emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Definition of emotion

1a : a conscious mental reaction (such as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body
b : a state of feeling
c : the affective aspect of consciousness : feeling
2a : excitement
b obsolete : disturbance

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Synonyms for emotion

Synonyms

chord, feeling, passion, sentiment

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Choose the Right Synonym for emotion

feeling, emotion, affection, sentiment, passion mean a subjective response to a person, thing, or situation. feeling denotes any partly mental, partly physical response marked by pleasure, pain, attraction, or repulsion; it may suggest the mere existence of a response but imply nothing about the nature or intensity of it. the feelings that once moved me are gone emotion carries a strong implication of excitement or agitation but, like feeling, encompasses both positive and negative responses. the drama portrays the emotions of adolescence affection applies to feelings that are also inclinations or likings. a memoir of childhood filled with affection for her family sentiment often implies an emotion inspired by an idea. her feminist sentiments are well known passion suggests a very powerful or controlling emotion. revenge became his ruling passion

Examples of emotion in a Sentence

a display of raw emotion The defendant showed no emotion when the verdict was read. She was overcome with emotion at the news of her friend's death.
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Recent Examples on the Web

If that's the barometer for Cersei showing emotion, then something pretty devastating must happen in season eight—like Jaime dying. Christopher Rosa, Glamour, "All the Game of Thrones Fan Theories You Need to Read Before Season 8 Premieres," 8 Mar. 2019 Hoehn spoke regularly with his attorney, Daniel Borgen, during Crews' testimony but showed little emotion. Dave Kolpack, Fox News, "Woman says boyfriend pressed her to 'produce a baby'," 25 Sep. 2018 Zschaepe showed no emotion when the verdict was read. Erik Kirschbaum, latimes.com, "German Neo-Nazi found guilty of murder in execution-style slayings of migrants," 11 July 2018 The 43-year-old showed no emotion as Goetzl read out her sentence. Frank Jordans, chicagotribune.com, "German suspect in neo-Nazi trial guilty of 10 killings, court finds," 11 July 2018 At Silverado, before the concert began, some of the residents were subdued, showing little emotion, not saying much. Robert Mccoppin, courant.com, "Music Can Call Back Loved Ones Lost In Alzheimer's Darkness," 22 June 2018 Tomlinson showed no emotion when the verdict was read. David Ovalle, miamiherald, "Realtor guilty of extorting 'The Jills,' his rivals in Miami Beach's home sales market," 22 June 2018 Alec Cook showed no emotion Thursday as the sentence was handed down by Dane County Judge Stephen Ehlke. Karen Herzog, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, "Alec Cook sentenced to 3 years in prison for sex crimes against fellow UW-Madison students," 21 June 2018 Ben is the type of player that doesn't show emotion on the field. Kyle Stackpole, Howard County Times, "Marriotts Ridge junior Josh Olsufka captures baseball Player of the Year," 20 June 2018

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'emotion.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of emotion

1579, in the meaning defined at sense 2b

History and Etymology for emotion

Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move

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Statistics for emotion

Last Updated

21 May 2019

Look-up Popularity

Time Traveler for emotion

The first known use of emotion was in 1579

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More Definitions for emotion

emotion

noun

English Language Learners Definition of emotion

: a strong feeling (such as love, anger, joy, hate, or fear)

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Kids Definition of emotion

: strong feeling (as anger, love, joy, or fear) often accompanied by a physical reaction She flushed with emotion.

emotion

noun
emo·​tion | \ i-ˈmō-shən How to pronounce emotion (audio) \

Medical Definition of emotion

1 : the affective aspect of consciousness
2 : a state of feeling
3 : a conscious mental reaction (as anger or fear) subjectively experienced as strong feeling usually directed toward a specific object and typically accompanied by physiological and behavioral changes in the body — compare affect

Other Words from emotion

emotional \ -​shnəl, -​shən-​ᵊl How to pronounce emotional (audio) \ adjective
emotionality \ -​ˌmō-​shə-​ˈnal-​ət-​ē How to pronounce emotionality (audio) \ noun, plural emotionalities
emotionally \ -​ˈmō-​shnə-​lē, -​shən-​ᵊl-​ē How to pronounce emotionally (audio) \ adverb

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Comments on emotion

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