dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

1 : an explosive that is made of nitroglycerin absorbed in a porous material and that often contains ammonium nitrate or cellulose nitrate also : an explosive (such as a mixture of ammonium nitrate and nitrocellulose) that contains no nitroglycerin
2 : one that has a powerful effect an actress who's dynamite at the box office also : something that has great potential to cause trouble or conflict an issue regarded as political dynamite

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

1 : to blow up with dynamite
2 : to cause the failure or destruction of

dynamite

adjective

Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

: terrific, wonderful a dynamite performance

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Other Words from dynamite

Noun

dynamitic \ ˌdī-​nə-​ˈmi-​tik How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \ adjective

Verb

dynamiter noun

Examples of dynamite in a Sentence

Noun The death penalty is political dynamite. Verb They plan to dynamite the old building. Adjective They put on a dynamite performance. a summer blockbuster that features some really dynamite special effects
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Recent Examples on the Web: Noun For a refreshing summer salad, look no further than this dynamite watermelon salad with feta and crunchy cucumber tossed in a super simple, yet delicious, dressing. Kate Merker, Good Housekeeping, 15 June 2021 The hole diggers with their half sticks of dynamite busted through hard rock. Dave Lieber, Dallas News, 28 May 2021 Four girls killed by white supremacists who planted dynamite at 16th St. Baptist Church in Birmingham in 1963. Mary Colurso | Mcolurso@al.com, al, 22 May 2021 Convict Paul Orgeron explodes a suitcase of dynamite on a school playground, killing himself, two adults and three children. Cnn Editorial Research, CNN, 25 Apr. 2021 As a film, Eurovision is an excellent Rachel McAdams comedy vehicle fused with an okay Will Ferrell comedy vehicle that makes great use of the deeply particular Eurovision milieu and features a dynamite Dan Stevens supporting turn. Joe Reid, Vulture, 21 Apr. 2021 Having Harry in country at last, for the first time since the March 9 Oprah broadcast, might now best be compared to hauling an unsteady detonator cap into a roomful of sweating dynamite. Guy Martin, Forbes, 12 Apr. 2021 The cast boasted such dynamite stars as Meryl Streep, Nicole Kidman, Keegan-Michael Key, Kerry Washington, James Corden and Andrew Rannells. oregonlive, 10 Mar. 2021 President Teodoro Obiang Nguema Mbasogo said the blasts were caused by negligence involving dynamite at a military base. Joe Parkinson, WSJ, 7 Mar. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Verb Lighting up the world like dynamite? K-pop, or Korean pop music, has such a global reach that even President Joe Biden on Friday gave the music's fans a shout-out. Chelsey Cox, USA TODAY, 22 May 2021 Over two days, a white mob indiscriminately shot Black people in the street and used airplanes to drop dynamite on Greenwood buildings. Justin Phillips, San Francisco Chronicle, 30 May 2021 White pilots flew airplanes that dropped dynamite over the neighborhood, the report stated, making the Tulsa aerial attack what historians call among the first of an American city. New York Times, 24 May 2021 Once an area with an abundance of undersea life, dynamite and cyanide fishing that began decades ago resulted in not only the capture of edible fish but the killing of corals and other parts of the food chain. Johanna Read, Forbes, 5 May 2021 The Taglieris, who work in IT and finance, are used to hearing dynamite detonations at least once a month at the plant, the couple said. Washington Post, 23 Apr. 2021 Personne may have found a way to dynamite this argument for much of the art NFT market. Andrew Stuttaford, National Review, 23 Apr. 2021 Hotel Transylvania 2, the best of the series so far, opened with $48.5 million in September of 2015, alongside Anne Hathaway and Robert De Niro’s dynamite The Intern. Scott Mendelson, Forbes, 9 Apr. 2021 Both Kilpatrick and Hobek were discovered to be carrying explosives, dynamite and nitroglycerine, for the safe. Paula Allen, San Antonio Express-News, 17 Apr. 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective Rustic Restaurant in Rocky River and Place to Be in Lakewood are dynamite. cleveland, 18 Mar. 2021 Pieper has a dynamite personality, a creative mind, a master’s degree in marketing and a wonderful family who has supported all her endeavors. oregonlive, 4 Jan. 2021 The reclusive government blamed the explosions on fires set by farmers living near the military base and the negligent handling of dynamite stocks by the military unit guarding them. Reuters, CNN, 11 Mar. 2021 Pieper has a dynamite personality, a creative mind, a master’s degree in marketing and a wonderful family who has supported all her endeavors. oregonlive, 4 Jan. 2021 Pieper has a dynamite personality, a creative mind, a master’s degree in marketing and a wonderful family who has supported all her endeavors. oregonlive, 4 Jan. 2021 Pieper has a dynamite personality, a creative mind, a master’s degree in marketing and a wonderful family who has supported all her endeavors. oregonlive, 4 Jan. 2021 Pieper has a dynamite personality, a creative mind, a master’s degree in marketing and a wonderful family who has supported all her endeavors. oregonlive, 4 Jan. 2021 If need be, the former caretaker has a dynamite license. Brent Underwood, Popular Mechanics, 13 Dec. 2020

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dynamite.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dynamite

Noun

1867, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Verb

1881, in the meaning defined at sense 1

Adjective

1922, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dynamite

Noun

Greek dýnamis "power, strength" + -ite entry 1 — more at dynamic entry 1

Note: Though the principal figure in the development of dynamite, Alfred nobel, was Swedish, the earliest patent for the substance (May, 1867) was filed in the United Kingdom, so the word was effectively first introduced in English rather than in Swedish or German.

Verb

derivative of dynamite entry 1

Adjective

from attributive use of dynamite entry 1

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Learn More About dynamite

Time Traveler for dynamite

Time Traveler

The first known use of dynamite was in 1867

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Statistics for dynamite

Last Updated

21 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Dynamite.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dynamite. Accessed 25 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for dynamite

dynamite

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 3)

: a powerful explosive that is often used in the form of a stick
: someone or something that may cause arguments or trouble

dynamite

verb

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 3)

: to blow up (something) using dynamite

dynamite

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of dynamite (Entry 3 of 3)

informal : exciting and very impressive or pleasing

dynamite

noun
dy·​na·​mite | \ ˈdī-nə-ˌmīt How to pronounce dynamite (audio) \

Kids Definition of dynamite

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: an explosive used in blasting

dynamite

verb
dynamited; dynamiting

Kids Definition of dynamite (Entry 2 of 2)

: to blow up with dynamite

More from Merriam-Webster on dynamite

Nglish: Translation of dynamite for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of dynamite for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about dynamite

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