exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) \

Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the state or a period of forced absence from one's country or home
b : the state or a period of voluntary absence from one's country or home
2 : a person who is in exile

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to banish or expel from one's own country or home

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Other Words from exile

Noun

exilic \ eg-​ˈzi-​lik How to pronounce exilic (audio) \ adjective

Choose the Right Synonym for exile

Verb

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

Examples of exile in a Sentence

Noun They hoped that his exile would be temporary. Many chose to live as exiles rather than face persecution. Verb with their conquest of the Moors complete, Ferdinand and Isabella next exiled the Jews from Spain
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun The ceremony will be attended by officials from Britain, the U.S. — the 17th-century colonists’ origin and destination — and the Netherlands, where the Puritan pilgrims lived in exile before their voyage. James Brooks And Jill Lawless, USA TODAY, "400 years later, a new Mayflower will sail without humans," 16 Sep. 2020 His bona fides include years of human-rights work in exile and as director of the Iraq Memory Foundation upon his return to Baghdad in 2003. Trudy Rubin, Star Tribune, "How Iraq could become a Mideast anchor, not a 'forever war'," 16 Sep. 2020 The ceremony will be attended by officials from Britain, the U.S. — the 17th-century colonists' origin and destination — and the Netherlands, where the Puritan pilgrims lived in exile before their voyage. James Brooks And Jill Lawless, chicagotribune.com, "400 years later, a new Mayflower will sail without humans," 15 Sep. 2020 This body was launched by Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, who probably won the election on August 9th but who has been forced into exile. The Economist, "Will Putin save Lukashenko?," 12 Sep. 2020 His regime has cracked down on opposition leaders in the country, detaining or forcing into exile almost all the main organizers of the anti-government demonstrations. Jordan Fabian, Bloomberg.com, "Belarus Election ‘Fraudulent,’ White House Spokeswoman Says," 9 Sep. 2020 But, in the past few days, the crackdown on protesters in the streets became more brutal, and members of the Coordinating Council were, one by one, arrested or forced into exile. Masha Gessen, The New Yorker, "Svetlana Alexievich Is Not Going Anywhere," 9 Sep. 2020 The 43-year-old had lived in exile in England since 2000 after becoming a Putin critic. Washington Post, "Why poison is the weapon of choice in Putin’s Russia," 21 Aug. 2020 Seven years in exile has been enough; he should be allowed to return home without going to prison. Star Tribune, "Trump should make a deal with Edward Snowden," 28 Aug. 2020 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb One following the contemporary Arab cultural movement will notice, especially in the final third of the century that has just passed, that there is a tendency in this movement to put ‘the other’ on trial, then to exile and evict him. Sam Sweeney, National Review, "The Zero-Sum Game of Syrian Politics," 6 Sep. 2020 To be exiled from a group or to see our group crushed by its enemies, could mean death. Osita Nwanevu, The New Republic, "We’re Not Polarized Enough," 19 May 2020 One way to end would be to have Carrie exiled in Russia and living in some Soviet-like apartment block in an incredibly grim situation, isolated from the world like Ed Snowden. James Hibberd, EW.com, "Homeland showrunner breaks down shocking series finale, explains final scene," 27 Apr. 2020 Caputo’s former client fled Putin and now is exiled in Germany. Deroy Murdock, National Review, "A Patriot and a Professional," 17 Apr. 2020 The other coronaviruses have long been around, so a certain part of the population has immunity, which may help exile those viruses under unfavorable conditions. Jon Cohen, Science | AAAS, "Why do dozens of diseases wax and wane with the seasons—and will COVID-19?," 13 Mar. 2020 The ensuing dictatorship of General Augusto Pinochet lasted 17 years; but Jara’s music, and that of other artists who were censored, exiled or killed, lived on. The Economist, "The beat goes on Demonstrators in Chile are looking to the past for their soundtrack," 12 Mar. 2020 The pressure is on the starters, with Price and Rick Porcello exiled and Betts’s departure casting a pall of old-fashioned defeatist skepticism over the season. Globe Staff, BostonGlobe.com, "For a change, Red Sox bullpen is the pitching building block," 24 Feb. 2020 The couple was exiled and moved to France, where the Duke died in 1972. Heather Finn, Good Housekeeping, "What Really Happened When Queen Elizabeth II Visited the Duke of Windsor on His Deathbed," 17 Feb. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exile

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for exile

Noun

Middle English exil, from Anglo-French essil, exil, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul an exile

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Time Traveler for exile

Time Traveler

The first known use of exile was in the 14th century

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Statistics for exile

Last Updated

25 Sep 2020

Cite this Entry

“Exile.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exile. Accessed 30 Sep. 2020.

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More Definitions for exile

exile

noun
How to pronounce exile (audio) How to pronounce exile (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a situation in which you are forced to leave your country or home and go to live in a foreign country
: a period of time during which someone has lived in exile
: a person who has been forced to live in a foreign country : a person who is in exile

exile

verb

English Language Learners Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to go to live in a distant place or foreign country : to force (someone) into exile

exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzīl How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsīl \

Kids Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the situation of a person who is forced to leave his or her own country He's living in exile.
2 : the period of time someone is forced to live away from his or her country a 20 year exile
3 : a person who is forced to leave his or her own country

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Kids Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to leave his or her own country

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Comments on exile

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