dynamic

adjective
dy·​nam·​ic | \ dī-ˈna-mik How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \

Definition of dynamic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

1a : marked by usually continuous and productive activity or change a dynamic city
b : energetic, forceful a dynamic personality
2 or less commonly dynamical \ dī-​ˈna-​mi-​kəl How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \
a : of or relating to physical force or energy
b : of or relating to dynamics (see dynamics entry 1)
3 of random-access memory : requiring periodic refreshment of charge in order to retain data

dynamic

noun
plural dynamics

Definition of dynamic (Entry 2 of 2)

: a force or factor that controls or influences a process of growth, change, interaction, or activity : a dynamic force or factor a social/cultural/interpersonal dynamic … describes a world order that seems to be evolving from ideology as the principal dynamic— Woody West Denial has always been the most devastating social and political dynamic of the AIDS epidemic …— June E. Osborn Still, one wonders, Is there a way to achieve … results without some of the extraneous nastiness, the relentless controlling dynamic?— Jack McCallum — see also dynamics entry 1

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Other Words from dynamic

Adjective

dynamically \ dī-​ˈna-​mi-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \ adverb

Synonyms & Antonyms for dynamic

Synonyms: Adjective

Antonyms: Adjective

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Examples of dynamic in a Sentence

Adjective … tournament blackjack is more dynamic, and more complex, than simply playing against the house. — Michael Kaplan, Cigar Aficionado, December 2002 Indeed, one of the most dynamic influences on family life and society in the last century was the extension of concepts to individual worth and human rights. — Perdita Huston, Ms., December 2001/January 2002 The new dynamic duo have little in common but a bright orange ball. — Stephen Rodrick, ESPN, 3 Apr. 2000 an exciting and dynamic performance the dynamic theory of heat Noun … the high-tech world is, at heart, a cruel, unforgiving place ruled by the merciless dynamics of the marketplace. — Michiko Kakutani, New York Times, 27 June 2002 … my memory of specific events is sketchy, but the general emotional flavor is engraved on my mind as a classic example of my family's bent dynamic. — Florence King, National Review, 15 Oct. 2001 … the Cambrian Explosion, created the evolutionary dynamic that produced most of the species that subsequently populated the earth, from insects and fish to dinosaurs and humans. — J. Madeleine Nash, Time, 20 Aug. 2001 Raisons d'état, not the dynamics of capitalism, created the American thrust for world influence. — Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., The Cycles of American History, 1986 the dynamic between a doctor and a patient Group dynamics are important to consider. The dynamics of this class are different from those of other classes. Disease was a central dynamic in the decrease in population. a study on famine and population dynamics
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Recent Examples on the Web: Adjective My team, normally very proactive and dynamic, was obviously impacted not just by these deaths, but also the environment of extreme fear and negativity. Shreevar Kheruka For Cnn Business Perspectives, CNN, 2 June 2021 The vessel is characterized by an aggressive profile and sleek, dynamic lines that Lobanov says were inspired by the vintage rides of the 1930s. Rachel Cormack, Robb Report, 2 June 2021 Building this dynamic on-screen was rather effortless for Anozie and Convery. Chancellor Agard, EW.com, 2 June 2021 The digital health market operates as a dynamic data marketplace: Data is the commodity that patients trade in exchange for clinical outcomes. Stefan Harrer, Forbes, 1 June 2021 For some of you, this means a change in your current relationship dynamic. Meghan Rose, Glamour, 1 June 2021 That spirit was intensified by the crisp, uncluttered sound of his band, who played with verve and pinpoint dynamic precision throughout. George Varga, San Diego Union-Tribune, 31 May 2021 The lineup slumped down the stretch, especially after dynamic leadoff hitter Jacob Melton was lost for the season because of shoulder surgery, enduring a 24-inning scoreless streak over parts of the final four games. Joe Freeman, oregonlive, 31 May 2021 On the Friday between the team’s matches against Portland and Kansas City, the Pride started a day of training with a team-building activity, dividing up in small groups led by members of the leadership committee to talk about the team dynamic. Julia Poe, orlandosentinel.com, 31 May 2021 Recent Examples on the Web: Noun But there is a second part to that dynamic, which is that there are also more people in those liberal spaces that fall on the sharp end of the debates that people previously were quite indulgent of. Isaac Chotiner, The New Yorker, 3 June 2021 Kertanis and others in the public health field hope the COVID-19 pandemic has permanently altered that dynamic. Emily Brindley, courant.com, 1 June 2021 Melinda has always been more skillful at messaging than her now estranged husband, a dynamic perhaps best illustrated by the then couple’s 2019 appearance on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Natalie Shure, The New Republic, 1 June 2021 This could have been financially, within a relationship dynamic, due to a change of workplace, or within your community. Meghan Rose, Glamour, 1 June 2021 In some ways, the focus vs. diversification dilemma can be a mirror of the strategy vs. tactics dynamic. Tomer Bar Zeev, Quartz, 1 June 2021 The dynamic has afflicted presidents of both parties. Ronald Brownstein, CNN, 1 June 2021 Since last July, the family’s dynamic had been completely transformed. Lisa Krantz, San Antonio Express-News, 29 May 2021 Although complicated and intricate, the underlying reasons for the dynamic are relatively simple – there are simply not enough homes for the need in the area. Ralph Chapoco, The Arizona Republic, 28 May 2021

These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'dynamic.' Views expressed in the examples do not represent the opinion of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback.

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First Known Use of dynamic

Adjective

1744, in the meaning defined at sense 2a

Noun

1868, in the meaning defined above

History and Etymology for dynamic

Adjective

borrowed from French dynamique or New Latin dynamicus "relating to physical force or energy," borrowed from Greek dynamikós "powerful, efficacious," from dýnamis "power, strength, capability" (i-stem derivative, with suffixal -m-, of dýnamai, dýnasthai "to be able, have the strength or capability (to do something), be equivalent to," of uncertain origin) + -ikos -ic entry 1

Note: French dynamique and New Latin dynamicus were popularized, if not introduced, by Gottfried Wilhelm leibniz. The Greek verb dýnamai appears to have been an original nasal present with the -n- infix generalized throughout the paradigm. If an Indo-European base *deu̯h2- (or *deh2u̯-?) "to fit together, join" is reconstructible on the basis of Tocharian B tsuwa "(it) adhered, cohered," Germanic *taujan- "to prepare, make" (see taw entry 1), then dy-n-a- may be allied; assumed is an approximate sense development "be joined" > "fit, be suitable" > "be capable."

Noun

borrowed from French dynamique, noun derivative of dynamique dynamic entry 1

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Time Traveler for dynamic

Time Traveler

The first known use of dynamic was in 1744

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Statistics for dynamic

Last Updated

5 Jun 2021

Cite this Entry

“Dynamic.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary, Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/dynamic. Accessed 14 Jun. 2021.

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More Definitions for dynamic

dynamic

adjective

English Language Learners Definition of dynamic

 (Entry 1 of 2)

: always active or changing
: having or showing a lot of energy
technical : of or relating to energy, motion, or physical force

dynamic

noun

English Language Learners Definition of dynamic (Entry 2 of 2)

: the way that two or more people behave with each other because of a particular situation
: something that causes change or growth in something else
technical : the science that studies motion and the forces that cause or stop motion

dynamic

adjective
dy·​nam·​ic | \ dī-ˈna-mik How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \

Kids Definition of dynamic

: always active, energetic, or changing a dynamic city

dynamic

adjective
dy·​nam·​ic | \ dī-ˈnam-ik How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \

Medical Definition of dynamic

1 also dynamical \ -​i-​kəl How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \
a : of or relating to physical force or energy
b : of or relating to dynamics
2 : functional sense 1b a dynamic disease
3a : marked by continuous usually productive activity or change a dynamic population
b : marked by energy or forcefulness a dynamic personality

Other Words from dynamic

dynamically \ -​i-​k(ə-​)lē How to pronounce dynamic (audio) \ adverb

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