ethnography

noun

eth·​nog·​ra·​phy eth-ˈnä-grə-fē How to pronounce ethnography (audio)
: the study and systematic recording of human cultures
also : a descriptive work produced from such research
ethnographer noun
ethnographic adjective
or ethnographical
ethnographically adverb

Example Sentences

Recent Examples on the Web Simply extracting terms and data from an ethnography disregards the holistic nature of the text, which contains specific information that's needed to accurately capture the context of the song. Marcus Woo, Discover Magazine, 30 Nov. 2019 Someone with more knowledge of South Asian ethnography should weigh in. Razib Khan, Discover Magazine, 4 Aug. 2013 Performing this 'wardrobe ethnography' will help you dive deeper into and understand your clothing. Patricia Karounos, refinery29.com, 25 Nov. 2022 Annetta Grant, a professor at Bucknell University who studies the home-renovation market, recently co-authored an ethnography on how home-reno media has changed people’s relationship to their home. Amanda Mull, The Atlantic, 18 Nov. 2022 There’s no ethnography here nor an intrusive attempt to frame these images for those who’d only encounter them on the big screen. Manuel Betancourt, Variety, 17 Nov. 2022 Bruce Rigsby was an anthropologist who specialized in language and ethnography on two continents, Australia and North America. Wil Phinney, oregonlive, 12 Nov. 2022 The flaneuring around pandemic New York becomes more focused in the second half of the book, which is an ethnography of Black Lives Matter actions in Manhattan. Max Holleran, The New Republic, 27 Sep. 2022 Britain is hoarding a treasure no one is allowed to see Murray’s top aide in Nigeria, Bernard Fagg, had a brother, William, who worked in the ethnography department of the British Museum. David Frum, The Atlantic, 14 Sep. 2022 See More

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'ethnography.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

Word History

Etymology

French ethnographie, from ethno- + -graphie -graphy

First Known Use

1811, in the meaning defined above

Time Traveler
The first known use of ethnography was in 1811

Dictionary Entries Near ethnography

Cite this Entry

“Ethnography.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/ethnography. Accessed 28 Jan. 2023.

Medical Definition

ethnography

noun
eth·​nog·​ra·​phy eth-ˈnäg-rə-fē How to pronounce ethnography (audio)
plural ethnographies
: the study and systematic recording of human cultures
also : a descriptive work produced from such research
ethnographic adjective
or ethnographical
ethnographically adverb

More from Merriam-Webster on ethnography

Last Updated: - Updated example sentences
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