mint

1 of 4

noun (1)

1
: any of a family (Lamiaceae synonym Labiatae, the mint family) of aromatic plants with a square stem and a 4-lobed ovary which produces four one-seeded nutlets in fruit
especially : any of a genus (Mentha) of mints that have white, purple, or pink verticillate flowers with a nearly regular corolla and four equal stamens and that include some used in flavoring and cookery
2
: a confection flavored with mint
minty adjective

mint

2 of 4

noun (2)

1
: a place where coins, medals, or tokens are made
2
: a place where something is manufactured
3
: a vast sum or amount
worth a mint

mint

3 of 4

verb

minted; minting; mints

transitive verb

1
: to make (coins or money) out of metal : coin
2
3
: to cause to attain an indicated status
newly minted doctors
minter noun

mint

4 of 4

adjective

: unmarred as if fresh from a mint
in mint condition

Examples of mint in a Sentence

Verb coins that were minted before 1965 We mint coins out of copper. Adjective a mint baseball card that should be worth a lot to a collector
Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Take your pick from 36 colors and patterns, including black, tie-dye, and mint green. Isabel Garcia, Peoplemag, 16 Feb. 2024 Herbed Sour Cream Blend 1 cup of sour cream with 20-25 fresh mint leaves and two sprigs of dill in a food processor. Claudia Alarcón, Forbes, 15 Feb. 2024 This cake is topped with a heavenly Lemon-Cream Cheese Frosting, pieces of pink gumdrops, and mint leaves. Southern Living Editors, Southern Living, 15 Feb. 2024 Her outfit included a pair of black silk-and-lace boxing shorts and a creamy mint shirt with on-the-top buttons connected à la the Rihanna pregnancy announcement. Margaux Anbouba, Vogue, 10 Feb. 2024 In a small bowl, combine the mint and lemon or lime juice. Kathleen Purvis, Charlotte Observer, 31 Jan. 2024 Lemon Balm Lemon balm, an herb in the mint family, has long been considered to have calming properties. Cristina Mutchler, Health, 28 Jan. 2024 Choose from either lavender or mint versions, and consider gifting it with some homemade hot chocolate mix. Moriah Mason, Southern Living, 1 Feb. 2024 There’s even a special Valentine’s Day cocktail: Strawberry Fields Forever, with vodka, St. Germain, strawberry and mint. Connie Ogle, Miami Herald, 1 Feb. 2024
Verb
Swift, who was first minted a billionaire in October, is worth $1.1 billion, while Peltz holds a $1.5 billion fortune. Derek Saul, Forbes, 14 Feb. 2024 At the end of another aisle was a plastic bag that contained a single subway token minted in the 1990s. Chelsia Rose Marcius Lanna Apisukh, New York Times, 14 Feb. 2024 An extraordinary coin with only 109 minted, epitomizing the elegance and rarity of the era's coinage. Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 6 Feb. 2024 The ancient 3-cent coin was minted in Königsberg, experts told Science in Poland (PAP), according to a Jan. 29 post. Moira Ritter, Miami Herald, 31 Jan. 2024 Lilly now has the highest market capitalization of any biopharma company, having minted money from demand for its obesity and diabetes treatment Mounjaro. Meghana Keshavan, STAT, 22 Jan. 2024 Nirvana’s In Utero and Weezer’s Pinkerton are the canonical ‘90s alt-rock albums on which newly minted rock stars shell-shocked by their sudden multi-platinum fame defiantly made a tougher, uglier record under the pressure to keep the hits coming. Al Shipley, SPIN, 17 Jan. 2024 Some of the 34 bills last year were not controversial, like the one that renamed Veterans Affairs clinics and one that minted a coin commemorating the anniversary of the Marine Corps. Joe Locascio, ABC News, 10 Jan. 2024 Last year, the second largest cryptocurrency Ethereum abandoned the practice in favor of an alternative approach called proof-of-stake, in which users win the right to mint new blocks by putting up large chunks of their holdings as collateral. IEEE Spectrum, 10 Jan. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'mint.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English minte, from Old English, from Latin mentha, menta; akin to Greek minthē mint

Noun (2)

Middle English mynt coin, money, from Old English mynet, from Latin moneta mint, coin, from Moneta, epithet of Juno; from the fact that the Romans coined money in the temple of Juno Moneta

First Known Use

Noun (1)

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Noun (2)

15th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

circa 1520, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1902, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of mint was before the 12th century

Dictionary Entries Near mint

Cite this Entry

“Mint.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mint. Accessed 28 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

mint

1 of 3 noun
1
: any of a family of herbs and shrubs (as basil or catnip) with square stems and opposite leaves
especially : one (as peppermint or spearmint) that is fragrant and is the source of a flavoring oil
2
: a mint-flavored piece of candy

mint

2 of 3 noun
1
: a place where coins, medals, and tokens are made
2
: a great amount
worth a mint

mint

3 of 3 verb
: to make (as coins) out of metal
minter noun
Etymology

Noun

Old English minte "the herb mint," from Latin mentha, menta "mint"

Noun

Middle English mynt "coin, money," from Old English mynet (same meaning), from Latin moneta "coin, place where coins are made," from Moneta "a special name for the goddess Juno"; so called because the ancient Romans made coins at the temple of Juno Moneta — related to money see Word History at money

Medical Definition

mint

noun
: any of a family (Labiatae, the mint family) of aromatic plants with a square stem and a four-lobed ovary which produces four one-seeded nutlets in fruit
especially : any of the genus Mentha

More from Merriam-Webster on mint

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!