necessarily

adverb
nec·​es·​sar·​i·​ly | \ ˌne-sə-ˈser-ə-lē How to pronounce necessarily (audio) \

Definition of necessarily

1 : of necessity : unavoidably The audience was necessarily small. This endeavor necessarily involves some risk.
2 : as a logical result or consequence … a holocaust is a disaster, but a disaster is not necessarily a holocaust.— Harry Shaw

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Synonyms & Antonyms for necessarily

Synonyms

Antonyms

  • unnecessarily
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Examples of necessarily in a Sentence

the argument that the existence of the universe necessarily implies the existence of an all-powerful being responsible for creating it
Recent Examples on the Web That said, some skin-care companies make a lot of big claims about what their products can do without necessarily having the evidence to back them up. Sarah Jacoby, SELF, "SELF’s Comprehensive Beginner’s Guide to Skin Care," 8 July 2020 Not all students would necessarily be returning to safe conditions, either because of the continuing threat of the pandemic or other natural and social dangers. Felipe De La Hoz, The New Republic, "Trump’s Reopening Agenda Is Upending International Students’ Futures," 8 July 2020 What works in a lab setting for researchers testing out different vaccine candidates won’t necessarily apply to scientists studying nonpharmaceutical interventions like masks out in the real world. Sara Harrison, Wired, "How to Read Covid-19 Research (and Actually Understand It)," 8 July 2020 Adding more detectives to the homicide unit would not necessarily cost the city more money, although the report suggests the city should pay homicide detectives more. Adam Ferrise, cleveland, "For second time in 4 years, experts tell Cleveland police they need more detectives to solve city’s increasing number of homicides," 7 July 2020 Those can be wonderful, but they aren't necessarily connected to academic gains. Elissa Strauss, CNN, "Summer learning: Does my kid need an extra boost in this year of Covid?," 7 July 2020 The latter can be challenging with Ohio's 13.7% unemployment rate and skills that don't necessarily translate to other positions. Jessie Balmert, The Enquirer, "'There’s no way for the concert industry to normalize:' Gig workers hope Congress extends $600 benefit," 7 July 2020 So the Rosati family would celebrate a day or two later, marking the passage of time, even though Rick didn't necessarily change much from year to year. Katherine Fitzgerald, The Arizona Republic, "Rick Rosati brought his family's pizza to Arizona. Now he'll live on through the legacy," 6 July 2020 But splitting the department doesn’t necessarily get to that. Dominic Fracassa, SFChronicle.com, "Idea of splitting SF Public Works gains steam amid Nuru fraud allegations," 6 July 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'necessarily.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of necessarily

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

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Time Traveler for necessarily

Time Traveler

The first known use of necessarily was in the 14th century

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Statistics for necessarily

Last Updated

11 Jul 2020

Cite this Entry

“Necessarily.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/necessarily. Accessed 16 Jul. 2020.

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More Definitions for necessarily

necessarily

adverb
How to pronounce necessarily (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of necessarily

formal used to say that something is necessary and cannot be changed or avoided

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Comments on necessarily

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