extractive

adjective
ex·​trac·​tive | \ ik-ˈstrak-tiv How to pronounce extractive (audio) , ˈek-ˌstrak- \

Definition of extractive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : of, relating to, or involving extraction
b : tending toward or resulting in withdrawal of natural resources by extraction with no provision for replenishment extractive agriculture
2 : capable of being extracted

extractive

noun

Definition of extractive (Entry 2 of 2)

: something extracted or extractable : extract

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Other Words from extractive

Adjective

extractively adverb

Examples of extractive in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Talking about extraction in this context, then, means that one possible future might be one that’s less extractive, more equitable for all parties. Soleil Ho, San Francisco Chronicle, 13 May 2021 The Trump administration often chose to block such growth in favor of groveling to extractive industry. Nick Martin, The New Republic, 7 May 2021 Coal producers too would be denied use of the percentage-depletion allowance, even as it is allowed for all other extractive industries. Benjamin Zycher, National Review, 21 May 2021 Emerging nations require a steady inflow of U.S. dollars to keep extractive industries running. Marin Katusa, Forbes, 20 May 2021 But the processes required in mining for those minerals are negatively impactful to the environment, as all extractive industries invariably are, and thus likely to become points of public controversy. David Blackmon, Forbes, 26 Apr. 2021 In practice that means any new extractive activities are banned, including drilling, mining, logging and grazing. The Economist, 7 Apr. 2021 The PRO Act would level the playing field for such things to happen around the country, helping snuff out anti-labor practices in right-to-work states that lead to rampant misclassification and low wages—including in today’s extractive industries. Kate Aronoff, The New Republic, 10 Mar. 2021 Murkowski, however, said that’s unrealistic in a rural, remote state like Alaska known for its extractive industries. Josh Siegel, Washington Examiner, 5 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Given that scientists from every corner of the globe agree that the world has an ever-shortening window to curb emissions, allowing the extractive industries an easier path to commodify the Earth is extremely alarming. Nick Martin, The New Republic, 10 Jan. 2020 At the central government level, Chinese leaders for years have trumpeted their commitment to shift to green growth after relying for decades on low-value manufacturing and resource-extractive industries that caused thick smog and polluted soil. Gerry Shih, Washington Post, 20 Nov. 2019 In reality, multibillion-dollar extractive industries—and the carbon-spewing corporations of the Global North—bear far more blame than most individuals. Sam Adler-bell, The New Republic, 24 Sep. 2019 Among the findings presented in the 1,200-page document, the Canadian government pinpointed extractive industries and man camps as hotbeds of violence. Nick Martin, The New Republic, 15 Oct. 2019 By 1949, there were five American companies that produced the purified Irish moss extractive, including the Krim-Ko Corporation in New Bedford, Massachusetts, and Kraft Foods Company in Chicago. Emily Toomey, Smithsonian, 23 July 2019 That changed too, as jobs were lost to free trade and extractive industries like mining promised to replace them. Jennifer Szalai, New York Times, 11 July 2018 This, plus the breakneck growth of extractive industries, explains why African forests are disappearing at a rate of 0.5% a year, faster than in South America. The Economist, 21 Apr. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'extractive.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of extractive

Adjective

1599, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Noun

1810, in the meaning defined above

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Time Traveler for extractive

Time Traveler

The first known use of extractive was in 1599

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Statistics for extractive

Last Updated

14 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Extractive.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/extractive. Accessed 20 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for extractive

extractive

adjective
ex·​trac·​tive | \ ik-ˈstrak-tiv, ˈek-ˌ How to pronounce extractive (audio) \

Medical Definition of extractive

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: of, relating to, or involving extraction extractive processes

extractive

noun

Medical Definition of extractive (Entry 2 of 2)

: something extracted or extractable : extract

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