dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : an explosive that is made of nitroglycerin absorbed in a porous material and that often contains ammonium nitrate or cellulose nitrate also : an explosive (such as a mixture of ammonium nitrate and nitrocellulose) that contains no nitroglycerin
2 : one that has a powerful effect an actress who's dynamite at the box office also : something that has great potential to cause trouble or conflict an issue regarded as political dynamite

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to blow up with dynamite
2 : to cause the failure or destruction of

dynamite

adjective

Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

: terrific, wonderful a dynamite performance

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Other Words from dynamite

Noun

dynamitic \ ˌdī-​nə-​ˈmi-​tik How to pronounce dynamitic (audio) \ adjective

Verb

dynamiter noun

Examples of dynamite in a Sentence

Noun The death penalty is political dynamite. Verb They plan to dynamite the old building. Adjective They put on a dynamite performance. a summer blockbuster that features some really dynamite special effects
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun Court documents say Richard Holzer was arrested Friday in Pueblo just after the agents brought him what were supposedly two pipe bombs along with dynamite to blow up Temple Emanuel. CBS News, "Alleged white supremacist arrested in thwarted synagogue attack in Colorado, FBI says," 4 Nov. 2019 The vegetables that emerge from the oven, however, are dynamite. Dominic Armato, azcentral, "This husband-and-wife team's Phoenix restaurant lives up to the hype. Here's what to order," 25 Oct. 2019 Sunday night at Royce Hall, Jaime Martín’s first program in his new post was dynamite. Los Angeles Times, "Review: With Jaime Martín in the driver’s seat, LACO concert is a thrill ride," 30 Sep. 2019 Pregame analysis: Through three games, the Bears defense has been dynamite against the run. Dan Wiederer, chicagotribune.com, "Can the Bears slow down Dalvin Cook? 3 keys for Sunday’s game against the Vikings," 27 Sep. 2019 The video, filmed during a boozy evening at an Ibiza villa five months before Mr Strache entered government, was dynamite. The Economist, "Four months after facing crisis, Sebastian Kurz looks like winning again," 26 Sep. 2019 Guests can find the horseshoes hanging right side up throughout the loading station, however, just before passengers begin their last ascent into a cavern filled with dynamite, they are forewarned of the danger ahead with an upside-down horseshoe. Advertorial, Orange County Register, "History & Heritage: Tipping Our Hat to the Wildest Ride in the Wilderness," 15 Sep. 2019 The secondary is dynamite, and Louisville transfer Jonathan Greenard playing opposite Jabari Zuniga will provide a good pass rush. Christopher Smith, al, "2019 SEC football power rankings from a gambling perspective," 21 Aug. 2019 Sometime in its history, someone had blasted the starboard side of the wreck apart with dynamite, bending sturdy timbers outward like porcupine spines and blowing a heavy cast-iron piece of the ship's bilge pump 20 feet away. Kiona N. Smith, Ars Technica, "What will happen to the last slave ship in the US?," 2 Aug. 2019 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb An investigative report released by the Alabama Historical Commission quoted historian John Sledge as saying one of the Meahers told him family members twice dynamited the wreck in the 1950s to retrieve valuable copper off the hull. NBC News, "America's last slave ship could offer a case for reparations," 9 Oct. 2019 One group attempted—but failed—to dynamite an oil pipeline. Trevor Paulhus, Smithsonian, "When the Socialist Revolution Came to Oklahoma—and Was Crushed," 19 Sep. 2019 Other accounts claim family members dynamited the ship’s hull for the metal as late as the 1950s. Washington Post, "No one claims ownership of last slave ship ‘Clotilda’," 17 Sep. 2019 Sherazuddin Saifi remembers the day the Taliban arrived at the national museum in 2001, a period of cultural rampage in which the world’s largest standing Buddha statues in Bamyan province were dynamited, to global horror. Washington Post, "Afghans restore art shattered by Taliban as peace deal nears," 20 Aug. 2019 But no fish were dynamited on Monday, as a group of coastal Alabama fishing guides donated their time and their boats to take a group of military vets out on the water. al.com, "Veterans’ group, coastal guides team on fishing trip," 11 June 2019 Arthur Powell Davis, head of the Bureau, had been looking for years for a way to turn the Colorado into a hydroelectric energy, including dynamiting the surrounding canyons. David Grossman, Popular Mechanics, "The Hoover Dam Changed America—And It Might Do It Again," 27 July 2018 While cities like Chicago and St. Louis dynamited some of their most troubled projects, New York City held on. Benjamin Weiser, New York Times, "New York City Housing Authority, Accused of Endangering Residents, Agrees to Oversight," 11 June 2018 After thousands of miles of tunnels were dynamited and drilled, a giant open pit copper mine was dug near the headwaters of the creek. New York Times, "Let the Stream Run Through It," 25 June 2018 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective The actresses playing the students themselves are dynamite comedians, especially Crabbe and Akibu, in supposedly subordinate roles; their reactions to Johnson’s Paulina, and to each other, are a production unto itself. Peter Marks, Washington Post, "Mean girls are at home in Ghana, too," 24 Sep. 2019 Out Friday, the dynamic and dynamite Highwomen album contains a dozen songs that span classic country and contemporary Americana. Sarah Rodman, EW.com, "From Dolly Parton's blessing to Tonight Show giggles: Get to know the Highwomen," 6 Sep. 2019 The scene, which jolts and spellbinds with the affecting draw of a Last Poets cipher, is just one of several fluorescent currents from HBO’s dynamic and dynamite six-episode series A Black Lady Sketch Show, which debuts tonight on HBO. Wired, "A Black Lady Sketch Show," 2 Aug. 2019 Pickerington Central was dynamite both offensively and defensively. Adam Baum, Cincinnati.com, "Mason falls to top-ranked Pickerington Central in OHSAA state basketball semifinal," 16 Mar. 2018 The scene, which jolts and spellbinds with the affecting draw of a Last Poets cipher, is just one of several fluorescent currents from HBO’s dynamic and dynamite six-episode series A Black Lady Sketch Show, which debuts tonight on HBO. Wired, "A Black Lady Sketch Show," 2 Aug. 2019 Pickerington Central was dynamite both offensively and defensively. Adam Baum, Cincinnati.com, "Mason falls to top-ranked Pickerington Central in OHSAA state basketball semifinal," 16 Mar. 2018 Tiny Dynamite’s intense, disturbing, and absorbing new drama Perfect Blue, now through July 23 at Christ Church Neighborhood House in Old City, opens at the beginning of the Sixth Great Extinction. Tirdad Derakhshani, Philly.com, "Explosive ideas, real passion: Eco-drama 'Perfect Blue' is perfect theater," 17 July 2017 Could there really be dynamite dim sum without the DMV-style take-a-number system? Michael Russell | The Oregonian/oregonlive, OregonLive.com, "Portland's 10 most underrated brunches," 10 May 2017

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dynamite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dynamite

Noun

1867, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1881, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1922, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dynamite

Noun

Greek dýnamis "power, strength" + -ite entry 1 — more at dynamic entry 1

Note: Though the principal figure in the development of dynamite, Alfred nobel, was Swedish, the earliest patent for the substance (May, 1867) was filed in the United Kingdom, so the word was effectively first introduced in English rather than in Swedish or German.

Verb

derivative of dynamite entry 1

Adjective

from attributive use of dynamite entry 1

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Statistics for dynamite

Last Updated

14 Nov 2019

Time Traveler for dynamite

The first known use of dynamite was in 1867

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More Definitions for dynamite

dynamite

noun
How to pronounce dynamite (audio)

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a powerful explosive that is often used in the form of a stick
: someone or something that may cause arguments or trouble

dynamite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

: to blow up (something) using dynamite

dynamite

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

informal : exciting and very impressive or pleasing

dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Kids Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an explosive used in blasting

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Kids Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 2)

: to blow up with dynamite

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Comments on dynamite

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