gaze

verb
\ ˈgāz How to pronounce gaze (audio) \
gazed; gazing

Definition of gaze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

intransitive verb

: to fix the eyes in a steady intent look often with eagerness or studious attention gazed out the window at the snow

gaze

noun

Definition of gaze (Entry 2 of 2)

: a fixed intent look

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Other Words from gaze

Verb

gazer noun

Synonyms for gaze

Synonyms: Verb

Synonyms: Noun

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Examples of gaze in a Sentence

Verb He gazed out the window at the snow. She gazed intently into his eyes. Noun She looked at him with a calm, steady gaze. suddenly aware of her admiring gaze, he became self-conscious and uncomfortable
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Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Her famous turquoise eyes, painted in 1928 on the ceiling of the portico, still gaze down, unblinking, at all who pass beneath. Moira Hodgson, WSJ, "‘The Sphinx’ Review: The Riddle in Her Eyes," 20 Dec. 2020 Rather than simply displaying African objects for museumgoers to gaze at, some have suggested rethinking the museum experience altogether. Jacob Kushner, History & Culture, "In Germany, a new museum stirs up a colonial controversy," 16 Dec. 2020 To see through the whirlpool of stars, the two teams used the world’s largest telescopes and their own pioneering technologies to gaze through the space dust. Rasha Aridi, Smithsonian Magazine, "Three Scientists Awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for Discovering Black Holes," 6 Oct. 2020 The inability to have people use it to gaze at the skies and learn more about astronomy has been frustrating, planetarium director Stephanie Rybka said. Rafael Guerrero, chicagotribune.com, "Waubonsie Valley planetarium celebrates its 45th year with virtual field trips and programming," 24 Dec. 2020 Plus, few tourists flock to DC to gaze at the Lego-like Brutalist FBI building. Stephen Collinson, CNN, "The momentum behind Biden's climate ambitions," 22 Dec. 2020 To gaze out at the sheets of ice in winter, stretching toward an infinite horizon, is to take in the awe of nature itself. Star Tribune, "Here’s what you need to know to ski safely this season despite the coronavirus pandemic.," 5 Dec. 2020 Almost 70 gingerbread houses will be on display in storefront windows, and visitors will be able to gaze upon the creations while practicing social distancing and safe COVID-19 precautions. courant.com, "Community News For The South Windsor Edition," 25 Nov. 2020 For all society’s talk of love and nurturance, under Keiko’s gaze its core value is revealed to be a cheery willingness to serve others 24 hours a day. Stephanie Hayes, The Atlantic, "Sayaka Murata Is Experimenting on You," 9 Nov. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun His head turning through shadow and his narrow, expressionless gaze combine steady vigilance with the quality of a knowing glance, conveying a powerful sense of interiority. Washington Post, "A masterpiece with a complicated afterlife," 30 Dec. 2020 In recent decades, dreams have come under the gaze of neuroscientists as one of the field’s central unsolved mysteries. David Eagleman, Time, "Why Do We Dream? A New Theory on How It Protects Our Brains," 29 Dec. 2020 But too many people knew John le Carré there, spotted his upright stance and far-sighted gaze, the fine greying head, and might start conversations. The Economist, "The watchful scribbler John le Carré died on December 12th," 14 Dec. 2020 At times her gaze, a sharp rebuke to anyone who would attempt to tame or control her, can’t help but feel like directed at the movie itself. Justin Chang Film Critic, Los Angeles Times, "Review: ‘News of the World,’ Paul Greengrass’ odd-couple western, is an admirable but bumpy ride," 11 Dec. 2020 Similarly, the series will explore the white gaze via Starling's FBI colleague Ardelia Mapp. James Hibberd, EW.com, "Clarice producers break silence on Lambs sequel with 5 major revelations," 17 Dec. 2020 Turning his gaze to God was Reagan’s own, personal way, coming from his heart. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, National Review, "An Encounter Sabotaged," 17 Nov. 2020 Woke up one night in the Suburban on the shoulder of the road in the middle of nowhere, headlights and a bleary gaze fixed on the driver, dancing in circles, trying to stay awake. Kevin Sherrington, Dallas News, "Much has changed since National Finals Rodeo set its roots in Texas. Now that it’s back, some want to see a permanent return," 3 Dec. 2020 At the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue, the White House gleamed bright, behind black metal fencing and cement barriers and metal bars and the watchful gaze of Secret Service officers. Robin Givhan, Washington Post, "Waiting for relief," 4 Nov. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'gaze.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of gaze

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun

1566, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for gaze

Verb

Middle English

Noun

derivative of gaze entry 1

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Time Traveler for gaze

Time Traveler

The first known use of gaze was in the 14th century

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Statistics for gaze

Last Updated

15 Jan 2021

Cite this Entry

“Gaze.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/gaze. Accessed 19 Jan. 2021.

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More Definitions for gaze

gaze

verb
How to pronounce gaze (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of gaze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to look at someone or something in a steady way and usually for a long time

gaze

noun

English Language Learners Definition of gaze (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long and steady look

gaze

verb
\ ˈgāz How to pronounce gaze (audio) \
gazed; gazing

Kids Definition of gaze

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: to fix the eyes in a long steady look She gazed at the stars.

gaze

noun

Kids Definition of gaze (Entry 2 of 2)

: a long steady look

Choose the Right Synonym for gaze

Verb

gaze, stare, and glare mean to look at with concentration. gaze is used of a long and fixed look. They stood gazing at the sunset. stare is used of an often curious, rude, or absentminded gaze with eyes wide open. He stared in surprise at the strange creature. glare means an angry stare. The teacher glared at the naughty children.

\ ˈgāz How to pronounce gaze (audio) \
gazed; gazing

Medical Definition of gaze

: to fix the eyes in a steady and intent look

Other Words from gaze

gaze noun

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Comments on gaze

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