea Towers, EW.com, "Juan Joya Borja, comedian known as 'El Risitas' who went viral for laughing meme, dies at 65: Reports," 29 Apr. 2021 Or showed up with a necklace with a Kool-Aid man pendant in diamonds, a nod to his nickname . BostonGlobe.com, "The 15 worst Patriots draft picks of the Bill Belichick era," 27 Apr. 2021 Fed by the confluence of the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers, the network of marshy lagoons gives the park its nickname. Adam Erace, Fortune, "Why Shudder, a streaming service dedicated to horror movies, brought me comfort during the pandemic," 25 Apr. 2021 Beyond merely being fun to say, hoodoos are natural rock formations in the shape of thin spires, inspiring their more charming nickname, fairy chimneys. Brandon Schultz, Forbes, "Witchcraft, And The Other Top-Rated Things To Do In America’s 10 Most Popular National Parks," 21 Apr. 2021 Occasionally, the executive would reveal the skills that earned him his nickname. Andrew Greif, Los Angeles Times, "How Elgin Baylor handled the toughest job in sports: Working for Donald Sterling," 19 Apr. 2021 The Mississippi River town of La Crescent earned its nickname, the Apple Capital of Minnesota, after its first orchard was planted in the 1850s. Kerri Westenberg, Star Tribune, "Three ways to see the blooms in Minnesota this spring," 16 Apr. 2021 And the Washington football team dropped its nickname, with the Cleveland baseball team next. The Enquirer, "Mike Bass column: How do you take politics — and politicians — out of sports?," 15 Apr. 2021 But his nickname wasn’t derived from his savvy on the court. Richard Goldstein, New York Times, "Bobby Leonard, Hall of Fame Basketball Coach, Dies at 88," 15 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The hurler, nicknamed Thor, has been among the top pitchers in the Mets’ starting rotation and in baseball. Fox News, "Mets' Noah Syndergaard tries comparing MLB coronavirus deal to his NYC rent fight," 26 May 2020 After his haul is loaded onto the boat, Parker stays overnight with the merchandise, then returns home on the high tide the next morning to restock the shelves in his store, nicknamed ToshCo, with up to $20,000 worth of products. Cathy Free, Anchorage Daily News, "Welcome to 'ToshCo’: Gustavus man travels 14 hours by boat each week to fetch food and supplies for his neighbors," 20 May 2020 Rabbit images appear throughout the bar’s exterior and interior; customers are playfully nicknamed conejitos (little rabbits). Eric Velasco, al, "Mayawell bar familiarizes Birmingham with agave spirits," 12 May 2020 This started dawning on people after the California Employment Development Department began processing applications for pandemic benefits, nicknamed PUA, on Tuesday. Kathleen Pender, SFChronicle.com, "Why some self-employed Californians are mad about unemployment benefits," 2 May 2020 English joined Nelson’s band, nicknamed the Family, in 1966 and continued with him for most of his long career. Washington Post, "Paul English, Willie Nelson’s longtime drummer, has died," 12 Feb. 2020 As the world was slowly starting to come to terms with our new stay-at-home mandate, the beloved DJ curated a party for thousands of people right in their living room, which was also nicknamed Club Quarantine. Nandi Howard, Essence, "Will Smith's Bel-Air Athletics And DJ D-Nice Collaborate On Club Quarantine Hoodie," 6 Apr. 2020 Microsoft said the hacking group, which is nicknamed Phosphorus, successfully accessed four accounts, though none belonging to current or former government officials. Alyssa Newcomb, Fortune, "How Iran-linked Hackers Tried to Compromise a Presidential Campaign," 4 Oct. 2019 Not many club sides wear green, which probably explains why Saint-Etienne are simply nicknamed as such. SI.com, "50 Greatest Football Shirts of All Time," 28 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'nickname.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of nickname

Noun

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1536, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for nickname

Noun

Middle English nekename additional name, alteration (resulting from misdivision of an ekename) of ekename, from eke eke, also + name name

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Time Traveler for nickname

Time Traveler

The first known use of nickname was in the 15th century

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Statistics for nickname

Last Updated

11 May 2021

Cite this Entry

“Nickname.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nickname. Accessed 12 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for nickname

nickname

noun

English Language Learners Definition of nickname

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a name (such as "Moose" or "Lady Bird") that is different from your real name but is what your family, friends, etc., call you when they are talking to you or about you

nickname

verb

English Language Learners Definition of nickname (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give (someone) a name that is not that person's real name : to give a nickname to (someone)

nickname

noun
nick·​name | \ ˈnik-ˌnām How to pronounce nickname (audio) \

Kids Definition of nickname

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a usually descriptive name used in addition to a person's given name My brother had the nickname “Nosy.”
2 : a familiar form of a proper name “Bill” and “Willie” are nicknames for “William.”

nickname

verb
nicknamed; nicknaming

Kids Definition of nickname (Entry 2 of 2)

: to give a usually descriptive name to that is additional to a given name

Comments on nickname

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