jab

verb
\ ˈjab How to pronounce jab (audio) \
jabbed; jabbing

Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

transitive verb

1a : to pierce with or as if with a sharp object : stab
b : to poke quickly or abruptly : thrust
2 : to strike with a short straight blow
3 : to pointedly tease or mock (someone) We joke around. … I was jabbing him about injuries he's had.Sports Illustrated

intransitive verb

1 : to make quick or abrupt thrusts with a sharp object
2 : to strike a person with a short straight blow
3 : to pointedly tease, mock, or make fun of someone At a moment's notice, he can produce a months-old editorial cartoon jabbing at him and seems genuinely hurt by the message.The New York Times

jab

noun

Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : an act of jabbing especially : a short straight boxing punch delivered with the leading hand
2 : a pointed and often mocking comment or criticism He has a lot of fun with Ranovic, the oh-so-dramatic, eager young undercover cop who consistently fails to understand Salter's ironic jabs.— Jean MacFarlane Wright Undeterred, McCain continues with his standard stump speech, leaving in all the anti-Bush jabs.— Michelle Cottle

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Examples of jab in a Sentence

Verb He jabbed at the other player with his hockey stick. The needle jabbed his arm. The needle jabbed into his arm. Noun She gave him a jab in the ribs. He threw a right jab to his opponent's body.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb The McConnell spot also jabbed at McGrath, but in that instance Kentucky's Democratic governor did not speak out against the use of his image in the advertisement. Phillip M. Bailey, The Courier-Journal, "Amy McGrath 'strongly' stands by ad despite Republican governors' objections," 16 May 2020 President Donald Trump, once friendly with Stephenson, wasted no time jabbing him over his departure. NBC News, "AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson to step down," 24 Apr. 2020 McConnell has eagerly jabbed at Democrats over the issue in the past several weeks. Phillip M. Bailey, The Courier-Journal, "Joe Biden's sexual assault allegation puts Senate candidate Amy McGrath in a tough spot," 8 May 2020 Reid jabbed Sanders’s healthcare plan but refused to give his endorsement to any of the candidates ahead of Nevada’s caucuses on Saturday. Madison Dibble, Washington Examiner, "Harry Reid on Medicare for All: ‘Not a chance in hell it would pass’," 19 Feb. 2020 The suspect appeared to wield at least one sharp object and attempted to jab the man with it several times. Fox News, "UK man, 77, ‘bravely’ fights off ATM mugger in boxing match caught on video," 20 Feb. 2020 After Biden took a jab at Steyer, a former hedge fund manager, for investing in a private prison company, Steyer jabbed back at Biden for writing a crime bill that Steyer said led to mass incarceration of black and Latino men. USA TODAY, "Democratic debate FactCheck: Bloomberg misleads on tax returns, Biden flubs gun violence stat," 26 Feb. 2020 Fewer people dotting the surrounding neighborhood slumping against walls, jabbing needles into their necks and discarding dirty syringes on the sidewalks. Heather Knight, SFChronicle.com, "Bold SF drug-injection site plan faces just one big hurdle: Trump," 26 Oct. 2019 But to get jabbed by the president of a mediocre Pac-12 school that isn’t even on the Wolverines level in terms of talent, wins, NFL players or any other standard of measurement over the past five years, is ridiculous. Jeremy Cluff, azcentral, "ASU president Michael Crow ripped for apparently ripping Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh," 17 Feb. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun On Monday, the hesitancy that so many people feel about the vaccine pushed President Joe Biden to plead with Americans to get the jab. Mark Nichols, ABC News, "3 things scientists have learned about vaccine hesitancy: Analysis," 20 Apr. 2021 While several cruise lines have pledged to require passengers to be vaccinated before boarding (and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends it), MSC will not require guests get the jab. Alison Fox, Travel + Leisure, "MSC Cruises Will Sail to Italy, the UK, and Beyond This Summer," 16 Apr. 2021 Touting benefits like these could maybe even encourage some vaccine holdouts to get the jab. Star Tribune, "Readers Write: Public transit and Hennepin Avenue, Daunte Wright's death, COVID vaccines," 14 Apr. 2021 Illinois residents over the age of 16, except those in Chicago, are eligible on April 12, while those in the Windy City can get a jab starting April 19. Kaelan Deese, Washington Examiner, "Teachers union requests one-week delay in Chicago high school reopenings," 7 Apr. 2021 In a postgame interview with TNT, Rapaport took a jab at Durant’s demeanor. oregonlive, "Kevin Durant, Michael Rapaport get into nasty social media exchange, and both should be embarrassed (commentary)," 31 Mar. 2021 The same was true of black and Hispanic Americans last year, but robust outreach by the White House means ethnic and racial minorities are now as likely as white Americans to get the jab. Katherine Doyle, Washington Examiner, "White House eyes conservatives in next stage of vaccine push," 27 Mar. 2021 On April 1, India will expand eligibility and allow anyone 45 or older to get a jab. New York Times, "India Cuts Back on Vaccine Exports as Infections Surge at Home," 25 Mar. 2021 Meanwhile, Portugal has presented a tough stance in response to anticipated reluctance to have the AstraZeneca jab. Laura Smith-spark, CNN, "Europe's vaccine rollout needs AstraZeneca -- but public confidence is dented," 20 Mar. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'jab.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of jab

Verb

1827, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1a

Noun

1872, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for jab

Verb

alteration of job to strike

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Learn More about jab

Statistics for jab

Cite this Entry

“Jab.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jab. Accessed 7 May. 2021.

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More Definitions for jab

jab

verb

English Language Learners Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to push something sharp or hard quickly or suddenly into or toward someone or something
: to be pushed quickly and suddenly into someone or a part of someone's body

jab

noun

English Language Learners Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick or sudden hit with something sharp or hard
boxing : a short, straight punch
British, informal : an injection of something (such as medicine) into your body with a needle

jab

verb
\ ˈjab How to pronounce jab (audio) \
jabbed; jabbing

Kids Definition of jab

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to poke quickly or suddenly with or as if with something sharp He jabbed me with a stick.

jab

noun

Kids Definition of jab (Entry 2 of 2)

: a quick or sudden poke

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Comments on jab

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