lesson

noun
les·​son | \ ˈle-sᵊn How to pronounce lesson (audio) \

Definition of lesson

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a passage from sacred writings read in a service of worship
2a : a piece of instruction
b : a reading or exercise to be studied by a pupil
c : a division of a course of instruction
3a : something learned by study or experience his years of travel had taught him valuable lessons
b : an instructive example the lessons of history

lesson

verb
lessoned; lessoning\ ˈle-​sə-​niŋ How to pronounce lessoning (audio) , ˈles-​niŋ \

Definition of lesson (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to give a lesson to : instruct

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Synonyms for lesson

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Examples of lesson in a Sentence

Noun You can't go out to play until you've finished your lessons. The book is divided into 12 lessons. She took piano lessons for years. political leaders who have failed to learn the lessons of history I've learned my lesson—I'll never do that again! Let that be a lesson to you—if you don't take better care of your toys they'll get broken! Verb would tirelessly lesson the children in proper manners
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The guidelines do not address group activities such as swimming lessons, swim and dive teams and water aerobics. Evan Macdonald, cleveland, "Ohio guidelines for reopening swimming pools include reduced capacity, social distancing in the water," 16 May 2020 This video—a collaboration between Retro Report and Scientific American—lays out some lessons, and perils, of those past desperate quests for immunity in the face of a novel disease. Scientific American, "Why History Urges Caution on Coronavirus Immunity Testing," 14 May 2020 Countries like Italy and Spain have learned the bitter lessons. John Lauerman, Bloomberg.com, "Stay Home During the ‘Crisis of Our Generation’: Coronavirus Q&A," 13 May 2020 This lesson had been driven home again and again by the painful experiences of both British and American formations in the Mediterranean and Normandy. Max Hastings, The New York Review of Books, "Botch on the Rhine," 13 May 2020 While the numbers and challenges are on a different scale in America's current crisis, the US can learn important lessons from solutions deployed in challenging humanitarian environments like refugee camps. Shailee Adinolfi, Wired, "The US Could Deliver Stimulus Checks Faster—With Tech's Help," 12 May 2020 Your first season will teach you many lessons, and so will the ones to come. Morgan Lyle, Field & Stream, "10 Things to Know Before Your First Season of Flyfishing," 11 May 2020 Luke Bryan just learned a valuable lesson about payback from his wife, Caroline Boyer Bryan. Kayla Keegan, Good Housekeeping, "Luke Bryan’s Wife Caroline Got the Country Star Back for His “Mean” Prank in New Instagram," 1 May 2020 Yet, policymakers and pundits too often draw the wrong lesson from World War II: namely, that government can simply order up scientific knowledge and direct it to solve practical problems. Mark P. Mills, National Review, "The Auspicious History — and Future — of Basic Science Research," 29 Apr. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb To lesson their harmful impact on the environment, 35 Starbucks stores began charging customers who use the paper cups on Monday, February 26. Suzannah Weiss, Teen Vogue, "Starbucks Stores in London Test Paper Cup Fee," 27 Feb. 2018 LESSON 3: EMBRACE RIVALRY If competition brings out the best in us, what does rivalry—a sort of turbo-competition—do? Jon Wertheim, SI.com, "Roger Federer LLC: How the G.O.A.T. Got to the Top of His Game, in Businesslike Fashion," 25 Aug. 2017 Lesson five: Find a way to focus on your strengths. Allen Buchanan, Orange County Register, "Six commercial real estate lessons learned in 2016," 7 Jan. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lesson.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lesson

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1555, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for lesson

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French leçon, from Late Latin lection-, lectio, from Latin, act of reading, from legere to read — more at legend

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Time Traveler for lesson

Time Traveler

The first known use of lesson was in the 13th century

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Statistics for lesson

Last Updated

20 May 2020

Cite this Entry

“Lesson.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/lesson. Accessed 1 Jun. 2020.

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More Definitions for lesson

lesson

noun
How to pronounce lesson (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of lesson

: an activity that you do in order to learn something also : something that is taught
: a single class or part of a course of instruction
: something learned through experience

lesson

noun
les·​son | \ ˈle-sᵊn How to pronounce lesson (audio) \

Kids Definition of lesson

1 : something learned or taught Travels to other countries taught him valuable lessons.
2 : a single class or part of a course of instruction music lessons

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More from Merriam-Webster on lesson

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for lesson

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with lesson

Spanish Central: Translation of lesson

Nglish: Translation of lesson for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of lesson for Arabic Speakers

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