exchequer

noun
ex·​che·​quer | \ ˈeks-ˌche-kər How to pronounce exchequer (audio) , iks-ˈche- How to pronounce exchequer (audio) \

Definition of exchequer

1 capitalized : a department or office of state in medieval England charged with the collection and management of the royal revenue and judicial determination of all revenue causes
2 capitalized : a former superior court having jurisdiction in England and Wales primarily over revenue matters and now merged with King's Bench
3 often capitalized
a : the department or office of state in Great Britain and Northern Ireland charged with the receipt and care of the national revenue
b : the national banking account of this realm
4 : treasury especially : a national or royal treasury
5 : pecuniary resources : funds

Examples of exchequer in a Sentence

their son would make beseeching requests for more money whenever his personal exchequer was getting low
Recent Examples on the Web In October, every household will get 200 pounds ($260) off their bills to cushion the impact of rising gas prices, at a cost of around 6 billion pounds to the exchequer. Philip Aldrick, Bloomberg.com, 28 Mar. 2022 The likely loss to the exchequer of between €2 billion to €2.4 billion is equivalent to a fifth of the State’s annual corporate tax revenue. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 9 June 2021 Some 64m meals were consumed at 84,000 venues over the first nine days, at a cost of £336m to the exchequer. The Economist, 31 Aug. 2020 The Resolution Foundation’s Torsten Bell estimates Hunt’s plan would cost the exchequer in the region of 13 billion pounds ($16.6 billion), while Johnson’s would cost about 10 billion pounds. Washington Post, 20 Sep. 2019 The company plans to ship £2.5bn-worth of polyhalite a year at full production and send an annual £470m to the exchequer. The Economist, 17 Oct. 2019 Why can’t Modi’s all-pervasive goods and services tax pull some of it back for the exchequer to ease the financial constraints on infrastructure? Andy Mukherjee | Bloomberg, Washington Post, 10 Sep. 2019 Under the programme, state exchequers are taking on three-fourths of the utilities’ debt. Kuwar Singh, Quartz India, 18 June 2019 Very often such firms are loss-making and a burden to the exchequer. The Economist, 14 Sep. 2017 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'exchequer.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

First Known Use of exchequer

14th century, in the meaning defined at sense 1

History and Etymology for exchequer

Middle English escheker, from Anglo-French, chessboard, counting table, exchequer — more at checker

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Time Traveler for exchequer

Time Traveler

The first known use of exchequer was in the 14th century

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Dictionary Entries Near exchequer

excheat

exchequer

exchequer bill

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Statistics for exchequer

Last Updated

4 Apr 2022

Cite this Entry

“Exchequer.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/exchequer. Accessed 16 May. 2022.

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More Definitions for exchequer

exchequer

noun
ex·​che·​quer | \ ˈeks-ˌche-kər, iks-ˈche- How to pronounce exchequer (audio) \

Legal Definition of exchequer

1 capitalized : a royal office in medieval England at first responsible for the collection and management of the royal revenue and later for the adjudication of revenue cases
2 capitalized : a former superior court having law and equity jurisdiction in England and Wales over primarily revenue cases and now merged with the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of Justice

called also Court of the Exchequer

Note: The Exchequer was created in England by the Norman kings. In addition to being divided into a court of common law and a court of equity, at one point the Exchequer also had jurisdiction over all actions, except those involving real property, between two subjects of the Crown. In 1841, the Exchequer's equity jurisdiction, except over revenue cases, was transferred to the Court of Chancery, and in 1881 the Exchequer was merged into the Queen's Bench Division of the High Court of Justice.

3 often capitalized : the office in Great Britain and Northern Ireland responsible for the collection and care of the national revenue

History and Etymology for exchequer

Anglo-French eschecker, eschequ(i)er, from Old French eschequier royal treasury, reckoning board or cloth marked with squares, literally, chessboard, from eschec chess

More from Merriam-Webster on exchequer

Britannica English: Translation of exchequer for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about exchequer

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