nasty

adjective
nas·​ty | \ ˈna-stē How to pronounce nasty (audio) \
nastier; nastiest

Definition of nasty

1a : disgustingly filthy nasty living conditions
b : physically repugnant a nasty taste
2 : indecent, obscene nasty language
3 : mean, tawdry living a cheap and nasty life— G. B. Shaw
4a : extremely hazardous (see hazardous sense 1) or harmful a nasty undertow
b : causing severe pain or suffering a nasty wound a nasty fall
c : sharply unpleasant : disagreeable nasty weather
5a : difficult to understand or deal with a nasty problem a nasty curveball
b : psychologically unsettling : trying a nasty fear that she was lost
6 : lacking in courtesy or sportsmanship a nasty trick

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Other Words from nasty

nastily \ ˈna-​stə-​lē How to pronounce nasty (audio) \ adverb
nastiness \ ˈna-​stē-​nəs How to pronounce nasty (audio) \ noun
nasty noun

Choose the Right Synonym for nasty

dirty, filthy, foul, nasty, squalid mean conspicuously unclean or impure. dirty emphasizes the presence of dirt more than an emotional reaction to it. a dirty littered street filthy carries a strong suggestion of offensiveness and typically of gradually accumulated dirt that begrimes and besmears. a stained greasy floor, utterly filthy foul implies extreme offensiveness and an accumulation of what is rotten or stinking. a foul-smelling open sewer nasty applies to what is actually foul or is repugnant to one expecting freshness, cleanliness, or sweetness. it's a nasty job to clean up after a sick cat In practice, nasty is often weakened to the point of being no more than a synonym of unpleasant or disagreeable. had a nasty fall his answer gave her a nasty shock squalid adds to the idea of dirtiness and filth that of slovenly neglect. squalid slums All these terms are also applicable to moral uncleanness or baseness or obscenity. dirty then stresses meanness or despicableness don't ask me to do your dirty work , while filthy and foul describe disgusting obscenity or loathsome behavior filthy street language a foul story of lust and greed , and nasty implies a peculiarly offensive unpleasantness. a stand-up comedian known for nasty humor Distinctively, squalid implies sordidness as well as baseness and dirtiness. engaged in a series of squalid affairs

Examples of nasty in a Sentence

She has a nasty habit of biting her fingernails. The medicine left a nasty taste in my mouth. That nasty old man yelled at me just for stepping on his lawn! He sent a nasty letter to the company. She's got quite a nasty temper. He said lots of downright nasty things about her. She called him a few nasty names and left.
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Recent Examples on the Web The Washington defense is nasty and will be a divisional force for years to come. Jori Epstein, USA TODAY, 13 May 2021 To be so nasty to these people and to separate the children from the parents and not care about it. Andrew Mark Miller, Washington Examiner, 11 Mar. 2021 The ex-Giant is tough, nasty, and excels at winning the battle and stopping the inside running game. Steve Silverman, Forbes, 19 May 2021 This show was nasty, combining luscious style with a mood of amoral matriarchal horniness. Ew Staff, EW.com, 10 May 2021 All that said, offices always have been kind of nasty, even before the pandemic. Rachel Gutman, The Atlantic, 3 May 2021 That’s understandable, as parasites can be nasty and parents tend to be very concerned over the health of their children. Mike Wehner, BGR, 25 Feb. 2021 The worst Wagnerians can be a nasty bunch, as Hitler notoriously demonstrated. Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times, 9 Dec. 2020 Restaurant workers would prefer to collect unemployment checks than have to worry about catching and spreading Covid-19, while also dealing with customers who refuse to wear masks or make nasty comments to the wait staff who wear one. Jack Kelly, Forbes, 11 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'nasty.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of nasty

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for nasty

Middle English

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Time Traveler for nasty

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The first known use of nasty was in the 14th century

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Statistics for nasty

Last Updated

7 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Nasty.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/nasty. Accessed 15 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for nasty

nasty

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of nasty

: very unpleasant to see, smell, taste, etc.
: indecent and offensive
: unpleasant and unkind

nasty

adjective
nas·​ty | \ ˈna-stē How to pronounce nasty (audio) \
nastier; nastiest

Kids Definition of nasty

1 : mean entry 2 sense 1 He has a nasty disposition.
2 : very unpleasant nasty weather a nasty taste
3 : very serious : harmful I had a nasty fall on the ice.
4 : very dirty : filthy
5 : indecent nasty jokes

Other Words from nasty

nastily \ ˈna-​stə-​lē \ adverb
nastiness \ ˈna-​stē-​nəs \ noun

More from Merriam-Webster on nasty

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for nasty

Nglish: Translation of nasty for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of nasty for Arabic Speakers

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