emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Definition of emotion

1a : a conscious mental reaction (such as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body
b : a state of feeling
c : the affective aspect of consciousness : feeling
2a : excitement
b obsolete : disturbance

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Synonyms for emotion

Synonyms

chord, feeling, passion, sentiment

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Choose the Right Synonym for emotion

feeling, emotion, affection, sentiment, passion mean a subjective response to a person, thing, or situation. feeling denotes any partly mental, partly physical response marked by pleasure, pain, attraction, or repulsion; it may suggest the mere existence of a response but imply nothing about the nature or intensity of it. the feelings that once moved me are gone emotion carries a strong implication of excitement or agitation but, like feeling, encompasses both positive and negative responses. the drama portrays the emotions of adolescence affection applies to feelings that are also inclinations or likings. a memoir of childhood filled with affection for her family sentiment often implies an emotion inspired by an idea. her feminist sentiments are well known passion suggests a very powerful or controlling emotion. revenge became his ruling passion

Examples of emotion in a Sentence

a display of raw emotion The defendant showed no emotion when the verdict was read. She was overcome with emotion at the news of her friend's death.
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Recent Examples on the Web

To me, that’s great satire, because there’s an emotion and earnestness to it. Alissa Wilkinson, Vox, "Jesse Eisenberg on the “aspirational and also absurd” manliness in his new movie," 12 July 2019 My love of the show, like most Murphy endeavors, is its intemperate spirit, its taste for amphitheater emotion. Jason Parham, WIRED, "Depth of Field: On Pose, the Past Is the Present," 11 July 2019 Building a relationship with negative emotions allows me to feel and not run away from them. Alexa Lisitza, Teen Vogue, "The Best Advice from Therapists, From 50 Different People," 9 July 2019 That line is tinged with a whole lot of emotion for a throwaway line. Rachel Paige, refinery29.com, "Spider-Man: Far From Home," 5 July 2019 The aesthetic of the company’s miniature folding bicycles is best defined as Raspberry Pi meets Google Cardboard, appealing to a sense of nerdy utility, not emotion. Thomas Ricker, The Verge, "Brompton Electric bike review: remarkably practical," 2 July 2019 Twitter users responded with mixed emotions — and a lot of questions — after Gov. Doug Ducey vowed on Twitter to withdraw state financial incentives recently promised to Nike. Joshua Bowling, azcentral, "Your questions about Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey, Nike and the Goodyear plant deal, answered," 2 July 2019 Musical supervisor Justin Levine worked with Timbers to build a soundscape that captured the movie's original spirit and the characters' emotions by incorporating popular music from the years since the film was released alongside classic songs. Suzy Evans, The Hollywood Reporter, "'Moulin Rouge!' Stars Aaron Tveit and Karen Olivo Go Deeper and Darker on Stage," 1 July 2019 Reduced critical thinking, little to no access to our true memories and heightened impulsivity, and emotions during normal dream states often make for head-scratching moments when our eyes first open in the morning. Achilleas Pavlou, Quartz, "A lucid dream researcher’s tips for controlling your dreams," 29 June 2019

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emotion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emotion

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 2b

History and Etymology for emotion

Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move

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Statistics for emotion

Last Updated

16 Jul 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emotion

The first known use of emotion was in 1579

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More Definitions for emotion

emotion

noun

English Language Learners Definition of emotion

: a strong feeling (such as love, anger, joy, hate, or fear)

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Kids Definition of emotion

: strong feeling (as anger, love, joy, or fear) often accompanied by a physical reaction She flushed with emotion.

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Medical Definition of emotion

1 : the affective aspect of consciousness
2 : a state of feeling
3 : a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body — compare affect

Other Words from emotion

emotional \ -​shnəl, -​shən-​ᵊl How to pronounce emotional (audio) \ adjective
emotionality \ -​ˌmō-​shə-​ˈnal-​ət-​ē How to pronounce emotionality (audio) \ noun, plural emotionalities
emotionally \ -​ˈmō-​shnə-​lē, -​shən-​ᵊl-​ē How to pronounce emotionally (audio) \ adverb

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Comments on emotion

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