flock

1 of 4

noun (1)

1
: a group of animals (such as birds or sheep) assembled or herded together
2
: a group under the guidance of a leader
especially : a church congregation
3
: a large number
a flock of tourists

flock

2 of 4

verb (1)

flocked; flocking; flocks

intransitive verb

: to gather or move in a flock
they flocked to the beach

flock

3 of 4

noun (2)

1
: a tuft of wool or cotton fiber
2
: woolen or cotton refuse used for stuffing furniture and mattresses
3
: very short or pulverized fiber used especially to form a velvety pattern on cloth or paper or a protective covering on metal
4
: floc

flock

4 of 4

verb (2)

flocked; flocking; flocks

transitive verb

1
: to fill with flock
2
: to decorate with flock

Examples of flock in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web
Noun
Whenever the disease is found the entire flock is slaughtered to help limit the spread of the virus. Terry Chea, Fortune, 27 Jan. 2024 This time, rather than keeping them separate, zookeepers have decided to muffle the swearing by placing them with a larger flock. Sarah Kuta, Smithsonian Magazine, 26 Jan. 2024 Every year, thousands of bankers, venture capitalists, private equity investors and other moneybags flock to San Francisco's Union Square to pursue deals. Molly Castle Work and Arthur Allen, CBS News, 23 Jan. 2024 That said, our hunch is both programs will do the majority of their roster reloading in the spring, because a new flock of players will have entered in the April window. Jon Wilner, The Mercury News, 19 Jan. 2024 For instance, on third down early in the second quarter, Patrick Mahomes dropped back, scrambled around through a flock of Ravens defenders, then — as he was being bent in half by a hit to his waist — tossed an end-over-end pass toward his tight end. Houston Mitchell, Los Angeles Times, 29 Jan. 2024 Food and Drinks Visitors and Orlando locals alike flock to the hotel’s signature restaurant, Bull & Bear. Elizabeth Rhodes, Travel + Leisure, 28 Jan. 2024 The gate is once again open, and a fresh flock of hopeful migrants is once again passing through, to the relief of many locals. Elian Peltier Carmen Abd Ali, New York Times, 23 Jan. 2024 And a flock of seagulls is wonderful for the evocative simplicity of the birds’ construction (the little wire that makes each one able to turn its head is the kind of tiny, extra-thoughtful touch that appears throughout the show). Sara Holdren, Vulture, 17 Jan. 2024
Verb
Many Millennials, in their prime family-rearing years, are flocking toward rentals. Michael Lucarelli, Forbes, 14 Feb. 2024 But since the Love Bank opened five years ago, tens of thousands have flocked to Banska Stiavnica to reaffirm their devotion in that picaresque town, which was founded in the 13th century and is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Sam Roberts, New York Times, 12 Feb. 2024 But as more and more restaurants are calling this area home, visitors have flocked to the Seaport for a wide range of cuisines. Maya Kachroo-Levine, Travel + Leisure, 12 Feb. 2024 All the while, climate change is drying out many of the places people are flocking to, like the southwestern US. Matt Simon, WIRED, 12 Feb. 2024 All people of New Orleans, no matter their religion or skin color, would flock to her gumbo pot en masse. Leah Chase, Southern Living, 12 Feb. 2024 Thousands of shoppers have also been flocking to the Grande Cosmetics GrandeLASH-MD Lash Enhancing Serum to make their lashes fuller and longer. Amy Schulman, Peoplemag, 10 Feb. 2024 Tens of thousands of Chinese people have flocked to a social media account of the US Embassy in Beijing to vent their anger and frustration about the stock market, after other outlets of protest had been closed off. Laura He, CNN, 7 Feb. 2024 The pandemic prompted wealthy financiers to flock here for the low taxes and good weather. Michael Smith, Fortune, 3 Feb. 2024 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'flock.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Noun (1)

Middle English, from Old English flocc crowd, band; akin to Old Norse flokkr crowd, band

Noun (2)

Middle English flok, from Anglo-French, from Latin floccus

First Known Use

Noun (1)

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (1)

14th century, in the meaning defined above

Noun (2)

13th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb (2)

1530, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Time Traveler
The first known use of flock was in the 13th century

Dictionary Entries Near flock

Cite this Entry

“Flock.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/flock. Accessed 25 Feb. 2024.

Kids Definition

flock

1 of 2 noun
1
: a group of animals (as birds or sheep) assembled or herded together
2
: a group someone keeps watch over
3
: a large number
a flock of tourists

flock

2 of 2 verb
: to gather or move in a crowd
they flocked to the beach

More from Merriam-Webster on flock

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