harm

noun
\ ˈhärm How to pronounce harm (audio) \

Definition of harm

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : physical or mental damage : injury the amount of harm sustained by the boat during the storm
2 : mischief, hurt I meant you no harm.

harm

verb
harmed; harming; harms

Definition of harm (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to damage or injure physically or mentally : to cause harm (see harm entry 1) to No animals were harmed in the making of the film. the national interest … was gravely harmed by this attack— Elmer Davis

Other Words from harm

Verb

harmer noun

Synonyms for harm

Synonyms: Noun

Synonyms: Verb

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Choose the Right Synonym for harm

Verb

injure, harm, hurt, damage, impair, mar mean to affect injuriously. injure implies the inflicting of anything detrimental to one's looks, comfort, health, or success. badly injured in an accident harm often stresses the inflicting of pain, suffering, or loss. careful not to harm the animals hurt implies inflicting a wound to the body or to the feelings. hurt by their callous remarks damage suggests injury that lowers value or impairs usefulness. a table damaged in shipping impair suggests a making less complete or efficient by deterioration or diminution. years of smoking had impaired his health mar applies to injury that spoils perfection (as of a surface) or causes disfigurement. the text is marred by many typos

Examples of harm in a Sentence

Noun They threatened him with bodily harm. The scandal has done irreparable harm to his reputation. She'll do anything to protect her children from harm. They have suffered serious physical harm. These new regulations could cause lasting harm to small businesses. Verb He would never intentionally harm his children. chemicals that could harm the environment The scandal has seriously harmed his reputation.
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun And harm-reduction programs such as safe-consumption sites, where people can use drugs under supervision and receive referrals to treatment, help make opioid use safer. Abdullah Shihipar, The Atlantic, 14 Jan. 2022 In one example cited by Gloria, the city recently opened a harm-reduction shelter on Sports Arena Boulevard specifically for homeless people who are struggling with addictions or severe mental illness. Gary Warth, San Diego Union-Tribune, 12 Jan. 2022 While attitudes have been shifting slowly, many states are intensely resistant to harm-reduction strategies, balking at the idea of needle exchanges. Molly Osberg, The New Republic, 5 Jan. 2022 The group hands out care packages and drug harm-reduction kits containing hygiene products, needle-cleaning kits, water, snacks, wipes, condoms and information. Anjanette Delgado, Freep.com, 2 Jan. 2022 To his credit, Becerra attempted to express support for harm reduction via safe consumption sites. David Introcaso, STAT, 30 Dec. 2021 To keep us out of harm’s way, negative events grab more of our mind’s attention than positive ones. Bryan Robinson, Forbes, 1 Jan. 2022 If a drug has little potential for benefit, then even a small risk of harm leads to the drug being worse than useless. Dr. Keith Roach, oregonlive, 29 Dec. 2021 The Bucs creatively ran the football for 5.1 yards per carry and kept Brady out of harm’s way. Adam Burke Vsin, Los Angeles Times, 27 Dec. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb These laws will disproportionately harm low-income Americans, communities of color, individuals with disabilities, and other historically disenfranchised groups. Angus King, Time, 14 Jan. 2022 Regardless of the stewards’ determination, Defendants have still harmed the plaintiffs and will continue to harm individuals through Baffert’s racketeering scheme. Tim Sullivan, The Courier-Journal, 13 Jan. 2022 But an Olympic boycott, as with boycotts past, will only harm the athletes and prove as effective as the Athenian boycott in support of Callippus. Robert Gehrke, The Salt Lake Tribune, 12 Jan. 2022 Surrounding yourself with others who aren’t making companionable and supportive choices could definitely harm your shot at success. Wayne And Wanda, Anchorage Daily News, 9 Jan. 2022 Some doctors say boarding, while not ideal, does not harm patients. Lisa Schencker, chicagotribune.com, 7 Jan. 2022 This is a critical issue since rushing approvals of tests or allowing those with deficiencies to get into the system could harm the credibility of testing more broadly -- and be a net negative in the drive to end the pandemic. Stephen Collinson, CNN, 28 Dec. 2021 While growth is likely, change in current market sentiment can harm the near-term outlook. Trefis Team, Forbes, 27 Dec. 2021 Here’s why: Cleaning products, such as bleach, can harm gold, diamonds and pearls. Washington Post, 23 Dec. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'harm.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of harm

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for harm

Noun and Verb

Middle English, from Old English hearm; akin to Old High German harm injury, Old Church Slavonic sramŭ shame

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Time Traveler for harm

Time Traveler

The first known use of harm was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near harm

harls

harm

harm's way

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Statistics for harm

Last Updated

18 Jan 2022

Cite this Entry

“Harm.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/harm. Accessed 24 Jan. 2022.

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More Definitions for harm

harm

noun

English Language Learners Definition of harm

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: physical or mental damage or injury : something that causes someone or something to be hurt, broken, made less valuable or successful, etc.

harm

verb

English Language Learners Definition of harm (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause hurt, injury, or damage to (someone or something) : to cause harm to (someone or something)

harm

noun
\ ˈhärm How to pronounce harm (audio) \

Kids Definition of harm

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: physical or mental damage : injury The storm did little harm to the sheltered beach.

harm

verb
harmed; harming

Kids Definition of harm (Entry 2 of 2)

: to cause hurt, injury, or damage to insects that harm trees

Choose the Right Synonym for harm

Noun

harm, injury, and damage mean an act that causes loss or pain. harm can be used of anything that causes suffering or loss. The frost did great harm to the crops. injury is likely to be used of something that has as a result the loss of health or success. She suffered an injury to the eyes. damage stresses the idea of loss (as of value or fitness). The fire caused much damage to the furniture.

harm

noun

Legal Definition of harm

: loss of or damage to a person's right, property, or physical or mental well-being : injury

Other Words from harm

harm transitive verb

More from Merriam-Webster on harm

Nglish: Translation of harm for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of harm for Arabic Speakers

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