emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən \

Definition of emotion 

1a obsolete : disturbance
2a : the affective aspect of consciousness : feeling
b : a state of feeling
c : a conscious mental reaction (such as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body

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Synonyms for emotion

Synonyms

chord, feeling, passion, sentiment

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Choose the Right Synonym for emotion

feeling, emotion, affection, sentiment, passion mean a subjective response to a person, thing, or situation. feeling denotes any partly mental, partly physical response marked by pleasure, pain, attraction, or repulsion; it may suggest the mere existence of a response but imply nothing about the nature or intensity of it. the feelings that once moved me are gone emotion carries a strong implication of excitement or agitation but, like feeling, encompasses both positive and negative responses. the drama portrays the emotions of adolescence affection applies to feelings that are also inclinations or likings. a memoir of childhood filled with affection for her family sentiment often implies an emotion inspired by an idea. her feminist sentiments are well known passion suggests a very powerful or controlling emotion. revenge became his ruling passion

Examples of emotion in a Sentence

a display of raw emotion The defendant showed no emotion when the verdict was read. She was overcome with emotion at the news of her friend's death.
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Recent Examples on the Web

Weirdly huge eyes aside, this Robert Rodriguez feature looks chock-full of emotion and action in equal measure. Darren Orf, Popular Mechanics, "The 2019 Sci-Fi Film Guide," 3 Jan. 2019 Courtsey This distaste for anger might seem ironic to anyone who watched two candidates on both ends of the political spectrum—Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders—wildly succeed by leveraging that exact emotion. Julie Zeilinger, Marie Claire, "The Women Who Ran...and Lost," 24 Oct. 2018 Watching the 1995 film Forrest Gump can elicit sincere emotion and pleasure or more negative responses in viewers, depending on one's subjective cinematic tastes. Jennifer Ouellette, Ars Technica, "What watching Forrest Gump tells us about how we store memories," 18 Oct. 2018 For Slaggert, bringing that emotion to life took careful consideration and reconnecting with his past. Janelle Okwodu, Vogue, "Meet the Superstar Male Model Who Became Summer’s Leading Man," 6 July 2018 And that’s why a good conversation where people are actually being authentically themselves and having their authentic emotions, why that plays and why nobody turns that off when that’s happening. Recode Staff, Recode, "Full transcript: Gimlet founders Alex Blumberg and Matt Lieber on Recode Media," 27 June 2018 Over the millennia, scientists and philosophers who could not deny that animals appeared to have emotions, thoughts and inner lives could still draw a bright line between them and us thanks to language. Jeffrey Kluger, Time, "Koko the Gorilla Wasn't Human, But She Taught Us So Much About Ourselves," 21 June 2018 That emotion is critical to repelling the anger Democrats are riding against Trump. Jeremy Wallace, San Antonio Express-News, "Republicans in Texas scoff at ‘blue wave’ even as they brace for it," 16 June 2018 Just as Crazy Rich Asians has shown there’s still life in the romantic comedy, A Star Is Born takes us back to the days when Hollywood movies were about big dreams and big, heartbreaking emotions. 2. John Powers, Vogue, "5 Great Things From the Opening of the Toronto Film Festival," 8 Sep. 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emotion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emotion

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 1a

History and Etymology for emotion

Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move

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Statistics for emotion

Last Updated

15 Jan 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emotion

The first known use of emotion was in 1579

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More Definitions for emotion

emotion

noun

English Language Learners Definition of emotion

: a strong feeling (such as love, anger, joy, hate, or fear)

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən \

Kids Definition of emotion

: strong feeling (as anger, love, joy, or fear) often accompanied by a physical reaction She flushed with emotion.

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən \

Medical Definition of emotion 

1 : the affective aspect of consciousness
2 : a state of feeling
3 : a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body — compare affect

Other Words from emotion

emotional \ -​shnəl, -​shən-​ᵊl \ adjective
emotionality \ -​ˌmō-​shə-​ˈnal-​ət-​ē \ noun, plural emotionalities
emotionally \ -​ˈmō-​shnə-​lē, -​shən-​ᵊl-​ē \ adverb

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Comments on emotion

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