lesson

noun
les·​son | \ ˈle-sᵊn How to pronounce lesson (audio) \

Definition of lesson

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a passage from sacred writings read in a service of worship
2a : a piece of instruction
b : a reading or exercise to be studied by a pupil
c : a division of a course of instruction
3a : something learned by study or experience his years of travel had taught him valuable lessons
b : an instructive example the lessons of history
c : reprimand

lesson

verb
lessoned; lessoning\ ˈle-​sə-​niŋ How to pronounce lessoning (audio) , ˈles-​niŋ \

Definition of lesson (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to give a lesson to : instruct

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Synonyms for lesson

Synonyms: Noun

assignment, reading

Synonyms: Verb

educate, indoctrinate, instruct, school, teach, train, tutor

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Examples of lesson in a Sentence

Noun

You can't go out to play until you've finished your lessons. The book is divided into 12 lessons. She took piano lessons for years. political leaders who have failed to learn the lessons of history I've learned my lesson—I'll never do that again! Let that be a lesson to you—if you don't take better care of your toys they'll get broken!

Verb

would tirelessly lesson the children in proper manners
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun

At Southern Spears Surf Shop, visitors can schedule lessons in advance. Houston Chronicle, "Campers can explore the shores, waterways of Galveston Bay," 14 June 2019 For Chad, the recruiting process taught him a large lesson. Ross Dellenger, SI.com, "Chandler Morris's Unconventional Recruitment Ends in Joining Dad at Arkansas," 14 June 2019 There’s a lesson for conservatives in there: Job creation and economic prosperity can sometimes fall very short of solving certain social problems. James Sutton, National Review, "Don’t Blame Big Tech for San Francisco’s Homelessness Crisis," 13 June 2019 Stanley Milgram, a psychologist at Yale University and one of Kassin's heroes, had conducted studies in the 1960s in which subjects were encouraged to give electric shocks to other subjects who were not learning their lessons quickly enough. Douglas Starr, Science | AAAS, "This psychologist explains why people confess to crimes they didn’t commit," 13 June 2019 Many of his career lessons came from his time with San Francisco. Wells Dusenbury, sun-sentinel.com, "‘It’s a game of redemption’ — How Marlins closer Sergio Romo has learned to bounce back from failure," 12 June 2019 Chef Mike Erickson is using barbecue to teach some big life lessons in the small Texas town of Burnet. CBS News, "Varsity barbecue competitions take off in Texas high schools," 8 June 2019 The family takes a vacation to a relative’s farm, where the neurotic city dog Max learns some lessons about tough love and bravery from a gruff cattle dog, Rooster (Harrison Ford). Katie Walsh, Twin Cities, "‘Secret Life of Pets 2’ adds babies and toddlers to lovable animal mix," 6 June 2019 The residents are happy to share their skills and knowledge, including lessons in archery and axe-throwing. Kayleigh Roberts, Marie Claire, "Weekend Trip Guide: Where to Stay, Eat, and Drink in Flåm, Norway," 25 May 2019

Recent Examples on the Web: Verb

To lesson their harmful impact on the environment, 35 Starbucks stores began charging customers who use the paper cups on Monday, February 26. Suzannah Weiss, Teen Vogue, "Starbucks Stores in London Test Paper Cup Fee," 27 Feb. 2018 LESSON 3: EMBRACE RIVALRY If competition brings out the best in us, what does rivalry—a sort of turbo-competition—do? Jon Wertheim, SI.com, "Roger Federer LLC: How the G.O.A.T. Got to the Top of His Game, in Businesslike Fashion," 25 Aug. 2017 Lesson five: Find a way to focus on your strengths. Allen Buchanan, Orange County Register, "Six commercial real estate lessons learned in 2016," 7 Jan. 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'lesson.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of lesson

Noun

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1555, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for lesson

Noun

Middle English, from Anglo-French leçon, from Late Latin lection-, lectio, from Latin, act of reading, from legere to read — more at legend

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Learn More about lesson

Statistics for lesson

Last Updated

18 Jun 2019

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Time Traveler for lesson

The first known use of lesson was in the 13th century

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More Definitions for lesson

lesson

noun

English Language Learners Definition of lesson

: an activity that you do in order to learn something also : something that is taught
: a single class or part of a course of instruction
: something learned through experience

lesson

noun
les·​son | \ ˈle-sᵊn How to pronounce lesson (audio) \

Kids Definition of lesson

1 : something learned or taught Travels to other countries taught him valuable lessons.
2 : a single class or part of a course of instruction music lessons

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More from Merriam-Webster on lesson

Rhyming Dictionary: Words that rhyme with lesson

Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for lesson

Spanish Central: Translation of lesson

Nglish: Translation of lesson for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of lesson for Arabic Speakers

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