gut

noun
\ ˈgət How to pronounce gut (audio) \

Definition of gut

 (Entry 1 of 4)

1a : bowels, entrails usually used in plural fish guts
b : digestive tract also : part of the digestive tract and especially the intestine or stomach
c : belly, abdomen
d : catgut
2 guts plural : the inner essential parts the guts of a car
3 guts plural : fortitude and stamina in coping with what alarms, repels, or discourages : courage, pluck had the guts to run for public office
4 : the basic visceral, emotional, or instinctual part of a person She knew in her gut that he was lying. Consult more than one financial adviser before making a final choice, and trust your gut.— Quentin Fottrell My gut says this is, overall, a terrible idea.— Erica Buist often used before another noun making a gut decisiona gut feeling"Tony's a very driven guy, and he makes a lot of decisions based on gut instinct," …— Tom Nides
5 : a narrow passage also : a narrow waterway or small creek
6 : the sac of silk taken from a silkworm ready to spin its cocoon and drawn out into a thread for use as a snell

gut

adjective

Definition of gut (Entry 2 of 4)

1 : arising from one's inmost self : visceral a gut reaction
2 : having strong impact or immediate relevance gut issues

gut

verb
gutted; gutting

Definition of gut (Entry 3 of 4)

transitive verb

1a : eviscerate
b : to extract all the essential passages or portions from
2a : to destroy the inside of fire gutted the building
b : to destroy the essential power or effectiveness of inflation gutting the economy
gut it out

Definition of GUT (Entry 4 of 4)

grand unified theory; grand unification theory

Examples of gut in a Sentence

Noun the guts of the fish the guts of a machine the guts of a business deal That decision took a lot of guts. I didn't have the guts to do it. Verb The salmon is already gutted and filleted. Critics claim that these reforms will gut the law. See More
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun There is no mythical antecedent to David smugly carrying his beer gut like a womb. New York Times, 5 Aug. 2022 One, researchers said, was meat’s effect on the gut microbiome. Martin Finucane, BostonGlobe.com, 4 Aug. 2022 Use body-mind-soul (or head-heart-gut) awareness to guide decision-making and value creation. Albana Vrioni, Forbes, 1 Aug. 2022 But the lab work is not just for the sake of data: FitBiomics debuted Nella, a probiotic supplement for gut and digestive health, last year. Jamie Rosen, Robb Report, 31 July 2022 One cup of sweet corn provides almost 5 grams of fiber for a healthy gut and heart while reducing the risk of cancer. Bethany Thayer, Detroit Free Press, 30 July 2022 Handling soil, which contains microbes, can promote microbiome diversity in your home, which could benefit gut and skin health. Erica Sweeney, Good Housekeeping, 29 July 2022 Built in 2002, but recently gut-renovated, the two-story smart home has eight bedrooms and a total of 10 bathrooms. Robyn A. Friedman, Sun Sentinel, 28 July 2022 If any history was lost in its gut renovation, Hannes Peer’s redesign imbued it with a whole new sense of place. Rachel Silva, ELLE Decor, 28 July 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective After the larvae fed on the bait, the essential oils inside caused neurotoxicity and mid-gut and tracheal damage, among other morphological changes not yet recorded in literature in larvae belonging to the Aedes mosquitospecies. Elizabeth Gamillo, Smithsonian Magazine, 5 May 2022 In one of the studies, Nagler and coworkers collected gut bacteria from the feces of healthy and milk-allergic babies and put those collections of microbes into the digestive tracts of germ-free mice. Esther Landhuis, Scientific American, 23 May 2020 Some of this was simply a gut public-health reaction to the sudden spread of the virus. Ned Temko, The Christian Science Monitor, 15 Apr. 2020 But as their descriptions continue into more specific and graphic territory, that veneer quickly dissolves into unmistakable, gut-wrenching exploitation. Andrew Unterberger, Billboard, 4 Mar. 2019 The researchers hope to better understand how gut bacteria protect their insect hosts. Popular Science, 5 Feb. 2020 Still, Hollywood fancies itself as a town that operates on gut instinct rather than algorithms, for better or for worse. Tatiana Siegel, The Hollywood Reporter, 8 Jan. 2020 Priorities can then be set on a sounder basis than gut instinct, sentimental appeal or the political clout of the people hurt or helped. The Economist, 16 Nov. 2019 That Hood was the latest Moda Center target, however, was especially gut-wrenching. oregonlive, 7 Dec. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Blueberries contribute antioxidant properties, while sweet potato helps maintain vision and gut health. The Salt Lake Tribune, 24 June 2022 By investing in these two areas, organizations can make better decisions that are based on data rather than gut instinct. Tal Daskal, Forbes, 20 May 2022 The blood levels of BCAAs depend on individuals' diet, genes and gut microbiome. Lisa Drayer, CNN, 27 Mar. 2022 The irony of this moment is that Republicans have been working at the state and federal levels to restrict Medicaid, if not gut it entirely, since it was created as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Abdul El-sayed, The New Republic, 7 July 2022 Given that electricity generation is the key contributor (either directly or via the electrification of the automobile industry) to U.S. carbon emissions, did the Court basically gut US climate mitigation efforts? Nives Dolsak And Aseem Prakash, Forbes, 4 July 2022 Such a move would not only gut the Pac-12, but make the Big Ten a 16-team super conference that stretches from coast-to-coast. Creg Stephenson | Cstephenson@al.com, al, 30 June 2022 This can gut demand if wealthier collectors at auction pivot to other artists. Kelly Crow, WSJ, 18 June 2022 This will gut communities that are in desperate need of more economic development, not less. The Editorial Board, Chicago Tribune, 2 June 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gut.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of gut

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a(1)

Adjective

1964, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for gut

Noun, Adjective, and Verb

Middle English, from Old English guttas, plural; probably akin to Old English gēotan to pour

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Time Traveler for gut

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The first known use of gut was before the 12th century

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Dictionary Entries Near gut

gust tunnel

gut

GUT

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Statistics for gut

Last Updated

9 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Gut.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gut. Accessed 10 Aug. 2022.

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More Definitions for gut

gut

noun
\ ˈgət How to pronounce gut (audio) \

Kids Definition of gut

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the inner parts of an animal a frog's guts
2 : a person's stomach : belly He flattened his back against the wall and pulled in his gut.— Lynne Rae Perkins, Nuts to You
3 : the digestive tract or a part of it (as the intestine)
4 : the inner parts the guts of the machine
5 : catgut
6 guts plural : courage

gut

verb
gutted; gutting

Kids Definition of gut (Entry 2 of 2)

1 : to remove the inner organs from gut a fish
2 : to destroy the inside of Fire gutted the building.

gut

noun
\ ˈgət How to pronounce gut (audio) \

Medical Definition of gut

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : digestive tract also : part of the digestive tract and especially the intestine or stomach the mix of bacteria making up the flora of the gut — W. E. Leary
b : abdomen sense 1a, belly usually used in plural not often in formal use his huge gut hung far below his belt— L. M. Uris
2 : catgut

gut

transitive verb
gutted; gutting

Medical Definition of gut (Entry 2 of 2)

: to take out the bowels of : eviscerate

More from Merriam-Webster on gut

Nglish: Translation of gut for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of gut for Arabic Speakers

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