chalk

noun
\ ˈchȯk How to pronounce chalk (audio) \

Definition of chalk

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : a soft white, gray, or buff limestone composed chiefly of the shells of foraminifers
b : a prepared form of chalk or a material resembling chalk especially when used (as for writing on blackboards) as a crayon
2a : a mark made with chalk
b British : a point scored in a game

chalk

verb
chalked; chalking; chalks

Definition of chalk (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

1 : to write or draw with chalk
2 : to rub or mark with chalk
3a : to delineate roughly : sketch
b : to set down or add up with or as if with chalk : record usually used with up chalk up the totals

intransitive verb

: to become chalky the paint had begun to chalk

Other Words from chalk

Noun

chalky \ ˈchȯ-​kē How to pronounce chalk (audio) \ adjective

Examples of chalk in a Sentence

Noun The teacher handed her a piece of chalk and asked her to write the answer on the chalkboard. He put chalk marks on the stage to show the actors where they should stand. They drew pictures on the sidewalk with colored chalks. Verb She chalked a message on the side of the barn. He chalked the stage to show the actors where they should stand.
Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The sound of chalk on a chalkboard is pretty darn bad, too. Olivia Muenter, Woman's Day, 8 June 2022 He wasn’t done defensively, diving across the chalk of the right field line to grab Jake Burger’s fly in the eighth. Nathan Ruiz, Baltimore Sun, 23 June 2022 Get out the sidewalk chalk, but not just to draw with. Amy Schwabe, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 26 May 2021 People were skateboarding and kids were drawing with chalk on the street. Steve Smith, Hartford Courant, 1 June 2022 That show, which was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play in 2018, is structured like a classroom lecture, complete with chalk and blackboard. Christopher Arnott, Hartford Courant, 13 June 2022 Tia also shared a video of Darlene helping Cairo open her Easter basket, which included sidewalk chalk and bubbles. Hattie Lindert, PEOPLE.com, 18 Apr. 2022 Cracks and other features were marked by clouds of white chalk where the climbers had grabbed hold. Robert O'harrow Jr., Washington Post, 3 June 2022 In contrast to the vast downtown mothership, the West Hartford branch is cozy and convivial, a stylish room where a blackboard lists bar specials in multicolored chalk. Rand Richards Cooper, Hartford Courant, 2 May 2022 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Big business and government organizations can insist on returning to in-person and chalk any losses up to the Great Resignation. Edward Tuorinsky, Forbes, 1 Aug. 2022 Turn your too-sunny deck or patio into a shady retreat with Peaceful Patios' attached vinyl pergola that won't fade or chalk. Samantha S. Thorpe, Better Homes & Gardens, 29 July 2022 Apple would later reverse that decision and chalk it up to a misunderstanding. Kyle Orland, Ars Technica, 13 July 2022 Nonetheless, there are signs throughout the city of small steps forward: chalk messages of #HPStrong on sidewalks, makeshift memorials, and scores of water bottles, coffee and treats for police manning the crime scene. Taylor Glascock And Kristan Lieb For Cnn, CNN, 11 July 2022 If Levin prevails, J Street will chalk it up as a major win. Daniel Strauss, The New Republic, 19 Apr. 2022 So chalk this recent run up to bad luck, bad timing, and finding a bad person. Wayne And Wanda, Anchorage Daily News, 12 June 2022 My instinct, though, is not to decry those differences as evidence of inauthenticity, but rather to chalk them up to a different cultural reality. New York Times, 6 May 2022 But to chalk all this anxiety up to Musk in particular, and to his loose-cannon persona, is to miss the bigger picture. Samanth Subramanian, Quartz, 26 Apr. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'chalk.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of chalk

Noun

before the 12th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

1580, in the meaning defined at transitive sense 1

History and Etymology for chalk

Noun

Middle English, from Old English cealc, from Latin calc-, calx lime; akin to Greek chalix pebble

Learn More About chalk

Time Traveler for chalk

Time Traveler

The first known use of chalk was before the 12th century

See more words from the same century

Dictionary Entries Near chalk

Chalina

chalk

chalk blue

See More Nearby Entries 

Statistics for chalk

Last Updated

10 Aug 2022

Cite this Entry

“Chalk.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/chalk. Accessed 18 Aug. 2022.

Style: MLA
MLACheck Mark Icon ChicagoCheck Mark Icon APACheck Mark Icon Merriam-WebsterCheck Mark Icon

More Definitions for chalk

chalk

noun
\ ˈchȯk How to pronounce chalk (audio) \

Kids Definition of chalk

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : a soft white, gray, or buff limestone made up mainly of the shells of tiny saltwater animals
2 : a material like chalk especially when used for writing or drawing

chalk

verb
chalked; chalking

Kids Definition of chalk (Entry 2 of 2)

: to rub, mark, write, or draw with chalk
chalk up
1 : to attribute to a supposed cause or source Her mistakes can be chalked up to inexperience.
2 : to earn or achieve The business chalked up large profits.

chalk

noun
\ ˈchȯk How to pronounce chalk (audio) \

Medical Definition of chalk

: a soft white, gray, or buff limestone composed chiefly of the shells of foraminifers and sometimes used medicinally as a source of calcium carbonate

called also creta

— see precipitated chalk, prepared chalk

Other Words from chalk

chalky \ ˈchȯ-​kē How to pronounce chalk (audio) \ adjective

More from Merriam-Webster on chalk

Nglish: Translation of chalk for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of chalk for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about chalk

WORD OF THE DAY

Test Your Vocabulary

The Great British Vocabulary Quiz

  • union jack speech bubble
  • Named after Sir Robert Peel, what are British police called?
How Strong Is Your Vocabulary?

Test your vocabulary with our 10-question quiz!

TAKE THE QUIZ
Universal Daily Crossword

A daily challenge for crossword fanatics.

TAKE THE QUIZ
Love words? Need even more definitions?

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!