ethnography

noun

eth·​nog·​ra·​phy eth-ˈnä-grə-fē How to pronounce ethnography (audio)
: the study and systematic recording of human cultures
also : a descriptive work produced from such research
ethnographer noun
ethnographic adjective
or ethnographical
ethnographically adverb

Examples of ethnography in a Sentence

Recent Examples on the Web In 2015, Nick Rogers, now a sociologist at the University of Pittsburgh, conducted an ethnography of a pickup-basketball game. Ross Andersen, The Atlantic, 13 June 2024 That inference is based on ethnographies of other cultures. Paul Smaglik, Discover Magazine, 23 May 2024 The ecstatic effect is one of historical ethnography, a reanimation not only of the poet’s creative vitality but also of the vigorous, colorful, sensual, violent poetry of daily village life and ritual that surrounded him. Richard Brody, The New Yorker, 19 Mar. 2024 With books ranging from brilliant women from history, to brilliant women writing history (ethnography and memoir), there’s plenty for nonfiction stans. Bethanne Patrick, Los Angeles Times, 1 Feb. 2024 Bartram was thus a trailblazer in a stunning array of disciplines: botany, ecology, zoology, ethnography, ornithology. Kiley Bense, Smithsonian Magazine, 9 Jan. 2024 Human marketers then conduct qualitative research through in-depth interviews and ethnography. Gillian Oakenfull, Forbes, 29 Nov. 2023 Until a couple of decades ago, Indigenous art was not considered fine art but ethnography — and relegated to the nearby Canadian Museum of History. Norimitsu Onishi, New York Times, 9 Oct. 2023 At a time when big data looms large yet comes short in capturing the minute ways that COVID-19 alters daily life, the ethnography lab will help inject different ways of thinking about the pandemic. Foreign Affairs, 24 Sep. 2021

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'ethnography.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

French ethnographie, from ethno- + -graphie -graphy

First Known Use

1811, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of ethnography was in 1811

Dictionary Entries Near ethnography

Cite this Entry

“Ethnography.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ethnography. Accessed 19 Jun. 2024.

Medical Definition

ethnography

noun
eth·​nog·​ra·​phy eth-ˈnäg-rə-fē How to pronounce ethnography (audio)
plural ethnographies
: the study and systematic recording of human cultures
also : a descriptive work produced from such research
ethnographic adjective
or ethnographical
ethnographically adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on ethnography

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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