exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsī(-ə)l How to pronounce exile (audio) \

Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : the state or a period of forced absence from one's country or home
b : the state or a period of voluntary absence from one's country or home
2 : a person who is in exile

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

transitive verb

: to banish or expel from one's own country or home

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Other Words from exile

Noun

exilic \ eg-​ˈzi-​lik How to pronounce exile (audio) \ adjective

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Verb

banish, exile, deport, transport mean to remove by authority from a state or country. banish implies compulsory removal from a country not necessarily one's own. banished for seditious activities exile may imply compulsory removal or an enforced or voluntary absence from one's own country. a writer who exiled himself for political reasons deport implies sending out of the country an alien who has illegally entered or whose presence is judged inimical to the public welfare. illegal aliens will be deported transport implies sending a convicted criminal to an overseas penal colony. a convict who was transported to Australia

Examples of exile in a Sentence

Noun They hoped that his exile would be temporary. Many chose to live as exiles rather than face persecution. Verb with their conquest of the Moors complete, Ferdinand and Isabella next exiled the Jews from Spain
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun In 1973, during his exile, Mr. Theodorakis presented a sweeping survey of his work at Avery Fisher Hall in New York City, including a trilogy based on the poems of Neruda. New York Times, 2 Sep. 2021 But as a filmmaker and writer, Sina strives to use art to channel this trauma and portray his exile from his family and his homeland, Afghanistan. Alexander Durie, Variety, 27 Aug. 2021 Perhaps the very forces that facilitated our exile from Eden will one day reanimate our garden with digital life. Meghan O'gieblyn, Wired, 24 Aug. 2021 The Taliban’s top leaders made a triumphal return to Afghanistan earlier this week, taking a flight from their exile in Qatar to Kabul after their fighters’ lightning victory over the U.S.-backed Afghan government. Nabih Bulos, Los Angeles Times, 19 Aug. 2021 Local clergy presented a jumbo check for $11,350 to support their month-long exile form Texas and to embrace their cause. Todd J. Gillman, Dallas News, 26 July 2021 God says that following their entry into the land of Israel, the Jews would sin, resulting in their exile. Rabbi Avi Weiss, sun-sentinel.com, 19 July 2021 But Phair says that what led to her music exile was more the tiring cycle of recording, promoting and touring and also raising her son, Nick, who was still in elementary school. Washington Post, 27 May 2021 Having escaped his previous exile from Elba, off the coast of Italy, the French emperor was a flight risk to his fellow European rulers who wanted rid of him. Julia Buckley, CNN, 5 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Shortly after winning Big Game, the Cardinal were informed that Santa Clara County banned contact sports in an attempt to stem a coronavirus surge and would exile the team. Rusty Simmons, San Francisco Chronicle, 7 Aug. 2021 Neither Heinze or Martinez have explained what prompted the former coach to exile the 2018 MLS MVP after his return in June from playing for Venezuela in Copa America. Matt Winkeljohn, Star Tribune, 20 July 2021 There is a scene in a Profile of Eileen Fisher where Fisher realizes, to her obvious dismay, that her attempt to exile one of her house cats has been seized upon by Malcolm as a minor sign of some obscure character flaw. The New Yorker, 17 June 2021 She was released upon agreeing to exile from the state, but still faces charges. Tim Fernholz, Quartz, 2 June 2021 In 2016, before Colin Kaepernick took the knee that would exile him from the NFL, members of the reigning WNBA champion Minnesota Lynx took to the court during warm-ups wearing Black Lives Matter T-shirts. Nasha Smith, Forbes, 13 May 2021 Facebook asked its oversight board, an independent organization meant to act as a surepe founded last year, to review its decision to exile Trump in late January. Abram Brown, Forbes, 5 May 2021 The few Republicans who chose the same path as Cheney, or who honor the principles that once anchored the party that won the Cold War, are doomed to defeat or exile, like former leaders of a political movement overtaken by its radicalizing dogma. Stephen Collinson, CNN, 5 May 2021 Fearing for their lives, other young demonstrators have fled to Iraq’s semiautonomous Kurdish region, or abroad and to exile. Louisa Loveluck, Washington Post, 12 Apr. 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exile.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of exile

Noun

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

Verb

14th century, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for exile

Noun

Middle English exil, from Anglo-French essil, exil, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul an exile

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Time Traveler for exile

Time Traveler

The first known use of exile was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near exile

exilarchate

exile

exiler

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Statistics for exile

Last Updated

14 Sep 2021

Cite this Entry

“Exile.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exile. Accessed 19 Sep. 2021.

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More Definitions for exile

exile

noun

English Language Learners Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: a situation in which you are forced to leave your country or home and go to live in a foreign country
: a period of time during which someone has lived in exile
: a person who has been forced to live in a foreign country : a person who is in exile

exile

verb

English Language Learners Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to go to live in a distant place or foreign country : to force (someone) into exile

exile

noun
ex·​ile | \ ˈeg-ˌzīl How to pronounce exile (audio) , ˈek-ˌsīl \

Kids Definition of exile

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1 : the situation of a person who is forced to leave his or her own country He's living in exile.
2 : the period of time someone is forced to live away from his or her country a 20 year exile
3 : a person who is forced to leave his or her own country

exile

verb
exiled; exiling

Kids Definition of exile (Entry 2 of 2)

: to force (someone) to leave his or her own country

More from Merriam-Webster on exile

Nglish: Translation of exile for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of exile for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about exile

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