emaciate

verb

ema·​ci·​ate i-ˈmā-shē-ˌāt How to pronounce emaciate (audio)
-ˈmā-sē-
emaciated; emaciating

transitive verb

1
: to cause to lose flesh so as to become very thin
cattle emaciated by illness
2
: to make feeble

intransitive verb

: to waste away physically
emaciation noun

Examples of emaciate in a Sentence

without adequate medical supplies, doctors could only look on helplessly as cholera victims continued to emaciate
Recent Examples on the Web At barely five pounds, Matilda was emaciated and clinging to life when the Monmouth County Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals took her in. Kathleen Hopkins, USA TODAY, 30 May 2023 Six dead giraffes, bodies emaciated from the lack of food and water, photographed by Ed Ram, show the horror of Kenya’s prolonged ongoing drought, which has threatened and displaced animals and humans alike. Nell Lewis, CNN, 29 Mar. 2023 Past herds of cows wandering through busy settlements along the highway in search of water, so emaciated their ribs were showing. Jada Yuan, Washington Post, 24 Feb. 2023 Many were emaciated, unlike the examples in the current study. Joshua Sokol, New York Times, 25 Feb. 2020 Three of them were severely malnourished and the rest were emaciated, according to the Sheriff's Office. James Carr, azcentral, 21 Feb. 2020 Detectives noted that much of the food in the home was locked away and that James' body was emaciated when found. Sarah Sarder, Houston Chronicle, 18 Feb. 2020 Scores of common murres, one of the most prolific seabirds, washed up on beaches, and many were emaciated, the researchers said. oregonlive, 21 Jan. 2020 The 6-month-old calico and her sibling were found to be emaciated, with low body temperatures and stomach issues. Arizona Republic, azcentral, 22 Nov. 2019 See More

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'emaciate.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

Etymology

Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare, from e- + macies leanness, from macer lean — more at meager

First Known Use

1646, in the meaning defined at intransitive sense

Time Traveler
The first known use of emaciate was in 1646

Dictionary Entries Near emaciate

Cite this Entry

“Emaciate.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/emaciate. Accessed 1 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

emaciate

verb
ema·​ci·​ate i-ˈmā-shē-ˌāt How to pronounce emaciate (audio)
emaciated; emaciating
: to cause to lose flesh so as to become very thin
emaciation noun

Medical Definition

emaciate

verb
ema·​ci·​ate i-ˈmā-shē-ˌāt How to pronounce emaciate (audio)
emaciated; emaciating

transitive verb

: to cause to lose flesh so as to become very thin

intransitive verb

: to waste away physically

More from Merriam-Webster on emaciate

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